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Hey guys I’m a DACA student that just got accepted off the waitlist into NYMC not too long ago. I just found out the school won’t certify my private loan. Under the school’s policy, I am considered an international student, because of this I am required to pay out of pocket like an international student. Are there any international students on here that have some advice? I’m feeling very crushed as this is my only acceptance. I don’t know what to do I’m reaching out to anyone and everyone for help. The first person I talked to in the financial aid office gave me no problems so I was under the impression I could. The next time I called I was told a different answer. I even spoke with the guy in charge of financial aid. I feel very hopeless. After posting on the premed Reddit I was given a lot of good suggestions. I’m thinking of emailing or visiting the dean of the school to speak to him. If I can I’ll defer a year so I can get married to my fiancé and obtain a green card, but I’m not sure how long that will take. I’ve also sent out emails to senators and representatives. My last resort would be a GoFundMe. Does anyone have any other ideas? I’m desperate for a way out of this situation.
 
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KnightDoc

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NYMC is not the bad guy here. OP is not in this country legally, what is a medical school supposed to do about that? DACA is just kicking the can down the road and delaying deportation for people brought here illegally as kids; delaying deportation does not mean they are here legally. Federal law will have to change to make them legal residents, not NYMC policy.
Actually, I think NYMC is the bad guy here. Regardless of anyone's political views on DACA, it is a fact of life, and millions of people are here, working, paying taxes, etc. If NYMC was not receptive to DACA, as many schools aren't, they should have said so on the front end and not accepted the application and the secondary fee.

But, that is not the case here, because NYMC does accept foreign students. Someone in admissions failing to put 2+2 together and realize that a DACA is not in the same position as a child of a wealthy family from abroad is totally on the school. Refusing to certify a PRIVATE loan to make it possible for OP to attend is totally on the school. Requiring all four years upfront, from a DACA resident, is totally on the school.

Could OP really be deported at any time? Probably not. Trump and the Republicans had 4 years, and they didn't do it. Whether they ever get a path to legal citizenship or not, they are very likely never going anywhere. Can a DACA end up leaving them with an empty seat? Of course, but so could anyone else. Is a DACA more likely to? I don't know, but that should be the school's problem after issuing an acceptance.

We'll have to agree to disagree here, because, in my eyes, the school absolutely is the bad guy here. Until the situation arose, how the hell is OP supposed to know that the school won't certify a private loan for a DACA, because a DACA is neither a citizen nor a Green Card holder? That's why federal loans are unavailable, but, if Sallie Mae will lend, what good reason does NYMC have demanding all its money up front from a resident, with DACA status (not someone living in the shadows), with an approved loan?
 
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No, OP is not here legally, just like marijuana is not legal federally. The feds just choose not to deport DACA recipients and choose not to raid marijuana dispensaries. They could change their mind tomorrow with an executive order.

Source: Fact Sheet: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) - National Immigration Forum

The politics of the DACA program is beyond the scope of this post, but OP is not a legal resident of the US. That is a fact. Whether or not that fact is fair is not relevant to this post.
Actually, DACA is a legal status, just like someone who is here on a visa. OP doesn't need to be a citizen or permanent resident to be here legally. DACA is a policy that allows people to be present and to work, subject to extension or expiration. Like a visa.

Someone who has been granted DACA is NOT "illegal" under present law, as ordered by a federal court in December 2020 (under President Trump), and OP absolutely is here legally, even though OP is neither a citizen nor a permanent resident! Whether or not that fact is fair is not relevant to this post. :)
 
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Hey guys I’m a DACA student that just got accepted off the waitlist into NYMC not too long ago. I just found out the school won’t certify my private loan. Under the school’s policy, I am considered an international student, because of this I am required to pay out of pocket like an international student. Are there any international students on here that have some advice? I’m feeling very crushed as this is my only acceptance. I don’t know what to do I’m reaching out to anyone and everyone for help. The first person I talked to in the financial aid office gave me no problems so I was under the impression I could. The next time I called I was told a different answer. I even spoke with the guy in charge of financial aid. I feel very hopeless. After posting on the premed Reddit I was given a lot of good suggestions. I’m thinking of emailing or visiting the dean of the school to speak to him. If I can I’ll defer a year so I can get married to my fiancé and obtain a green card, but I’m not sure how long that will take. I’ve also sent out emails to senators and representatives. My last resort would be a GoFundMe. Does anyone have any other ideas? I’m desperate for a way out of this situation.

A marriage green card can take between 1-3 years. In your case it might take 1 so deferral might be an option.
 
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A marriage green card can take between 1-3 years. In your case it might take 1 so deferral might be an option.
Yeah that’s my worry. Even if I do it that way, that it might not be done quickly enough for it to matter for next year. I might find myself in the same situation again even if I manage to defer.
 
