Can you match with a different graduating class?

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by ppp, Apr 4, 2001.

  1. ppp

    ppp New Member

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    Does anyone know if it is possible to match for a residency program that is with the class below you? For example, if you match with a 1 year internship, then want to match again for a residency (that's not linked to the internship), then can you try to match again with the year below you?? Or how do you get a residency after that???
     
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  3. Sure...you can do one of two things:

    1) if your intended specialty is a PGY2 match (ie, Rad Onc, some Anesth, EM, etc.) then you apply for BOTH your intern/PGY1 and your PGY2 spots at the same time, during the same match season

    2) if you only matched for a PGY1 spot or are unsure as to what you want to pursue, then you go through the match again, but for a PGY2 spot in your field of choice. Should you be applying for a field that does not give "credit" to your PGY1 spot, you will be applying for first year positions (although you will technically be a PGY2)again. There will be some PGY2 spots open (ie, in fields with PGY1 starts) due to attrition.

    The best option is to hope to simply score a position at the place where you are doing your internship thus avoiding the whole NRMP process.

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    I'm not sure if PGY1s can reapply through the NRMP match to get a different PGY1 spot. But you can and probably do go through the NRMP match to get a PGY2 spot. That's generally what happens.

    For example: MS4 applied to NOTHING but Derm programs. Finds out the Monday of the week of Match Day that he didn't match. MS4 scrambles to find a preliminary spot in (usually Medicine if he wants Derm, or Surgery, or Transitional Year). MS4 graduates and becomes PGY1. As a PGY1 in a preliminary spot, he has the option of 1) going for a PGY2 spot in the same department where he's started (going for a categorical spot that may not have filled with the original match), 2) reapplying through NRMP for Derm or other programs which begins PGY2, or 3) applying for one of those PGY2 programs that don't participate (or has an option to sign) in the NRMP match -- the early matches through San Francisco Match don't participate in the NRMP match and you'd reapply through SF, I believe.



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    Tim Wu.
     
  5. I don't see any restrictions to that in the NRMP manual and had always assumed this was the way that people who wanted to switch to another specialty (which didn't accept their first year) or who didn't match or scramble into a position did it. Have you heard otherwise Tim?
     
  6. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    What I have heard is that switching fields is next to impossible, but I suppose that's for someone who's already boarded in something (HCFA funding and all).

    The scramble occurs through NRMP too? I had no idea how that worked, to be honest. I haven't heard anything in the way of 1s not being able to use the NRMP match for reapplication, but just assumed that that's not how it worked.



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    Tim Wu.
     
  7. That is largely true. Unfortunately, HCFA funding rules give advantage to those who start in longer residencies, ie: surgical training. For example, you would be able to switch mid-stream (provided you find a spot) if you started a Gen Surg residency (which funds you for 5 years) then decided to switch to a 3 year EM program in PGY2 - you would still have 4 years of HCFA funding left. And for those stellar candidates, I've been told programs *may* overlook the loss of extra funding (but don't count on it). However, the reverse is not true - as the regulations stand it appears to be next to impossible to switch from a shorter residency (ie, EM) to a longer one without your new program losing funds for you during the last couple of years.

    The way I understand the scramble to works is as follows:

    The day after everyone finds out whether or not they matched, those who are enrolled in the NRMP and have a user id and password can log onto the NRMP site and get information about Unfilled programs.

    After noon on that day, unmatched applicants are allowed to start contacting programs to secure a residency spot. During this process, you can use ERAS to transfer your applications to programs to which you did not originally apply. There is no charge for this service, provided it takes place during a certain period (ie, I think they only allow you to do it for a couple of days, and am not sure if there is a limit on how many apps you can transfer for free. However, it is only available for those who enrolled in the NRMP, used ERAS and were unmatched. It is not available for those not enrolled.)

    Now technically I do not believe you have to be enrolled in the NRMP to participate in the scramble as long as you can obtain a list of the unfilled programs and send them your information yourself. I am sure this is how many people obtain spots outside of the match - people who either couldn't finish their stuff in time for the NRMP or were otherwise unable to participate in the match.

    The NRMP rules state that if you are matched to a program, you are contracted to start your residency there. Every year, however, matched applicants look at the list of Unfilled programs and see "better" spots listed there and try to get out of their NRMP contract. To be honest, I'm sure this happens and I am NOT sure what the consequences are. NRMP regulations say that if you do no accept the position you matched to you are unable to enroll in the match or scramble for a position for 1 calendar year. I am not sure how they get the information - if there is some reporting that the programs do, etc. if students do not accept the positions offered them. I suppose it would be up to the program to report that Student X did not accept the match position offered. If they could fill the spot right away perhaps it isn't a problem.

    Since I have been curious about this issue over the last couple of years I have seen people asking about getting out of their NRMO contract, I think I'll try and find out when I start in July.

    I can find no regulations preventing people from matching into a PGY1 spot then using the NRMP for future spots. As a matter of fact, on the interview trail I met a PGY3 who was wanting to switch programs mid-stream (from 1 surgery program to another, so HCFA funding was not a problem). He had the approval of his PD and Chair and they let him know which programs had openings, and he applied for PGY3 spots through the NRMP at these programs. Not sure how you note this - if you state in your personal statement or what. Maybe I was confused about this. But I do know there is no restriction on using the NRMP to get PGY2 spots in programs that list PGY2 openings.

    Does that make sense? [​IMG]

    Anyway, that's my take.

    [/B][/QUOTE]

     
  8. premedmijo

    premedmijo Senior Member

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    What do you guys mean when you say 'scramble' for a position?
     
  9. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    If you've ever had a roach infestation, imagine that when you turn on the kitchen light you see all these roaches scatter. Imagine MS4s who didn't match to a program, in a panic, and when the green light turns on for them to find a spot for next year (a residency) they SCRAMBLE. [​IMG]

    It's just jargon for an unmatched MS4 who's looking for a spot -- any spot -- for his first internship year.



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    Tim Wu.
     

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