Apr 6, 2010
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Hey everyone,
I was curious, it seems like a large contingent of the international students at Irish medical schools are Canadian. Why is this the case? It appears that about 2/3rds of Irish grads who are Canadian match back which seems quite good, does anyone have any idea if this number is going to increase or decrease in future years? Also, is it the case that pretty much everyone who fails(or does not want) to match in Canada ends up in the States? Are there any cases of individuals who struggle for a few years before matching and if so, do medical schools in Ireland assist such students with their goal of returning to North America?

Thank you
 

med2UCC

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I never thought I'd say this, and in a tone of exasperation, but use the search function. This has just been discussed, this week.
Canadians go to Ireland because a) there are spots there reserved for us b) the schools have good reputations c) we can match back home from there and d) there are other Canadians there saying come on in, the water's fine.
The Irish schools do nothing to help you match.
They don't teach to the USMLE or the MCCEE.
Yes, sometimes people stay in Ireland for 1-2 years or more, for a variety of reasons. I have never met a Canadian who could not match back home, ever.
Some go to the US, either because of preference or because they think it will be easier to match into the program of their choice there.
Cheers,
M
 

Handsome88

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May 15, 2009
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I never thought I'd say this, and in a tone of exasperation, but use the search function. This has just been discussed, this week.
Canadians go to Ireland because a) there are spots there reserved for us b) the schools have good reputations c) we can match back home from there and d) there are other Canadians there saying come on in, the water's fine.
The Irish schools do nothing to help you match.
They don't teach to the USMLE or the MCCEE.
Yes, sometimes people stay in Ireland for 1-2 years or more, for a variety of reasons. I have never met a Canadian who could not match back home, ever.
Some go to the US, either because of preference or because they think it will be easier to match into the program of their choice there.
Cheers,
M
Do you happen to know if Irish schools give you enough time to study for the USMLE? I heart that Trinity only has 2 month summer vacation (correct me if I'm wrong pls), which is not enough to study for the USMLE in my opinion. Also it is not enough to do a research project or shadow doctors back in Canada.
 

med2UCC

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When I was in Ireland doing the 5 year program in Cork, we had 4 months off between years 1-2 and 2-3, then 3 months off thereafter (usually June-August). Sometimes it was only 10 weeks by the time orals were done and depending on when we had to be back in August. Most people who did the USMLE's either studied through the summer and wrote in the fall or studied through the school year and wrote when they felt like it. Everyone did fine. Likewise those of us who were studying for the MCCEE. We studied through the late part of the summer and early fall and then wrote the thing.
No school is going to give you time off to study for an exam in a different medical system in a different country. The Irish schools are training doctors for Ireland, not the US or Canada. They let some of us in for the money, not so they can serve as degree mills for Canada and the US and certainly not for love. get your head around this and you'll do fine. Don't and you'll be one of the bitter ones.
As for research, I know one person who did 3 different research projects in the summer before final med and through that year while doing 12 weeks of electives (over the summer). She also got the highest score I've ever heard about on the MCCEE and aced her USMLE step 2 CK. If you work, you can make it work out for you.
Cheers,
M
 
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Jocks

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I heart that Trinity only has 2 month summer vacation (correct me if I'm wrong pls), which is not enough to study for the USMLE in my opinion. Also it is not enough to do a research project or shadow doctors back in Canada.
which is not enough to study for the USMLE in my opinion.
Yes it is, we all do it.


Also it is not enough to do a research project
Yes it is, I did it.

or shadow doctors back in Canada.
2 weeks is enough to simply shadow.

Jocks
 

Handsome88

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Yes it is, we all do it.




Yes it is, I did it.



2 weeks is enough to simply shadow.

Jocks
Thnx jocks, but after reading on the forums about how people study for the USMLE, I saw that most US students study 3 months at least to get 230+(which is the average for an IMG to get if we're looking for competitive specialities). So I think we need at least the same amount of time if not more.
What was ur score?
 
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Yes it is, I did it.
I have to say 2 months isn't a ton of time to do a research project unless it's pretty well packaged and ready to go before you get there. It would also depend on the type of project etc. I don't know what would be sufficient to receive credit, but the type of project would definitely dictate your success in 2 months. I'd say unless you have a good idea of what you can contribute in 2 months and how well organized the project is, be careful what you get yourself into.
 

Arb

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US students are lucky to get 4 weeks off to do Step 1 so I don't know where you get 3 months. To be honest, 3 months is too long as you will burn out by the end.

As for research projects, make sure you do a clinical project. A couple months will get your name on the paper easily. Again, you will get more time off than any student studying in the US to do research.