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Hey guys I’m a DACA student that just got accepted off the waitlist into NYMC not too long ago. I just found out the school won’t certify my private loan. Under the school’s policy, I am considered an international student, because of this I am required to pay out of pocket like an international student. Are there any international students on here that have some advice? I’m feeling very crushed as this is my only acceptance. I don’t know what to do I’m reaching out to anyone and everyone for help. The first person I talked to in the financial aid office gave me no problems so I was under the impression I could. The next time I called I was told a different answer. I even spoke with the guy in charge of financial aid. I feel very hopeless. After posting on the premed Reddit I was given a lot of good suggestions. I’m thinking of emailing or visiting the dean of the school to speak to him. If I can I’ll defer a year so I can get married to my fiancé and obtain a green card, but I’m not sure how long that will take. I’ve also sent out emails to senators and representatives. My last resort would be a GoFundMe. Does anyone have any other ideas? I’m desperate for a way out of this situation.
I don't understand this, and think you should run this up the chain, all the way to the dean of the school if necessary. I totally understand the politics of not allowing you to have access to taxpayer funded and guaranteed federal loans, but, if a private lender is willing to lend, what policy would compel a school that is willing to accept you to refuse to certify the loan? It costs the school nothing, correct?

Something doesn't sound right. Are you SURE you are talking about PRIVATE loans? If so, again, this makes no sense!
 
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I don't understand this, and think you should run this up the chain, all the way to the dean of the school if necessary. I totally understand the politics of not allowing you to have access to taxpayer funded and guaranteed federal loans, but, if a private lender is willing to lend, what policy would compel a school that is willing to accept you to refuse to certify the loan? It costs the school nothing, correct?

Something doesn't sound right. Are you SURE you are talking about PRIVATE loans? If so, again, this makes no sense!
Yes I asked them about Sallie Mae and other private medical school loans. I didn’t make sense to me either and it doesn’t sound right you’re absolutely right. I can’t use loans because of that policy they have in place. This is the link to their policy: https://www.nymc.edu/media/schools-...tofTuitionandFeesByForeignMedicalStudents.pdf
 
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Have you asked about scholarships? Daca students may be barred from federal loans but not from institutional grants and scholarships. My guess is Sallie Mae will not loan tuition for 4 years upfront but you could ask. Have you reached out to the dean of students or the office of diversity at NYMC? Now is the time for a full court press - you’re going to need to find as many allies as possible. The schools offices and staff for diversity initiatives would likely be able to provide more guidance. I seem to remember some gofundme for daca students last year.
 
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Yes I asked them about Sallie Mae and other private medical school loans. I didn’t make sense to me either and it doesn’t sound right you’re absolutely right. I can’t use loans because of that policy they have in place. This is the link to their policy: https://www.nymc.edu/media/schools-...tofTuitionandFeesByForeignMedicalStudents.pdf
Got it! This makes a little more sense, because they are asking for all 4 years up front, or the first two years, with a third party guarantee for the balance, which you neglected to mention in your OP. The reason for this is that a non-citizen or permanent resident is at a greater risk of not receiving guaranteed funding in the future, since you can't access federal guaranteed loans. This sort of guarantees that you won't withdraw for financial reasons, at least for the first two years. They do need this, because, if anyone leaves, they are stuck with an empty, non-revenue producing seat, plus it represents one less doctor being created to meet the doctor shortage.

I'm just thinking outside the box here, since you asked for ideas in your OP :), but, do you actually have private loans lined up and approved, which was implied in your OP ("I just found out the school won’t certify my private loan.")? If so, an effective work around might be to explain the situation to the lender and receive a 4-year guarantee to originate the loans, subject to a disbursement schedule dictated by the school, contingent on the school certifying the loan.

Another thought might be to ask the lender to fund all 4 years up front due to your unique situation, again, subject to loan certification. This would cost you a lot more in interest, which should make the lender happy. If the lender is willing to work with you, you might even be able to negotiate a discount (partial scholarship) with the school to compensate you for the additional interest you will have to pay.

If the school won't acknowledge that your situation is very different from that of a wealthy foreigner with the means to pay upfront, and is simply unwilling to work with you, then, unfortunately, the acceptance was a mirage, and my advice would be to get your Green Card and start over. It's easy for me to say since I am not in your situation, but, if any institution treated me like this, I wouldn't want a deferral in order to kill myself obtaining money just to hand it over to them!

If you take the time to build a stronger application while waiting for the Green Card, you are almost certain to have better results, because you will also be able to apply to the universe of schools that wouldn't consider you as a DACA. There are relatively few citizens with the means to fund 4 years, out of pocket, upfront, and NYMC knows this, which is why it's not required.

Their policy is designed to guarantee payment from foreigners, and, by definition, closes the door to all but the wealthiest among them. It is highly unlikely that any DACA could do this, and they HAD to know this.

Trust me, you have overcome obstacles your entire life. If you stick with it and keep working on your application while awaiting your Green Card, you will ultimately have a much stronger application, with a really compelling story to boot, and will have much better options than NYMC, with access to federal loans, if not outright need-based or merit scholarships.

I'd never reward NYMC with my money down the road if they refused to do the right thing now (i.e., granting an exception involving institutional loans or loan certifications to fix their mistake by not giving you the proper guidance up front upon learning you are DACA). Seriously, where the hell would they expect a DACA to get 4 years' worth of tuition, fees and housing up front???

One more thought (if you have to use it, I expect a shout out on CNN! :cool:) Given what's happening now with Congress seeming to come to a consensus that some path to citizenship has to be provided, as a last resort, if all else fails, I'd ask NYMC if they thought it would be a good look if you shared your story with the NY and national media. I wouldn't be surprised if someone thought this might be a story worth telling. I also wouldn't be surprised if NYMC wouldn't want to be in the middle of it. ("DACA recipient overcomes all odds and receives an acceptance to medical school, only to be unable to attend due to federal policy prohibiting DACA from accessing federal loans, and greedy school being unwilling to certify private loans because it wants all its money, in cash, up front.")
 
