Can osteopathic physicians find work as easy an MD

Nov 26, 2010
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My mom is a nurse and she tells me that she has never (knowingly) worked with a DO, so she is concerned that if I choose the DO route, I will have more of a struggle finding work. Is this true? I'm new to learning a lot about DO, so I'd just like to clarify that.


Edit: Obviously she hasn't worked in every hospital in the country, let alone the city and she knows that she can't speak for a DO. My focus here is on whether or not DO's are just as capable of finding work anywhere that MD's are working.
 
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jinobi

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AFAIK, some hospitals may have a DO bias; however, the majority will not be concerned with the two letters that go after your name. What matters more is if you graduated from a residency program in good standing, and the quality of the residency program you graduated from.

Some people have never worked with a DO because they're less prevalent that MDs; this is especially true if you're looking at West Coast.
 
Oct 17, 2010
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My mom is a nurse and she tells me that she has never worked with a DO, so she is concerned that if I choose the DO route, I will have more of a struggle finding work. Is this true? I'm new to learning a lot about DO, so I'd just like to clarify that.
No. The things is, a lot of the times in hospitals, people do not know if they are working with DO's. This has been discussed a lot on here, but some hospital computers automatically make every physician an MD. Therefore she would never know that she is working with a DO if this was the case. Also about 60% of DO's go into private practice. Again, there would be less contact in a hospital setting. However, take a look at some hospital's physician lists. There's DO's on most of them.
 
OP
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AFAIK, some hospitals may have a DO bias; however, the majority will not be concerned with the two letters that go after your name. What matters more is if you graduated from a residency program in good standing, and the quality of the residency program you graduated from.

Some people have never worked with a DO because they're less prevalent that MDs; this is especially true if you're looking at West Coast.
Thanks, but what does AFAIK stand for?
 
OP
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As far as I know
Thanks.

And DenCo, you made a good point and my mom agrees. That makes me feel a lot more relieved. I am excited about learning more about what the program has to offer.
 
Jun 8, 2010
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No. The things is, a lot of the times in hospitals, people do not know if they are working with DO's. This has been discussed a lot on here, but some hospital computers automatically make every physician an MD. Therefore she would never know that she is working with a DO if this was the case. Also about 60% of DO's go into private practice. Again, there would be less contact in a hospital setting. However, take a look at some hospital's physician lists. There's DO's on most of them.

Where did you get that number? That sounds VERY low. I would assume it is much closer to 80%.

OP, you won't have to worry about being unemployed if you are a good doctor. If you are a bad one... you will probably still be able to get employed somewhere, but then you might be more likely to end up in a position you don't want.
 

drctother

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Thanks.

And DenCo, you made a good point and my mom agrees. That makes me feel a lot more relieved. I am excited about learning more about what the program has to offer.
Let me be the first to point out something. With respect, your mom probably has no idea what she's talking about. Im sure she is a nurse....but in what hospital? Just because her and her friends have never heard of DO is not in any way representative of the American Health Care system. I would bet my left testicle, she has worked with a DO and not known it. Go to the AACOMA website, there is a 8 minute video you can show her. Show your mom some of the resources on that website and Im sure she will be impressed:)
 
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Let me be the first to point out something. With respect, your mom probably has no idea what she's talking about. Im sure she is a nurse....but in what hospital? Just because her and her friends have never heard of DO is not in any way representative of the American Health Care system. I would bet my left testicle, she has worked with a DO and not known it. Go to the AACOMA website, there is a 8 minute video you can show her. Show your mom some of the resources on that website and Im sure she will be impressed:)
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Oct 17, 2010
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Where did you get that number? That sounds VERY low. I would assume it is much closer to 80%.

OP, you won't have to worry about being unemployed if you are a good doctor. If you are a bad one... you will probably still be able to get employed somewhere, but then you might be more likely to end up in a position you don't want.
woops.. I didn't mean private practice.. I meant general practitioners, as in they don't have rounds in hospitals at all.

