CharmanderMD

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Having a hard time finding a clear answer online. I know there is a peds neuro fellowship after doing a peds residency but is that the only path to doing childhood neuro? I'm interested in adult neurology as well and would love to be able to see both.

Thanks in advance for your wisdom!


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Crayola227

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yes neurologists treat kids, but if it's complex, difficult, or rare by neurologist standards kids might be referred to a pediatric neurologist (its own subspecialty with its own boards and everything)

typically it would be the neurologist making that referral, and often they would remain involved

the reason is that pediatric neurologists aren't plentiful or widespread, it can take a while to get in to see one

they deal the most with rare peds neuro disorders, so rare the typical neurologist hasn't seen much of whatever it is, or difficult to manage sz patients

there are lots of sub-fields withing neurology, and many have fellowships and such

however, I rotated at a community neuro practice, and they had individuals who informally specialized in movement disorders, HA/migraines, szs, was really good at interpreting EEGs, and one who was the "EMG guy", all within their practice

some things in medicine you end up doing just because you do it, so you could make a way for yourself as the peds neuro guy in the community without a special residency or fellowship, although we all must acknowledge there are limits to what you can do without such formal training

TLDR:
you can do a special residency or fellowship, or choose to focus on that population as an attending
 
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CharmanderMD

CharmanderMD

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yes neurologists treat kids, but if it's complex, difficult, or rare by neurologist standards kids might be referred to a pediatric neurologist (its own subspecialty with its own boards and everything)

typically it would be the neurologist making that referral, and often they would remain involved

the reason is that pediatric neurologists aren't plentiful or widespread, it can take a while to get in to see one

they deal the most with rare peds neuro disorders, so rare the typical neurologist hasn't seen much of whatever it is, or difficult to manage sz patients

there are lots of sub-fields withing neurology, and many have fellowships and such

however, I rotated at a community neuro practice, and they had individuals who informally specialized in movement disorders, HA/migraines, szs, was really good at interpreting EEGs, and one who was the "EMG guy", all within their practice

some things in medicine you end up doing just because you do it, so you could make a way for yourself as the peds neuro guy in the community without a special residency or fellowship, although we all must acknowledge there are limits to what you can do without such formal training

TLDR:
you can do a special residency or fellowship, or choose to focus on that population as an attending
Thanks a lot! Very helpful


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AlbinoHawk DO

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You could, but at the same time you probably wouldn't want to. Your training is mostly geared toward adults, and even though you get exposure to child neurology, it is limited in comparison to the rest of your training. In my experience rotating with private neurologists, they may see some older teenagers (15-17), but they tend to avoid taking actual children as clients.
 
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BigRedBeta

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yes neurologists treat kids, but if it's complex, difficult, or rare by neurologist standards kids might be referred to a pediatric neurologist (its own subspecialty with its own boards and everything)

typically it would be the neurologist making that referral, and often they would remain involved

the reason is that pediatric neurologists aren't plentiful or widespread, it can take a while to get in to see one

they deal the most with rare peds neuro disorders, so rare the typical neurologist hasn't seen much of whatever it is, or difficult to manage sz patients

there are lots of sub-fields withing neurology, and many have fellowships and such

however, I rotated at a community neuro practice, and they had individuals who informally specialized in movement disorders, HA/migraines, szs, was really good at interpreting EEGs, and one who was the "EMG guy", all within their practice

some things in medicine you end up doing just because you do it, so you could make a way for yourself as the peds neuro guy in the community without a special residency or fellowship, although we all must acknowledge there are limits to what you can do without such formal training

TLDR:
you can do a special residency or fellowship, or choose to focus on that population as an attending
Let's be clear. A regular adult neurology residency typically only includes 3 months of peds neuro. So while you can theoretically see children, it makes up a very small portion of your training and you are probably not going to feel comfortable with most children who are in need of neurologic care.
In comparison, a pediatric neurologist does 2 years of general peds, 2 years of pediatric neuro and 1 year of adult neurology. The argument could be made much more readily that the child neurologist is far better prepared to take care of adults than the other way around.

Most people figure out in medical school that they need to have one patient population (either adults or kids) to be professionally fulfilled. Very, very few people truly *need* both kids and adults to be content in practice.
 
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CharmanderMD

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Thanks for the input guys.

I'm from a community that barely has neurologists let alone peds neurologists so I feel like it wouldn't be unreasonable for a neurologist to see simple cases around here.