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Have you asked about scholarships? Daca students may be barred from federal loans but not from institutional grants and scholarships. My guess is Sallie Mae will not loan tuition for 4 years upfront but you could ask. Have you reached out to the dean of students or the office of diversity at NYMC? Now is the time for a full court press - you’re going to need to find as many allies as possible. The schools offices and staff for diversity initiatives would likely be able to provide more guidance. I seem to remember some gofundme for daca students last year.

NYMC doesn’t have any kind of aid for international students. Everyone I spoke to at least told me no. In regards to Sallie Mae, they didn’t even let me get far enough in talking to them about it. He immediately told me it wasn’t possible. But yes you’re absolutely right I need to find more support within the school. The GoFundMe is a long shot and would be my Hail Mary if everything else fails. Thank you for your input!!
 
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Hey guys I’m a DACA student that just got accepted off the waitlist into NYMC not too long ago. I just found out the school won’t certify my private loan. Under the school’s policy, I am considered an international student, because of this I am required to pay out of pocket like an international student. Are there any international students on here that have some advice? I’m feeling very crushed as this is my only acceptance. I don’t know what to do I’m reaching out to anyone and everyone for help. The first person I talked to in the financial aid office gave me no problems so I was under the impression I could. The next time I called I was told a different answer. I even spoke with the guy in charge of financial aid. I feel very hopeless. After posting on the premed Reddit I was given a lot of good suggestions. I’m thinking of emailing or visiting the dean of the school to speak to him. If I can I’ll defer a year so I can get married to my fiancé and obtain a green card, but I’m not sure how long that will take. I’ve also sent out emails to senators and representatives. My last resort would be a GoFundMe. Does anyone have any other ideas? I’m desperate for a way out of this situation.
I believe if you get a co-signer who is a US citizen it shouldn't be a problem. I know one too many universities who accept this. NYMC is reputable and should be acknowledging this too. I am sure not everyone in med school is using only 'federal loans" to pay. So, if they are accepting private loans from other students, they should accept yours too. Maybe have your citizen fiancé be the a co-signer instead of rushing into a marriage (it may take more than a year with the new regulations regarding immigration coming out from Biden's administration). Also financial aid advisor a most school are not fully prepped to help students with variant immigration statuses- so reach out to other colleges within NYMC (Masters program, Public health students etc.) . Ask them to connect you with other DACA students.
 
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Got it! This makes a little more sense, because they are asking for all 4 years up front, or the first two years, with a third party guarantee for the balance, which you neglected to mention in your OP. The reason for this is that a non-citizen or permanent resident is at a greater risk of not receiving guaranteed funding in the future, since you can't access federal guaranteed loans. This sort of guarantees that you won't withdraw for financial reasons, at least for the first two years. They do need this, because, if anyone leaves, they are stuck with an empty, non-revenue producing seat, plus it represents one less doctor being created to meet the doctor shortage.

I'm just thinking outside the box here, since you asked for ideas in your OP :), but, do you actually have private loans lined up and approved, which was implied in your OP ("I just found out the school won’t certify my private loan.")? If so, an effective work around might be to explain the situation to the lender and receive a 4-year guarantee to originate the loans, subject to a disbursement schedule dictated by the school, contingent on the school certifying the loan.

Another thought might be to ask the lender to fund all 4 years up front due to your unique situation, again, subject to loan certification. This would cost you a lot more in interest, which should make the lender happy. If the lender is willing to work with you, you might even be able to negotiate a discount (partial scholarship) with the school to compensate you for the additional interest you will have to pay.

If the school won't acknowledge that your situation is very different from that of a wealthy foreigner with the means to pay upfront, and is simply unwilling to work with you, then, unfortunately, the acceptance was a mirage, and my advice would be to get your Green Card and start over. It's easy for me to say since I am not in your situation, but, if any institution, f***ed me over like this, I wouldn't want a deferral in order to kill myself obtaining money just to hand it over to them!

If you take the time to build a stronger application while waiting for the Green Card, you are almost certain to have better results, because you will also be able to apply to the universe of schools that wouldn't consider you as a DACA. There are relatively few citizens with the means to fund 4 years, out of pocket, upfront, and NYMC knows this, which is why it's not required.

Their policy is designed to guarantee payment from foreigners, and, by definition, closes the door to all but the wealthiest among them. It is highly unlikely that any DACA could do this, and they HAD to know this. If this was an oversight and they are unwilling to fix it, F--- them.

Trust me, you have overcome obstacles your entire life. If you stick with it and keep working on your application while awaiting your Green Card, you will ultimately have a much stronger application, with a really compelling story to boot, and will have much better options than NYMC, with access to federal loans, if not outright need-based or merit scholarships.

I'd never reward NYMC with my money down the road if they refused to do the right thing now (i.e., granting an exception involving institutional loans or loan certifications to fix their mistake by not giving you the proper guidance up front upon learning you are DACA). Seriously, where the hell would they expect a DACA to get 4 years' worth of tuition, fees and housing up front???

