Can Someone Give me Advice on Anatomy?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Thomas Hearns, Mar 1, 2007.

  1. Thomas Hearns

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    Ok I'm not doing THAT bad in the class... I'm probably sitting around a C+, B- with one test left, the final, 40% of the class grade. I am not enrolled in the lab, but have access to open labs. Anyway, I suck at memorizing. I like chemistry, understanding concepts and applying them, but I guess I just really am not good at memorizing all these nerves, veins, arteries, etc. Anyone have any advice that will make things easier for me? Last time, I read through ALL the notes, twice. Didn't help me out too much, probably information overload, couldn't keep track of what was really important. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks :)
     
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  3. TheAmazingGOB

    TheAmazingGOB It ain't easy bein' white
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    Unfortunately with anatomy, it is strictly memorization. There are few shortcuts other than creating pneumonics to help you memorize pathways or muscle groups. There are some patterns of organization seen throughout the body, but there are also subtle differences in each system. The best advice I have for you is to organize your time well and assume you will have to block off an hour or two every day to study anatomy. As long as you stay caught up, the bulk of information shouldn't be overwhelming. Sorry if this wasn't much help, but hang in there and good luck!
     
  4. inside_edition

    inside_edition Waitlisted Member
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    if it's just identifying the structures, then you should just focus for a split second on each structure and name. Go through every single structure this way and repeat at least ten times (not just twice).

    back when i had anatomy (actually, it was comparative anatomy), I would get caught up on Why the f*** do i have to learn about cats and sharks?

    I probably wasted more than half my study time just being pissed off about learning useless stuff.
     
  5. DocYuki

    DocYuki The Gamer Student
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    A huge banner hung over my Jr. High band-room that I will never, ever forget because its simple message permeates so much when it comes to our path.

    "Repetition is the Mother of Study"

    Depending on individual abilities/talents/IQ, one may have to do more repetition than others, but whether its rote facts or doing MCAT practice questions, this seems awfully helpful in medicine :)
     
  6. PlayMeSomeMusic

    PlayMeSomeMusic Always waiting...
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    What worked best for me was getting together with another person in my cadaver group. We went over things (one day bones one day muscles and that better we knew it the more we covered in one session) everyday for like an hour about 3 weeks before the exam.. By the end it was easy.
     
  7. Lshapley

    Lshapley Old Man Med Student
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    I do well with active reading. While I am looking over the presentations from class, or the notes, I like to paraphrase in another notebook all of the information I will be tested on. I never look at this notebook again, but the act of writing down the information and having to phrase it in my own words helps it stick. I also make flash cards of all of the most important stuff that I need to definitely memorize detail for detail.
     
  8. Thomas Hearns

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    Thanks guys... any more tips from any of you?
     
  9. mac_kin

    mac_kin Senior Member
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    Hey! I would suggest an anatomy coloring book for you. Or just use the textbook you have and cover up all the labels with post-its. Then go through and try to remember the name of each structure. I found that writing the names out on paper, like 20 times each, really helped me. You'll need to know how to spell them anyway, so why not? Just make sure that you're not just memorizing the list of words but actually looking at the structure and trying to remember what it is. You'll need to do this for a while - like 2+ weeks, daily, before the test. Soon enough you'll be able to open the book, look at a picture and name everything on it. And once you go back to the cadaver lab it will be a lot easier to remember everything.

    Good Luck!!
     
  10. Critical Mass

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    Get used to memorizing nerves.
     
  11. Quix

    Quix Herr Professor
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    So, what should they do once they're done with the lungs? ;)

    In all seriousness, it is about pure memorization (I've actually found it easier to approach memorizing anatomy and physiology through pathophysiology, but that's just me). Mnemonics can be useful, too - I remember Kaplan teaching SEVEN-UP, instance.
     

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