The number has come up in all of the interviews I have been on so far.
 

DrMom

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Many private primary care physicians (family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics...there are very few general practitioners anymore...for good reason) take care of their own patients when they are in the hospital. Certainly not all of them, but quite a few.
 

cabinbuilder

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My mom is a nurse and she tells me that she has never worked with a DO, so she is concerned that if I choose the DO route, I will have more of a struggle finding work. Is this true? I'm new to learning a lot about DO, so I'd just like to clarify that.
This is soooo not true. My phone rings daily and my email is filled daily with job offers. There are so many that I have my choice of where I want to go and can name my own price. Right now I am holding out for that perfect job that fits me and my family. Doing locums in the interim which also pays hugely well until that right job comes along. YOU will not struggle as a DO for employment, ever.
 

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Take comfort in the fact that your mom has no idea what she's talking about. No offense, but the average nurse, even if it is your mom, isn't really someone I'd turn to for advice about becoming a physician. They are generally very poorly informed about the process - as evidenced by her comments.
 

DrMom

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This is soooo not true. My phone rings daily and my email is filled daily with job offers. There are so many that I have my choice of where I want to go and can name my own price. Right now I am holding out for that perfect job that fits me and my family. Doing locums in the interim which also pays hugely well until that right job comes along. YOU will not struggle as a DO for employment, ever.
I have a great job (in a group that is a mix of MD and DO physicians) and still get daily (literally) calls or emails about other (good) jobs out there.

Virtually nobody who is hiring cares what your degree is. In some specialties/groups they *may* care where you did your residency (ACGME vs AOA), but that's an exception, not the rule.

I find that many nurses have no idea that they've been working with DOs. Kinda like how many patients don't realize their PCP or specialist is a DO.

Bottom line: getting a job as a DO is no different than getting a job as an MD.
 

lftbndlbrnchblk

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Job prospects are pretty good if you're a doctor, DO or MD. It depends on your specialty, but I think certain specialties need more help than others. I'm mostly familiar with ER docs and I'll tell you, these people can pick up and leave whenever they want and set up a whole new life pretty much any place in the country. Those guys/gals are in HUGE demand. It matters not if they are DO or MD grads, not if they have previous work experience (1 to 2 years). Their residency doesn't even make a huge difference anymore at that point.
 

willen101383

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Take comfort in the fact that your mom has no idea what she's talking about. No offense, but the average nurse, even if it is your mom, isn't really someone I'd turn to for advice about becoming a physician. They are generally very poorly informed about the process - as evidenced by her comments.
This times a million. The reverse is also true....I know nothing about becoming a nurse. I know they dissect cats and have "clinicals," but that is about all I know.
 

cabinbuilder

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Job prospects are pretty good if you're a doctor, DO or MD. It depends on your specialty, but I think certain specialties need more help than others. I'm mostly familiar with ER docs and I'll tell you, these people can pick up and leave whenever they want and set up a whole new life pretty much any place in the country. Those guys/gals are in HUGE demand. It matters not if they are DO or MD grads, not if they have previous work experience (1 to 2 years). Their residency doesn't even make a huge difference anymore at that point.
This is especially true if you are Family Practice or any primary care.
 

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Agree with denco88: the DO I'm shadowing know has "MD" attached to her name tag b/c the hospital designates all physicians as MDs.
 

JaggerPlate

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Take comfort in the fact that your mom has no idea what she's talking about. No offense, but the average nurse, even if it is your mom, isn't really someone I'd turn to for advice about becoming a physician. They are generally very poorly informed about the process - as evidenced by her comments.
I really do have a lot of respect for RNs who work hard within the team model in hospitals (NPs, DNPs, and CRNAs can go to hell), but I HIGHLY agree with this statement. I have a few family members who are RNs and conversing with them recently, I was shocked how little they knew about the process, differences between the degree, etc, etc.