One more thought (if you have to use it, I expect a shout out on CNN! :cool:) Given what's happening now with Congress seeming to come to a consensus that some path to citizenship has to be provided, as a last resort, if all else fails, I'd ask NYMC if they thought it would be a good look if you shared your story with the NY and national media. I wouldn't be surprised if someone thought this might be a story worth telling. I also wouldn't be surprised if NYMC wouldn't want to be in the middle of it. ("DACA recipient overcomes all odds and receives an acceptance to medical school, only to be unable to attend due to federal policy prohibiting DACA from accessing federal loans, and greedy school being unwilling to certify private loans because it wants all its money, in cash, up front.")
Wow thank you for such a detailed post and thorough explanation!! Your suggestion for setting up a deal with my lender might be difficult but worth a shot. I was planning on using loan companies like Sallie Mae. The school kinda shut me down immediately when I mentioned a private medical school loan, but maybe if I find an individual lender I might be able to do that since it would be a personal loan and not a medical school loan. And yes I’m very disappointed in this whole situation. After my interview and their presentation on the school’s history this was the last thing I expected. And thank you for your kind words it really means a lot. As for the CNN idea I’ll remember you if it comes down to that haha. Thank you once again
 
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NYMC doesn’t have any kind of aid for international students. Everyone I spoke to at least told me no. In regards to Sallie Mae, they didn’t even let me get far enough in talking to them about it. He immediately told me it wasn’t possible. But yes you’re absolutely right I need to find more support within the school. The GoFundMe is a long shot and would be my Hail Mary if everything else fails. Thank you for your input!!
At NYMC start with these two offices for support in trying to troubleshoot this. Emphasize how excited you are about their program and how you want to try to make it work.

Also reach out to medical student associations such as the one below. They likely can connect you with others who have had to navigate similar pathways.

Look for outside scholarships particularly those geared towards students from diverse background and DACA students. Example is this: The Hispanic Health Professional Student Scholarship

At this point - I would consider starting a gofundme. The kind of money you need to raise is going to take time. Look into medtwitter and see if you can find folks who can help amplify your story/fundraising. There are a lot of folks willing and able to help.
 
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Wow thank you for such a detailed post and thorough explanation!! Your suggestion for setting up a deal with my lender might be difficult but worth a shot. I was planning on using loan companies like Sallie Mae. The school kinda shut me down immediately when I mentioned a private medical school loan, but maybe if I find an individual lender I might be able to do that since it would be a personal loan and not a medical school loan. And yes I’m very disappointed in this whole situation. After my interview and their presentation on the school’s history this was the last thing I expected. And thank you for your kind words it really means a lot. As for the CNN idea I’ll remember you if it comes down to that haha. Thank you once again
:) It's my pleasure. People like you and your parents have historically made the country great, and I HATE seeing you be treated this way.

Don't allow yourself to get confused -- Sallie Mae IS a private company, in spite of its name. It was a quasi governmental agency once upon a time, but it's totally private now, which is why they will lend to you. They are not going to be too different from any other private lender with respect to their policies. Don't bother even trying a personal loan. You won't have the credit profile to support a multi-hundred thousand dollar personal loan -- very few of us would. An education loan is the only way to go here.

Again, if the lender won't provide a 4-year commitment up front (which the school would still have to accept), or, be willing to fund all 4 years up front due to the unique circumstances (doubtful -- too much risk for them if you don't finish the program, even though NYMC DOES say they will refund unused money), and the school isn't willing to make an exception for DACA, then your choices really are limited to trying to publicly shame them into doing the right thing or just drop it, get your Green Card, and start over.
 
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At NYMC start with these two offices for support in trying to troubleshoot this. Emphasize how excited you are about their program and how you want to try to make it work.

Also reach out to medical student associations such as the one below. They likely can connect you with others who have had to navigate similar pathways.

Look for outside scholarships particularly those geared towards students from diverse background and DACA students. Example is this: The Hispanic Health Professional Student Scholarship

At this point - I would consider starting a gofundme. The kind of money you need to raise is going to take time. Look into medtwitter and see if you can find folks who can help amplify your story/fundraising. There are a lot of folks willing and able to help.
So I reached out to those two offices. The office of medical student affairs told me to keep reaching out to financial aid. Te office of diversity in a somewhat rude tone told me anything financial was dealt by the financial aid office and that they had my answers. I’m definitely going to check out that scholarship and reach out to them. Thank you!!

Edit: I reached out to the financial office and they told me they have no DACA students in the M.D. program. I would be the only one.
 
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So I reached out to those two offices. The office of medical student affairs told me to keep reaching out to financial aid. Te office of diversity in a somewhat rude tone told me anything financial was dealt by the financial aid office and that they had my answers. I’m definitely going to check out that scholarship and reach out to them. Thank you!!

Edit: I reached out to the financial office and they told me they have no DACA students in the M.D. program. I would be the only one.
Then that's your answer. Someone made a mistake when they accepted you without realizing you are DACA. Now, they are either going to fix that mistake or not, and you are either going to make a public scene or not. It doesn't seem like they have any interest in accommodating you, and you have no way to attend if they don't.

Again, once you have a Green Card you no longer need them, so I honestly wouldn't bother with a deferral, and that's assuming they are even receptive to granting you one. The way you are being treated by both diversity and fin aid tells us they are hostile to DACA. It is what it is, and, at least at NYMC, diversity only extends to citizens and permanent residents, not innocent people brought to the country illegally as children. Good to know for anyone who cares about modeling the traits med schools seem to cherish so much while screening applicants.
 
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Can you defer one year with the possibility of two years IF your green card is not approved in time? That might be an easier sell than asking for two years up front. Maybe say you will get an MPH or even start a PhD while you wait for your green card? This is an exceptional circumstance where you might be able to get grace from your school.

