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Can Someone please tell me if this is true.....

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by drpduck, Oct 11, 2001.

  1. drpduck

    drpduck Senior Member
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    Yesterday at the Pre-Med society at my school, we had a guest speaker, who happend to be a urologist. He brought up many interesting points about being a doctor. One in particular deals with college. According to him, it is more important to take classes like history, philosophy, psychology and english so you can be well rounded, understand people and communicate better. Of course he said to take science classes so you can get a good score on the MCAT, but he said Med schools don't care whether you take molecular biology or not. He also said med schools like to see you do things you are passionate about, instead of doing things that would just look good for med school, like clinical experience or research (unless you really like it). So I'm wondering if all of this is true. Would it be more beneficial to me to major in biology and minor in something like history or philosophy, rather then just majoring in biology. Thanks a lot for your help.
    Donald
     
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  3. tBw

    tBw totally deluded
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    some people say one thing, some people say another. Admissions people are human (at least I think they are...) so different people are impressed by different things. One thing that certainly IS true is that you will work harder, and therefore do better, at things you enjoy. I would apply this to both your course selection and your choice of extra-curriculas.

    best wishes,

    onwis
     
  4. Legend

    Legend Super Senior Member
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    I guess the doctor is partly true.
    One thing I don't understand is how someone can be well-rounded by merely taking CLASSES in the areas of history, philosophy, etc.
    I am sure there are many well-rounded people who have never taken any history courses but know a great deal about it. Additionally, a friend of mine (a premed) is an avid reader of Kant's works but he hates taking philosophy courses. In my opinion, if you really want to understand people better, real-life experience (whatever you do) would be the most practical.
     
  5. lilninja

    lilninja Senior Member
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    One thing to remember is that college is not meant to be a 4-year application to medical school. You should major in a science only if that's where your area of interest is. It doesn't hurt you to be form a different major, and I think some admissions committees might find it refreshing to see someone who didn't keep their curriculum narrow. On the other hand, about the molecular biology question - I think many of the schools I have applied to either required or highly recommended a semester in molecular biology (I think this is evident of the changing of the times, cloning, etc.), and also biochemistry. Other than the pre-reqs and those two I mentioned, you should take whatever you want to, this is the only time you'll have the opportunity to have such a broad curriculum. (oh, and I think calculus is also highly recommended or required). Hope this helps.
     
  6. leorl

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    It really doesn't matter what you major in. If you are not interested in history,psychology,anthropology,sociology,communications,etc etc etc, don't minor just to look good for med school or feel better for being "well-rounded." But don't just feel you have to stick within your biology major either...do what really interests you. Psychology is fascinating :). I didn't minor. Instead, I triple-majored. That's how interested I was in other things.
     
  7. SocialistMD

    SocialistMD Resident Objectivist
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    Well, I think you are missing the point, there, Donald. If you are passionate about history or philosophy, then you should take more classes in those areas. If you are not, but still take those classes, you are still doing it to impress the admissions committees in some sort of reverse-psychology way.

    Take the courses you enjoy. If all you like is science, then just take science courses. I have classmates who were music and art majors because they are subjects about which they are passionate. The advice given by the urologist is very sound. As long as you take the prerequisites, the rest of your schedule is yours to do with as you please.
     
  8. AJM

    AJM SDN Moderator
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    I completely agree with what the urologist said. When he was discussing that students should try to be well-rounded, I don't think he was trying to say that they should do it to be stronger med school applicants. He meant that you are going to have med school, residency, and your entire career to be studying and practicing medicine. College is the main chance you get to immerse yourself in areas outside of medicine and science. Many people I know who were strict biology majors or strict science majors now regret that they didn't take more classes in philosophy, the arts or other areas because all they are doing now is science.

    I would not recommend doing something just because you think it would look good to admissions committees. However, I do recommend going out on a limb and trying out classes or experiences that you are unfamiliar with. It is these things that add to your own life experiences. Lastly, do what interests you, not what you think will interest others. If you pursue what you are interested in, you will do better at it and become more involved.

    Lilninja was right on the mark when he/she said that college should not just be a 4-year application to medical school.
     

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