And to the OP ... it's very unlikely that you'll ever have a hard time finding work as a doc (MD or DO). Despite how crappy the situation gets (reimbursement wise), it doesn't seem like the security is going anywhere for a while.
 
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I really do have a lot of respect for RNs who work hard within the team model in hospitals (NPs, DNPs, and CRNAs can go to hell), but I HIGHLY agree with this statement. I have a few family members who are RNs and conversing with them recently, I was shocked how little they knew about the process, differences between the degree, etc, etc.

And to the OP ... it's very unlikely that you'll ever have a hard time finding work as a doc (MD or DO). Despite how crappy the situation gets (reimbursement wise), it doesn't seem like the security is going anywhere for a while.
Trust me, I obviously don't believe her, otherwise I wouldn't have posted this ha. I still haven't fully decided on whether to go with MD or DO, so it's just another thing I'm trying to sort out. At the end of the day, I just want to help solve medical problems like Gregory House, minus the overblown cynicism.
 

rcheech7

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Trust me, I obviously don't believe her, otherwise I wouldn't have posted this ha. I still haven't fully decided on whether to go with MD or DO, so it's just another thing I'm trying to sort out. At the end of the day, I just want to help solve medical problems like Gregory House, minus the overblown cynicism.
For some reason this just made me lol :laugh:
 

teacherman84

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Trust me, I obviously don't believe her, otherwise I wouldn't have posted this ha. I still haven't fully decided on whether to go with MD or DO, so it's just another thing I'm trying to sort out. At the end of the day, I just want to help solve medical problems like Gregory House, minus the overblown cynicism.
Yeah, that job doesnt exist...hate to burst your bubble
 

Helen Wheels

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Story8,

DO's only make up about 7% of the physician workforce currently. This number is likely going to increase if the number of DO schools/enrollment continues to increase. Since DO's are such a minority now, that is likely why your Mom has not seen so many of them at her job. Also, you tend not to notice things like this - when I had a hospital job I realized one day that the dr I had worked with for awhile was a DO. Plus, many hospitals still unfortunately list DO's as MDs in their (outdated, shortsighted?) computer systems and on ID badges.

There won't be any problem with getting hired as a DO. Especially, if the current healthcare reform isn't changed. There are millions more people who will have health coverage under the new reforms. There was already a physician shortage projected before this.
 
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Story8,

DO's only make up about 7% of the physician workforce currently. This number is likely going to increase if the number of DO schools/enrollment continues to increase. Since DO's are such a minority now, that is likely why your Mom has not seen so many of them at her job. Also, you tend not to notice things like this - when I had a hospital job I realized one day that the dr I had worked with for awhile was a DO. Plus, many hospitals still unfortunately list DO's as MDs in their (outdated, shortsighted?) computer systems and on ID badges.

There won't be any problem with getting hired as a DO. Especially, if the current healthcare reform isn't changed. There are millions more people who will have health coverage under the new reforms. There was already a physician shortage projected before this.

I noticed that the number of DOs has increased over the years, but I wondered how is that realistically going to play when MD schools are popping up rather quickly too.

Recently 2 two MD schools opened in Florida (FIU and UCF). There is another MD school that kind of opened (FAU) in Florida this year. It's a little strange for them because their class size is rather small (like 14 inaugural students) and it is actually a part of UM medical school. Might have been a ploy just to get UM to take hold of the Boca Raton Community Hospital... anyway. There are also plans to open another MD school in Florida soon (Palm Beach Medical College).

From what I understand the distinctions between MD and DO are fairly null, but present. How will things play out with 15 MD schools opening in the ~ the next 4 years and 4 DO schools opening in that same time frame. Three of those DO schools are actually going to be new campuses for well known DO schools (VCOM, LECOM, KCUMB).
 
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I noticed that the number of DOs has increased over the years, but I wondered how is that realistically going to play when MD schools are popping up rather quickly too.