Also, what was your plan to pay for medical school before you applied? I am concerned that this situation is a surprise to you. Remember, you are allowed to stay in the US by a very thin, possibly unconstitutional, executive order. Getting a green card should have been your first priority before medical school, whether it was through marriage or family sponsorship. What if Trump had been re-elected? You could have been deported during medical school. What if you and your fiancé broke up? Can DACA recipients even get a visa for residency? Very questionable decision making going on here.

Also, go to the court house tomorrow and get married.
My plan was to pay through private loans. I had never heard before of medical school denying private loans. As far as I know most of DACA students are paying medical school in this manner. The other options being scholarships provided by the school due to the competitiveness of their application. Believe me if I could have gotten a green card earlier I certainly would have. My only option was to get it through marriage as I don't have any family that could sponsor me. I wanted to do things the right way, so I waited until I actually found a girl that would put up with me and do it for real haha. I knew that it was very unlikely that anything bad would happen with DACA as it has sympathy from both sides. Yes it was a risk, but so are many things in life. I applied to schools based on an MSAR report that filtered schools to show which ones would allow DACA students. NYMC was on that list, and as far as I know they are the only school that allows DACA student, but still has a policy like that. I am still waiting to hear back from one more school, but I am not going to sit around and wait for something to happen if I can be proactive about my current situation.
 
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Then that's your answer. Someone made a mistake when they accepted you without realizing you are DACA. Now, they are either going to fix that mistake or not, and you are either going to make a public scene or not. It doesn't like they have any interest in accommodating you, and you have no way to attend if they don't.

Again, once you have a Green Card you no longer need them, so I honestly wouldn't bother with a deferral, and that's assuming they were even receptive to granting you one. The way you are being treated by both diversity and fin aid tells us they are hostile to DACA. It is what it is, and, at least at NYMC, diversity only extends to citizens and permanent residents, not innocent people brought to the country illegally as children. Good to know for anyone who cares about modeling the traits med schools seem to cherish so much while screening applicants.
You're absolutely right, I am going to attempt speaking directly to the dean and explain my situation. I have nothing to lose at this point as it seems no one else at the school is able to help me out. Thank you KnightDoc, seeing the support you and others are giving me really makes me feel less alone about all this. The last few days were kind of rough, but I'm done grieving my situation, and now I have to do something about it.
 
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My program has several DACA students who applied without funding sources upfront. Fortunately things worked out for them and they were able to arrange funding.
 
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If any student would need to pay 4 years up front, it would be someone who doesn't even have a visa to be in the US legally, unlike other international students. It is probably not up to the school about certifying the loan anyways. Private student loans are still regulated by the federal government. Regardless of how you feel about DACA, OP is not a citizen, permanent resident, or here on a legal visa. I can't imagine applying to medical school as someone who is in a country illegally, and not having a very well verified path to pay for medical school.

Also, many international students can get loans from their home countries, not just from rich parents.
No. OP linked to NYMC policy regarding international students, which is how they are classifying DACA as non-citizens and non Green Card holders. The school can certify or not certify any loan it wants. OP is ineligible for federal loans due to immigration status.

Sallie Mae's requirement: "Borrowers must be U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents if the school is located outside of the United States. Non-U.S. citizen borrowers who reside in the U.S. are eligible with a creditworthy cosigner (who must be a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident) and are required to provide an unexpired government-issued photo ID to verify identity." Of course, OP won't be able to close on a loan if the school won't certify, and the school won't certify for "international students" because it wants all 4 years upfront, or 2 years with a promise to make additional annual prepayments before the second and third years, with a guarantee of payment made by a creditworthy US citizen.

For the record, OP has DACA status, and is not here "illegally" under US law. Of course, if OP was illegal, merely applying would risk deportation, which is certainly not the case here. No one is saying a DACA is "entitled" to anything. It's just that an ethical institution that welcomes applications from non-citizens would make reasonable accommodations (like certifying a loan application) to allow a DACA candidate to attend.

Again, for the record, the US IS OP's "home country" if it is where they grew up, notwithstanding the fact that their parents came here illegally a generation ago. That is why there is no widespread consensus to deport them, even among immigration hardliners who don't want to reward how they came here with a path to citizenship. Do you know a single "home country" that originates 4 year loans for students to make prepayments to attend school in the US, other than maybe places like China that require the students to come home and work for the state post-graduation? That would do nothing for a DACA whose parents came to the US illegally 10, 15, or 20 years ago.
 
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Does anyone know if DACA recipients are allowed to join the military? Seems the military is very concerned about social engineering right now. A military scholarship could be the solution.. Just a thought.
No we’re not. I have tried joining the marines, and army in the past. At one point i had hope through the MAVNI program which would allow me to enlist with an essential language or a medical degree requirement. So I started learning Portuguese. Sadly the program shut down shortly after I started learning the language. You can qualify for the DACA program through military service but that’s for individuals that were able to somehow slip through the cracks and serve illegally.
 
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KnightDoc

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Does anyone know if DACA recipients are allowed to join the military? Seems the military is very concerned about social engineering right now. A military scholarship could be the solution.. Just a thought.
"Since all military physicians serve as commissioned officers, you must be a U.S. citizen in order to apply."
 
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Hope it works out for you OP. It would be idiotic for NYMC not to accommodate you.

