Dental916

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Are there any implant residencies or are they more of a CE implant courses which don't give you as much hands on?

Is it possible to get into an implant residency right after dental school?
 

54807

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Are there any implant residencies or are they more of a CE implant courses which don't give you as much hands on?

Is it possible to get into an implant residency right after dental school?
http://www.llu.edu/llu/dentistry/implant/

Loma Linda has an implant "residency". I'd actually like to hear more about this....as it's not actually a recognized specialty.

So perhaps it's just 3 years of implants all day long. Seems cool. Seems kinda long to be doing it for 3 years....

Why not do Perio or OS at a country club program?
 

armorshell

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Just by glancing over the program description, it seems they cover both surgical and restorative implant dentistry in depth. Still, 3 years seems a little long since there are definitely prosth programs that do just that and more in 3 years.
 

NileBDS

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Just by glancing over the program description, it seems they cover both surgical and restorative implant dentistry in depth. Still, 3 years seems a little long since there are definitely prosth programs that do just that and more in 3 years.
If I were interested in implants, and Loma Linda had a program, I'd be banging down their door. These folks have the good stuff when it comes to implant research and clinical trials. I bet they would let you do just the one year fellowship, if it weren't that competitive.

On the same note, I think implants (Dento-alveolar Implantology) is not that far away from becoming our 10th ADA recognized specialty (with geriatrics to follow in a close #11).

BU has a decent program, and Harvard just started their own this year. Makes me wonder ...

http://dentalschool.bu.edu/bulletin/postdoc/programs-implant.html

http://www.hsdm.harvard.edu/news/Harvard_Dental_Implant_Program.pdf
 
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Dental916

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all these programs require some type of previous speciality such as perio, prosth etc. So I guess these are not for fresh dds graduates.
 

54807

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On the same note, I think implants (Dento-alveolar Implantology) is not that far away from becoming our 10th ADA recognized specialty (with geriatrics to follow in a close #11).
Is this something we want? Most dentists who place implants say they're easy to place as long as you take the time to plan and choose cases appropriatly.

More training always drives up costs to patients... i wonder if the patients would yield much benefit.

Are perio, omfs, prosth, gpr, AEGD, ENDO!!! programs not producing enough implant knowledge/experience??
 

NileBDS

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Is this something we want? Most dentists who place implants say they're easy to place as long as you take the time to plan and choose cases appropriatly.

More training always drives up costs to patients... i wonder if the patients would yield much benefit.

Are perio, omfs, prosth, gpr, AEGD, ENDO!!! programs not producing enough implant knowledge/experience??

You know, I think you make great points. To be honest, I never viewed it that way (patient cost).

I am tired of perio/omfs/endo and who knows who else, all claiming to be implant specialists. It's no-man's-land now.
 

Mask80

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Loma Linda has a decent program, but other than the time (3 years is a lot), It is actually quite expensive. There's a program in NYU too, although that's more of a CE format for 2 years, it's more for practicing dentists.
I think anybody who has the training should do implants, however, what most general dentists who do implants tell me, your scope is pretty limited without good training in sinus lifts and bone grafting. Maybe that would justify the residency, but still, why would you spend 3 years to learn that, plus the money. Some GPR's have an optional second year with implant training. I think that would be an excellent option for you. I think there's one in UIC (chicago).
 

lchd2215

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Hi,
I am looking at implant - residencies / continuing education programs.
I am aware of the 3 yr at LLU. 2 day per week at NYU PT for 2 years.
Any other programs - max length 2 years ...I am not too crazy abt 2 day or 1 week implant training programs.

Hows the implant program at BU ??? any info,, nos of cases etc???
thanks a lot
booz
 

baddog

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Dr. SaxyDucky

Your statement that "more training drives up costs to patients" kind of hit a nerve. Don't our patients deserve to have the best trained people availiable to treat them? Wouldn't you want your Mom to be treated by the best trained dentist for the treatment she needed? If you are using the excuse of "training driving up the cost to patients"--how much does a malpractice suit cost you when you don't have such training? That's about the lamest reason not to seek additional training I have ever seen!
 

Pulpal Insult

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baddog,
I totally agree! I knew somelthing didn't sit well when I saw that comment. I'm sure SaxyDucky (school administrator?) meant well, but I couldn't help from thinking that this is the mentality that pervades the higher levels, uh... all levels of academia. Most institutional types never see the world beyond their cozy campus setting. Capitalism works. It may not be perfect in a given snapshot but it is perfect when viewed over time. Yes, it will cost more initially to get more training, etc., but over time it will set loose the market forces needed to bring down the cost to all of our patients. Think supply-side economics.:thumbup:
 

shabu2

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I think he was referring to the fact that there are plenty of other specialties and programs that already teach implant placement/restoration in Perio, OMFS, Prostho, and Endo. Why add more? If interested, pick an already established residency program. These are 3,4-6yrs.
 
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I was a GP, I would refer patients who need implants to either a periodontist or an oral surgeon because the practice is limited to either perio or OMFS. I think it would be a lot harder for an implantologist to get referrals from GPs…. especially when this implantologist also restores the implants and does dental fillings, crowns and bridges in his/her practice.
 

Rube

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Could someone explain to me why a 3-year residency or even a 2-year residency would be necessary to do a proceedure which is already very predicitable and getting easier every year?
 

loldds

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Could someone explain to me why a 3-year residency or even a 2-year residency would be necessary to do a proceedure which is already very predicitable and getting easier every year?
I agree. Implants do not require a three year residency. I've assisted on several implant procedures and they really aren't that complicated.

I also have prosth faculty insisting that GPs will and should be placing their own. Granted there are a range of difficulties and the tough cases will be referred, but implants are becoming much simpler
 
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It may be easy to place an implant but it is very difficult to fix a badly placed implant due to poor treatment planning (ie bad angulation, too many unparallel implants in an edentulous space, bone grafting was not done when it was indicated, lack of interocclusal space for restoration etc). Once an implant is integrated, it is very difficult to remove.

I think 2-3 years of implant training is the right amount of time.
 
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aphistis

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It may be easy to place an implant but it is very difficult to fix a badly placed implant due to poor treatment planning (ie bad angulation, too many unparallel implants in an edentulous space, bone grafting was not done when it was indicated, lack of interocclusal space for restoration etc). Once an implant is integrated, it is very difficult to remove.

I think 2-3 years of implant training is the right amount of time.
That makes sense until you realize the general dentist (or prosthodontist) should be the one formulating the big-picture plan to begin with, and should therefore already be the one considering the factors you mention. I grant that's not always how it happens right now, but it's not the oral surgeon or periodontist's job to create or even supervise our treatment plans for us.
 
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That makes sense until you realize the general dentist (or prosthodontist) should be the one formulating the big-picture plan to begin with, and should therefore already be the one considering the factors you mention. I grant that's not always how it happens right now, but it's not the oral surgeon or periodontist's job to create or even supervise our treatment plans for us.
I agree. The dentist (or prosth) is the captain of the implant team. But in the real world, not every GP has the knowledge (that most prosthodontists have) to formulate the big-picture plan….many GPs have to rely on periodontists or OS for implant treatment planning.