Recently 2 two MD schools opened in Florida (FIU and UCF). There is another MD school that kind of opened (FAU) in Florida this year. It's a little strange for them because their class size is rather small (like 14 inaugural students) and it is actually a part of UM medical school. Might have been a ploy just to get UM to take hold of the Boca Raton Community Hospital... anyway. There are also plans to open another MD school in Florida soon (Palm Beach Medical College).

From what I understand the distinctions between MD and DO are fairly null, but present. How will things play out with 15 MD schools opening in the ~ the next 4 years and 4 DO schools opening in that same time frame. Three of those DO schools are actually going to be new campuses for well known DO schools (VCOM, LECOM, KCUMB).

I think this is fairly obvious what the ramification are. More people for the same number of residency spots increases the necessary competitiveness for each spot and will more than likely send more people to IM and FP. If those are your interests that won't be an issue, but if not, then you better be prepared to work in med school. As far as job prospects, I'm not really sure it will negatively impact them right off the bat. There is such a need for physicians that I can't see that need going away before the next generation of physicians retire. The specialty positions will most likely experience very little shift, unless technology or other specialties zone them out. This is because the residency positions for most of those competitive fields are already getting filled and without new positions they will just continue to get filled. That's my take anyway.
 
R

rastegara

AFAIK, some hospitals may have a DO bias; however, the majority will not be concerned with the two letters that go after your name. What matters more is if you graduated from a residency program in good standing, and the quality of the residency program you graduated from.

Some people have never worked with a DO because they're less prevalent that MDs; this is especially true if you're looking at West Coast.

I am just curious is there any reason that D.O.s are less prevalent on the West Coast, particularly, California? Are jobs harder to attain or do the states make it difficult for D.Os to practice on the West Coast?
 

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I am just curious is there any reason that D.O.s are less prevalent on the West Coast, particularly, California? Are jobs harder to attain or do the states make it difficult for D.Os to practice on the West Coast?
Not an expert by any means, but California has 8 MD schools and only 2 DO (1 is 30 years old and the other about 12). In addition, there seemed to be a period when MD's tried to take over the DO by making it illegal in California and transformed UC Irvine into an MD school and granted an MD degree to all DO's that wanted it (for a fee, of course).

But as far as I know, it seems that WesternU has made a good DO culture in Southern California and even doctors that I've met in NorCal seem to not care about the entire MD/DO thing.
 

mauve

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This is soooo not true. My phone rings daily and my email is filled daily with job offers. There are so many that I have my choice of where I want to go and can name my own price. Right now I am holding out for that perfect job that fits me and my family. Doing locums in the interim which also pays hugely well until that right job comes along. YOU will not struggle as a DO for employment, ever.
Take comfort in the fact that your mom has no idea what she's talking about. No offense, but the average nurse, even if it is your mom, isn't really someone I'd turn to for advice about becoming a physician. They are generally very poorly informed about the process - as evidenced by her comments.
when you guys were referring to job offers, i was wondering a few things:
-how does the application process work? i know I'm worrying about something far off into the future but i'd still like to be informed

-have you had offers from abroad or just the US? and doesn't each state have specific requirements you have to meet before practising?
 
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fahimaz7

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Not an expert by any means, but California has 8 MD schools and only 2 DO (1 is 30 years old and the other about 12). In addition, there seemed to be a period when MD's tried to take over the DO by making it illegal in California and transformed UC Irvine into an MD school and granted an MD degree to all DO's that wanted it (for a fee, of course).

But as far as I know, it seems that WesternU has made a good DO culture in Southern California and even doctors that I've met in NorCal seem to not care about the entire MD/DO thing.
Illegal? Didn't they grandfather all of the DO's to MD's for a $1 processing charge, shortly after the military gave DO's an equal opportunity to practice? I don't think it was nearly as malicious as you tried to make it sound. Don't be surprised if DO's merge with MD's at some point in time down the road.
 