You could easily bring light to this issue publicly and 1) you might get help from other sources and 2) NYMC would get a bad reputation. But before you do this, kick this can up the chain of command (i.e. deans) and see if that works.

Kind of a silly policy IMO - if private lenders approve money for OP, then what does it matter to NYMC. OP isn't an "international student." Or NYMC has just been ignorant this whole time regarding DACA? Which also isn't a great look...
 

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Good Luck OP and pardon my ignorance. So you were able to get a private loan without any collateral? Why does the school need to certify the loan, does it put some risk on their plate? If a private bank was willing to take a risk on you and give you an uncollateralized loan, why does the school care if they are getting payments?

But doesn't getting a loan come down to just the economics and risks of approving the loan? The only reason every College/med student can take out a huge uncollateralized loan is the government artificially backs them and thus essentially takes the risks off the private sector's plate. This is creating the big student loan issues we have now.

Being DACA, do you even have a SSN? If the government is not backing/guaranteeing the loan, why would the private sector approve a loan given the high risks of non payment? Every private bank would be bankrupt if student loans were not backed by the government.

Economically, every DACA student unless you have rich family members/collateralized assets, these loans make no sense to make.

The banks do not really care, they just want to make money and your risk is very high risks.
 
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Good Luck OP and pardon my ignorance. So you were able to get a private loan without any collateral? Why does the school need to certify the loan, does it put some risk on their plate? If a private bank was willing to take a risk on you and give you an uncollateralized loan, why does the school care if they are getting payments?

But doesn't getting a loan come down to just the economics and risks of approving the loan? The only reason every College/med student can take out a huge uncollateralized loan is the government artificially backs them and thus essentially takes the risks off the private sector's plate. This is creating the big student loan issues we have now.

Being DACA, do you even have a SSN? If the government is not backing/guaranteeing the loan, why would the private sector approve a loan given the high risks of non payment? Every private bank would be bankrupt if student loans were not backed by the government.

Economically, every DACA student unless you have rich family members/collateralized assets, these loans make no sense to make.

The banks do not really care, they just want to make money and your risk is very high risks.
Since OP is DACA, they are authorized to work (granted an Employment Authorization Document) and are given an SSN. Tbh, this school's policy dosen't make sense to me either, but I guess its got something to do with a risk factor.
 

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Good Luck OP and pardon my ignorance. So you were able to get a private loan without any collateral? Why does the school need to certify the loan, does it put some risk on their plate? If a private bank was willing to take a risk on you and give you an uncollateralized loan, why does the school care if they are getting payments?

But doesn't getting a loan come down to just the economics and risks of approving the loan? The only reason every College/med student can take out a huge uncollateralized loan is the government artificially backs them and thus essentially takes the risks off the private sector's plate. This is creating the big student loan issues we have now.

Being DACA, do you even have a SSN? If the government is not backing/guaranteeing the loan, why would the private sector approve a loan given the high risks of non payment? Every private bank would be bankrupt if student loans were not backed by the government.

Economically, every DACA student unless you have rich family members/collateralized assets, these loans make no sense to make.

The banks do not really care, they just want to make money and your risk is very high risks.
My guess is that some banks have analyzed the risk and view DACA med students as being a pretty safe bet. I just spent some time looking at the terms for some loans for international and DACA students and the interest rates/conditions are pretty onerous - 8%+ interest and fixed loan repayment, 5%+ origination fee.
 

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My guess is that some banks have analyzed the risk and view DACA med students as being a pretty safe bet. I just spent some time looking at the terms for some loans for international and DACA students and the interest rates/conditions are pretty onerous - 8%+ interest and fixed loan repayment, 5%+ origination fee.
8% interests for an uncollateralized loan is with a 5% origination is very generous. Very Generous and easy to game the loan. Some private schools costs 100K to attend a year x 4 yrs would put the loan around 600K+ by the time they finish residency.

What would stop the student from declaring bankruptcy?
 

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8% interests for an uncollateralized loan is with a 5% origination is very generous. Very Generous and easy to game the loan. Some private schools costs 100K to attend a year x 4 yrs would put the loan around 600K+ by the time they finish residency.

What would stop the student from declaring bankruptcy?
Pretty difficult to discharge student loans through bankruptcy given the standard used in courts focusing on ones total financial picture. On a physicians salary it would be hard to argue undue hardship.

400k loans upfront with 5% origination fee and 8% interest rate would be close to 800k by the end of residency (assuming a 4 year residency).
 
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Good Luck OP and pardon my ignorance. So you were able to get a private loan without any collateral? Why does the school need to certify the loan, does it put some risk on their plate? If a private bank was willing to take a risk on you and give you an uncollateralized loan, why does the school care if they are getting payments?

But doesn't getting a loan come down to just the economics and risks of approving the loan? The only reason every College/med student can take out a huge uncollateralized loan is the government artificially backs them and thus essentially takes the risks off the private sector's plate. This is creating the big student loan issues we have now.

Being DACA, do you even have a SSN? If the government is not backing/guaranteeing the loan, why would the private sector approve a loan given the high risks of non payment? Every private bank would be bankrupt if student loans were not backed by the government.

Economically, every DACA student unless you have rich family members/collateralized assets, these loans make no sense to make.