That being said the reason I asked at all is because I liked my peds rotation much more than I expected but I'm also pretty attached to neuro at this point. Guess I just still have some stuff to figure out


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yes neurologists treat kids, but if it's complex, difficult, or rare by neurologist standards kids might be referred to a pediatric neurologist (its own subspecialty with its own boards and everything)

typically it would be the neurologist making that referral, and often they would remain involved

the reason is that pediatric neurologists aren't plentiful or widespread, it can take a while to get in to see one

they deal the most with rare peds neuro disorders, so rare the typical neurologist hasn't seen much of whatever it is, or difficult to manage sz patients

there are lots of sub-fields withing neurology, and many have fellowships and such

however, I rotated at a community neuro practice, and they had individuals who informally specialized in movement disorders, HA/migraines, szs, was really good at interpreting EEGs, and one who was the "EMG guy", all within their practice

some things in medicine you end up doing just because you do it, so you could make a way for yourself as the peds neuro guy in the community without a special residency or fellowship, although we all must acknowledge there are limits to what you can do without such formal training

TLDR:
you can do a special residency or fellowship, or choose to focus on that population as an attending
I was actually hoping someone would say something like this. I'm more interested in gen neuro, but would like to have a "niche"-to be that "___ guy", something that I'm known to be good at within the department without doing a fellowship (right now, I'm more interested in doing gen neuro than tailoring my practice to a subspecialty). I was wondering what geographical location you reside-W/E/N/S? rural/urban/suburb? From my understanding (very limited, I admit), if you're in an urban setting, esp one in/near major city, it is hard to do that, as there already are many neurologists who actually went through the the fellowship.
 

Crayola227

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Let's be clear. A regular adult neurology residency typically only includes 3 months of peds neuro. So while you can theoretically see children, it makes up a very small portion of your training and you are probably not going to feel comfortable with most children who are in need of neurologic care.
In comparison, a pediatric neurologist does 2 years of general peds, 2 years of pediatric neuro and 1 year of adult neurology. The argument could be made much more readily that the child neurologist is far better prepared to take care of adults than the other way around.

Most people figure out in medical school that they need to have one patient population (either adults or kids) to be professionally fulfilled. Very, very few people truly *need* both kids and adults to be content in practice.
eh, my best friend is currently in a peds neuro program, and what I wrote is basically what they told me

what you say is completely true, but there are plenty of kids with sz disorders, HAs/migraines, and functional disorders that are managed by general neurologists and don't need referral
 
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Crayola227

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I was actually hoping someone would say something like this. I'm more interested in gen neuro, but would like to have a "niche"-to be that "___ guy", something that I'm known to be good at within the department without doing a fellowship (right now, I'm more interested in doing gen neuro than tailoring my practice to a subspecialty). I was wondering what geographical location you reside-W/E/N/S? rural/urban/suburb? From my understanding (very limited, I admit), if you're in an urban setting, esp one in/near major city, it is hard to do that, as there already are many neurologists who actually went through the the fellowship.
it was a mid-sized city in a state that doesn't have that many neuro programs, with only a few big cities
you could say that practice was suburban, there's only 2 medium sized hospitals in the area I'm talking about

to be clear, you should only practice whatever is the standard of care for your specialty, but plenty of "generalists" choose to focus more narrowly in what is the scope of their practice
 

raiderette

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There is a fellowship called NDD that focuses on neurodevelopmental disorders. Those docs can see patients into adulthood.

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Syncrohnize

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Having a hard time finding a clear answer online. I know there is a peds neuro fellowship after doing a peds residency but is that the only path to doing childhood neuro? I'm interested in adult neurology as well and would love to be able to see both.

Thanks in advance for your wisdom!


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As a general rule, anything Internal Medicine or Neurology for kids has a Pediatric fellowship. Peds/Neuro can be done in 5 years.
 

Ismet

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Having a hard time finding a clear answer online. I know there is a peds neuro fellowship after doing a peds residency but is that the only path to doing childhood neuro? I'm interested in adult neurology as well and would love to be able to see both.

Thanks in advance for your wisdom!


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Neurology residents don't have much peds neuro exposure.

If you do Peds Neuro, you also get plenty of adult neuro exposure, although you'll still be primarily treating kids. The peds neuro program at my med school was 2 years gen peds + 1 year adult neuro + 2 years child neuro.
 
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