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Illegal? Didn't they grandfather all of the DO's to MD's for a $1 processing charge, shortly after the military gave DO's an equal opportunity to practice? I don't think it was nearly as malicious as you tried to make it sound. Don't be surprised if DO's merge with MD's at some point in time down the road.
No ... it was more the way he described it:

from what I understand, it was a $65 dollar charge, the DO degree was no longer valid in CA, and UCI was converted from a DO school (although I don't remember the year and that old DO school seemed to move around quite a bit during it's tenure in CA). Additionally, the degree given was considered by the MD community to be a 'mini' MD degree and wasn't valid in other states. It may not have been 'illegal,' but it was overturned less than a decade either, so it clearly wasn't binding and a judge found it to be shaky/unjust enough to throw it out.

Also, I wouldn't count on any sort of merger ... why would the AOA want or even need to do that? The only way this would ever happen is if ACGME programs closed their doors to DO applicants, but I don't really foresee this (or any other sort of move that would essentially do the same).
 
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A friend of my sister was looking for a job a few years ago (a DO) and the only time his degree came up was when they asked him if his residency was ACGME or AOA. According to him, that did matter.

He was not looking for academic jobs, so I am not sure what goes on there. Aside from that question (and he did do an ACGME residency), he said no one really cared.
 

JaggerPlate

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A friend of my sister was looking for a job a few years ago (a DO) and the only time his degree came up was when they asked him if his residency was ACGME or AOA. According to him, that did matter.

He was not looking for academic jobs, so I am not sure what goes on there. Aside from that question (and he did do an ACGME residency), he said no one really cared.
I've only heard of this happening in a few fields and (more specifically) a few fields IN a few states. Most of the time, it seems like AOA or ACGME board certification is satisfactory.
 

Dr Fraggle

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I've only heard of this happening in a few fields and (more specifically) a few fields IN a few states. Most of the time, it seems like AOA or ACGME board certification is satisfactory.
Where it does matter is in licensing in certain states. For instance in Florida, if you do an acgme residency as a DO, your program must have met certain requirements for you to be licensed to practice as a DO in the state. The aoa residencies meet that requirement without issue.
 

MLT2MT2DO

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I've only heard of this happening in a few fields and (more specifically) a few fields IN a few states. Most of the time, it seems like AOA or ACGME board certification is satisfactory.
FWIW, I have an anecdotal story of an orthopedic surgeon (DO) here in the Boise,ID area where it took him ~6 years to recieve full hospital privilages because of his AOA certification. However he was fully employed the whole time, though I have no idea what his job title was at the time.

Needless to say, DOs are a minority to ID and a better part of the NW. Something I'm hoping Touro-NV, PNWU, Western-Lebanon helps alleviate.
 

Dr Fraggle

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Illegal? Didn't they grandfather all of the DO's to MD's for a $1 processing charge, shortly after the military gave DO's an equal opportunity to practice? I don't think it was nearly as malicious as you tried to make it sound. Don't be surprised if DO's merge with MD's at some point in time down the road.
Actually it was very malignant and anti-DO. It seriously screwed over a lot of docs. They were allowed to practice in Ca, but were no longer able to practice outside the state.

http://history.osteopathic.org/reccalif.shtml

I don't think DOs will be merging any time soon. I'd like to know what you base your assumption on.
 