The banks do not really care, they just want to make money and your risk is very high risks.
Yes, you are overthinking it. Sallie Mae is willing to lend to OP, just like they would lend to us. It's a private STUDENT loan, not a plain vanilla uncollateralized loan. The school needs to certify the loan because schools always need to certify student loans. This is what stops people from scamming banks by taking student loans while they are not students!

The school cares because they are being dicks about it. They are not distinguishing between DACA and other foreign students, and they want at least half their money up front, with a credit worthy US citizen personally guaranteeing the balance. Probably because foreigners without an ability to pay have been problems for the school in the past, so they cater to wealthy foreigners who don't need loans.

DACA doesn't exactly fit that profile, but NYMC did not connect the dots, and admitted OP without disclosing that they would neither certify private student loans nor make any reasonable accommodation to actually enable OP to enroll. The Sallie Mae loan OP would take is basically the same everyone else gets, without the generous income based repayment or loan forgiveness provisions of a federal loan. These loans are not predatory in any way, and are a perfectly reasonable way to fund a med school education. PLENTY of people eligible for federal loans use similar loans, due to lower up front costs, if they don't think they are going to need to benefits built into a federal loan.

Just Google private student loans. A TON of them are out there, and none of them are backed by the government. Loans to US med students are among the safest out there. Very low default rates. Virtually everyone who begins a US medical program finishes it, whether citizen, DACA, Green Card, etc., and doctors tend to make very stable, relatively high incomes. Exactly the profile banks want to lend to and build long term relationships with for future business (mortgages, savings accounts, investment products, business loans, etc., etc., etc.).

Foreign non-citizens ARE a repayment risk, because they could go back home after graduation and be judgment proof, but it's hard to imagine a DACA leaving after graduation to skip out on a debt. Sure, there's a theoretical risk of future deportation, but, if the bank is willing to take it, it's nobody else's problem. Not the school's and not the taxpayers'.
 
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Hey guys just wanted to say I appreciate the support and advice you have all given me. It really does mean a lot. I’ve gotten in touch with someone in an administration position and will hopefully be speaking with a dean very soon. I’m committed to fulfilling my dream of becoming a physician, so I’m not going to give up that easily. If for some reason things don’t work out this year, then I’ll be reapplying next cycle.
 
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Hey guys just wanted to say I appreciate the support and advice you have all given me. It really does mean a lot. I’ve gotten in touch with someone in an administration position and will hopefully be speaking with a dean very soon. I’m committed to fulfilling my dream of becoming a physician, so I’m not going to give up that easily. If for some reason things don’t work out this year, then I’ll be reapplying next cycle.
I feel like I am personally invested in your success now! :) My sincere advice would be to NOT reapply until you obtain your Green Card. That will open many more doors for you by allowing you to apply everywhere. Plus, the added experience will make your application a lot better than it is now.

A stronger application, the ability to apply everywhere, and this episode as your overcoming adversity story will make you a very compelling applicant. Spend the extra year or two rather than settling for whatever you might get next cycle while still a DACA. With any luck, even without a Green Card, you might have an actual path to citizenship by then. JMHO.
 
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Hey guys just wanted to say I appreciate the support and advice you have all given me. It really does mean a lot. I’ve gotten in touch with someone in an administration position and will hopefully be speaking with a dean very soon. I’m committed to fulfilling my dream of becoming a physician, so I’m not going to give up that easily. If for some reason things don’t work out this year, then I’ll be reapplying next cycle.
I hope this all works out for you, OP! It's really a shame how NYMC is handling this but I wanna say that if it doesn't pan out this cycle, I would definitely recommend getting your green card first before applying. Even if that means skipping next cycle while you wait for the green card to be processed. You could use this time to build an even stronger application too. I know that schools usually view it as a red flag when students get accepted to a med school and forego that acceptance bc it casts doubt on whether they would actually attend if accepted a second time. But I think in your case its different because you can explain your circumstance and it is a pretty compelling reason that is out of your control. Best of luck to you!
 
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Actually, DACA is a legal status, just like someone who is here on a visa.
Hopefully the moderators allow a reply, because you are spreading misinformation, which makes it harder to understand the unique and unfair situation OP and other DACA recipients have been put in. I am not trying to debate whether the current system is fair (if anyone is curious, I think DACA recipients would have a clear pathway to a green card...it isn't their fault they were brought to the US as kids). I am just clarifying what the current system is.

The following is from the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website. USCIS is a department of DHS which is relevant for the Supreme Court case discussed below.
However, deferred action does not confer lawful status upon an individual, nor does it excuse any previous or subsequent periods of unlawful presence.
They even are the ones who placed "lawful status" in bold.

Here is another quote to highlight the uniqueness of DACA

However, although deferred action does not confer a lawful immigration status, your period of stay is authorized by the Department of Homeland Security while your deferred action is in effect...
So OP does NOT have a lawful immigration status (which has been my point the entire time), but they are authorized by the DHS to stay while their case is "deferred." Quite the messy situation.

Another quote from the same website clarifying that the federal government is choosing to not deport DACA people, but DACA people are NOT in the US lawfully like people on a visa, which you claim to be the same...it isn't. For this quote the bold is my own:
DHS will exercise prosecutorial discretion as appropriate to ensure that enforcement resources are not expended on low priority cases, such as individuals who came to the United States as children and meet other key guidelines.
Again, I don't think this is really a debate about immigration law. This is just a clarification of what is happening in OP's case.