Dr Yiot

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Actually it was very malignant and anti-DO. It seriously screwed over a lot of docs. They were allowed to practice in Ca, but were no longer able to practice outside the state.

http://history.osteopathic.org/reccalif.shtml

I don't think DOs will be merging any time soon. I'd like to know what you base your assumption on.
i actually tihnk MD's will be merging with DO's and the MD degree will go away forever. 100 years from now noone will know what an MD is and DO's shall forever rule the world of medicine!:smuggrin:
 

fahimaz7

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i actually tihnk MD's will be merging with DO's and the MD degree will go away forever. 100 years from now noone will know what an MD is and DO's shall forever rule the world of medicine!:smuggrin:
Can we ban the pre-med with a Dr. name and no status?
 

fahimaz7

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Actually it was very malignant and anti-DO. It seriously screwed over a lot of docs. They were allowed to practice in Ca, but were no longer able to practice outside the state.

http://history.osteopathic.org/reccalif.shtml

I don't think DOs will be merging any time soon. I'd like to know what you base your assumption on.
Two parts.

1. We talked about it during my interview at WVCOM, where the panel if interviewers agreed (all DO's) that it'll most likely happen now that the curricula are very similar. They said it'll be the top pressing issue of our generation.

2. DO's are quickly straying towards the realm of contemporary medicine, with everything but OMM being the same. Since most DO's don't actually practice a single bit of OMM, is there really a difference?
 
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Two parts.

1. We talked about it during my interview at WVCOM, where the panel if interviewers agreed (all DO's) that it'll most likely happen now that the curricula are very similar. They said it'll be the top pressing issue of our generation.

2. DO's are quickly straying towards the realm of contemporary medicine, with everything but OMM being the same. Since most DO's don't actually practice a single bit of OMM, is there really a difference?

Just in the number of hoops required to jump through. Other than that, I have a hard time seeing a real difference in most fields outside of family med where OMT is utilized. Obviously, I didn't say that in my interview, but I think that's akin to you saying you're pumped about primary care at your MD school interview, the school sees you as an amazing budding altruistic physician, then immediately after you start the school begins to groom you for specialty positions to elevate it's status. It's all a big game and we just need to play it and hopefully we all get to where we want to go in the end, whether DO or MD.
 

JaggerPlate

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Where it does matter is in licensing in certain states. For instance in Florida, if you do an acgme residency as a DO, your program must have met certain requirements for you to be licensed to practice as a DO in the state. The aoa residencies meet that requirement without issue.
I think you're talking about the famous 5 states/resolution 42 debacle??? I can't go into much detail, but essentially, you either need to do a DO internship, or get the first year of ACGME training approved. It's a pain (from what I understand), but it doesn't really have much to do with how AOA versus ACGME programs are viewed, nor does it really affect anyone who wants to train in either model and practice in those states (in the big scheme of things).

Two parts.

1. We talked about it during my interview at WVCOM, where the panel if interviewers agreed (all DO's) that it'll most likely happen now that the curricula are very similar. They said it'll be the top pressing issue of our generation.

2. DO's are quickly straying towards the realm of contemporary medicine, with everything but OMM being the same. Since most DO's don't actually practice a single bit of OMM, is there really a difference?
It really doesn't matter what a panel of DO clinicians thinks ... it's up to what the AOA will do, and these docs aren't the ones who will become higher ups in the AOA. Frankly, it makes zero sense for the AOA to merge or effectively destroy itself. I don't think anyone should count on a merger or degree designation change in our lifetime ... nor should it be anywhere near as pressing as issues like rapidly expanding DO schools, lack of expanding OGME spots, any further HINTS of for-profit DO models, etc, etc, etc.
 

willen101383

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Two parts.

1. We talked about it during my interview at WVCOM, where the panel if interviewers agreed (all DO's) that it'll most likely happen now that the curricula are very similar. They said it'll be the top pressing issue of our generation.

2. DO's are quickly straying towards the realm of contemporary medicine, with everything but OMM being the same. Since most DO's don't actually practice a single bit of OMM, is there really a difference?
Wow so you did actually interview at some DO schools? Whats with all the hate from pre allo then?

All feelings aside I agree with #2... I sort of feel as though once the old guard is gone things will change...although there still are a few die hard DO students in each class who will likely re populate the AOA and prevent this.
 

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My mom is a nurse and she tells me that she has never (knowingly) worked with a DO, so she is concerned that if I choose the DO route, I will have more of a struggle finding work. Is this true? I'm new to learning a lot about DO, so I'd just like to clarify that.


Edit: Obviously she hasn't worked in every hospital in the country, let alone the city and she knows that she can't speak for a DO. My focus here is on whether or not DO's are just as capable of finding work anywhere that MD's are working.
Questions like these are so unspecific that they're unanswerable. There are many specialties and therefore, many jobs. Please get specific. Also, there is plenty of figure-it-out yourself data available (http://www.nrmp.org/data/resultsanddata2010.pdf).

The safest proposition is to be excellent, regardless of MD/DO status. Incompetent folks will always have precarious careers.
 

Dr Fraggle

All Work and All Play
Nov 30, 2010
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I think you're talking about the famous 5 states/resolution 42 debacle??? I can't go into much detail, but essentially, you either need to do a DO internship, or get the first year of ACGME training approved. It's a pain (from what I understand), but it doesn't really have much to do with how AOA versus ACGME programs are viewed, nor does it really affect anyone who wants to train in either model and practice in those states (in the big scheme of things).
Yes, if your acgme residency does not meet the requirements, then it can be a hassle to get licensed. Which is why if you wish to practice in one of those states, it is best to settle the issue in residency as opposed to years later when you move there. ;). I imagine that it might be a question during application. Ie do you meet the requirements for licensure in this state?
 

TriagePreMed

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Yes, if your acgme residency does not meet the requirements, then it can be a hassle to get licensed. Which is why if you wish to practice in one of those states, it is best to settle the issue in residency as opposed to years later when you move there. ;). I imagine that it might be a question during application. Ie do you meet the requirements for licensure in this state?
Last I heard 99.9% of those that applied got it eventually.
 

JaggerPlate

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May 28, 2007
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Last I heard 99.9% of those that applied got it eventually.
Yeah, I wasn't trying to be a dick ... but that was my point; I don't think I've ever heard of a ACGME PGY-1 that didn't meet resolution 42 requirements.
 
Aug 5, 2010
809
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I've only heard of this happening in a few fields and (more specifically) a few fields IN a few states. Most of the time, it seems like AOA or ACGME board certification is satisfactory.
His explanation is, "Sometimes they care because there is generally less variance in the quality of a ACGME program than the AOA programs, so they're a safer bet. Generally, universities care a lot more, but an ACGME programs put more employers at ease outside of academia as well. That doesn't mean there aren't a lot of quality AOA programs."

This just just one guys opinion, so take it for what it's worth.
 

Dr Yiot

7+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2009
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Can we ban the pre-med with a Dr. name and no status?
i actually like to think that i contribute to these boards often with constructive help. just cause i post some bs sometimes i don't think it hurts anyone. but honestly this thread is worthless. why would DO's ever have a hard time finding employment. the pcp i worked for opened up her own practice 7 or 8 months ago and has almost a thousand patients and about 800 of them are well established (shes a DO). my point is this country is so low on doctors and now everyone and their mother is gonna have insurance so no PHYSICIAN employment let alone the DO initials will in by no way shape or form affect your employment. this thread is another dumb question on these boards. I figuered a Medical Student like yourself would probably steer clear of such obvious threads like this?:thumbdown:

o and my status is pre med its right in my sig
 

MLT2MT2DO

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Jan 21, 2008
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His explanation is, "Sometimes they care because there is generally less variance in the quality of a ACGME program than the AOA programs, so they're a safer bet. Generally, universities care a lot more, but an ACGME programs put more employers at ease outside of academia as well. That doesn't mean there aren't a lot of quality AOA programs."

This just just one guys opinion, so take it for what it's worth.
I'm guessing there are many ACGME crappy residencies much the same way there are crappy AOA residencies. The stigma does exists (in certain areas of the country) but I'm guessing it is based on ignorance more than anything.