Also, the 2020 Supreme Court case was to do with something called the Administrative Procedure Act which is basically the law that governs how the executive branch can implement and change regulations. This case was consolidated with two other cases also challenging Trump's repeal of DACA.

Here is the relevant part from Chief Justice Roberts' majority opinion:

Whether DACA is illegal is, of course, a legal determination, and therefore a question for the Attorney General. But deciding how best to address a finding of illegality moving forward can involve important policy choices, especially when the finding concerns a program with the breadth of DACA. Those policy choices are for DHS.
So no, the Supreme Court did not decide in 2020 that DACA was legal, the court only said the Trump administration did not follow the proper procedure when trying to end DACA. The court kicked the "legal or illegal" decision to the DHS and see the above quote from the DHS saying DACA recipients are NOT granted lawful status.

I think my comment stays well within what is relevant to the post, and doesn't delve into the politics of US immigration policy. I just want to make the facts clear as they apply to OP. If @gyngyn or another moderator disagrees, I will delete this comment and leave this thread alone. My entire point of ever mentioning that OP is not in the US under lawful status is that it is not as simple as getting NYMC to grant OP an exception for their loans. This decision could be way above some Dean of Financial Aid's head.
 
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Hopefully the moderators allow a reply, because you are spreading misinformation, which makes it harder to understand the unique and unfair situation OP and other DACA recipients have been put in. I am not trying to debate whether the current system is fair (if anyone is curious, I think DACA recipients would have a clear pathway to a green card...it isn't their fault they were brought to the US as kids). I am just clarifying what the current system is.

The following is from the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website. USCIS is a department of DHS which is relevant for the Supreme Court case discussed below.

They even are the ones who placed "lawful status" in bold.

Here is another quote to highlight the uniqueness of DACA


So OP does NOT have a lawful immigration status (which has been my point the entire time), but they are authorized by the DHS to stay while their case is "deferred." Quite the messy situation.

Another quote from the same website clarifying that the federal government is choosing to not deport DACA people, but DACA people are NOT in the US lawfully like people on a visa, which you claim to be the same...it isn't. For this quote the bold is my own:

Again, I don't think this is really a debate about immigration law. This is just a clarification of what is happening in OP's case.

Also, the 2020 Supreme Court case was to do with something called the Administrative Procedure Act which is basically the law that governs how the executive branch can implement and change regulations. This case was consolidated with two other cases also challenging Trump's repeal of DACA.

Here is the relevant part from Chief Justice Roberts' majority opinion:


So no, the Supreme Court did not decide in 2020 that DACA was legal, the court only said the Trump administration did not follow the proper procedure when trying to end DACA. The court kicked the "legal or illegal" decision to the DHS and see the above quote from the DHS saying DACA recipients are NOT granted lawful status.

I think my comment stays well within what is relevant to the post, and doesn't delve into the politics of US immigration policy. I just want to make the facts clear as they apply to OP. If @gyngyn or another moderator disagrees, I will delete this comment and leave this thread alone. My entire point of ever mentioning that OP is not in the US under lawful status is that it is not as simple as getting NYMC to grant OP an exception for their loans. This decision could be way above some Dean of Financial Aid's head.
This is a really thoughtful and well laid out reply.

In terms of the financial aid question, while it is currently NYMV policy not to grant scholarships or grants to DACA students, that policy can be changed. For the purposes of this thread I am much more interested in the crux of a question which is how can OP pay for school without federal loans. In this case the schools policy is a bit onerous. From what I remember on Twitter and go fund me last summer there were several students who were awarded scholarships after outside pressure was applied on their medical school to help them pay what is to pay tuition and room and board. There are plenty of programs that advertise their diverse initiatives in order to boost their public perception and generate positive headlines. At some point one has to ask these programs do you simply talk the talk or are you going to walk the walk? And I think this is a really clear scenario of that. My hope is that nymc will work with the OP to find a solution but I don’t think they are going to do so of their own volition.
 
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This is a really thoughtful and well laid out reply.

In terms of the financial aid question, while it is currently NYMV policy not to grant scholarships or grants to DACA students, that policy can be changed. For the purposes of this thread I am much more interested in the crux of a question which is how can OP pay for school without federal loans. In this case the schools policy is a bit onerous. From what I remember on Twitter and go fund me last summer there were several students who were awarded scholarships after outside pressure was applied on their medical school to help them pay what is to pay tuition and room and board. There are plenty of programs that advertise their diverse initiatives in order to boost their public perception and generate positive headlines. At some point one has to ask these programs do you simply talk the talk or are you going to walk the walk? And I think this is a really clear scenario of that. My hope is that nymc will work with the OP to find a solution but I don’t think they are going to do so of their own volition.
And, this case is even more egregious, because OP has actually lined up private loans, but NYMC won't certify them because they won't deviate from a strict policy defining DACA as foreign students from whom it wants cash up front, no loans!! That's the crazy thing here - OP isn't even asking for a handout from either taxpayers or the school!!!!!
 
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I feel like I am personally invested in your success now! :) My sincere advice would be to NOT reapply until you obtain your Green Card. That will open many more doors for you by allowing you to apply everywhere. Plus, the added experience will make your application a lot better than it is now.

A stronger application, the ability to apply everywhere, and this episode as your overcoming adversity story will make you a very compelling applicant. Spend the extra year or two rather than settling for whatever you might get next cycle while still a DACA. With any luck, even without a Green Card, you might have an actual path to citizenship by then. JMHO.

I hope this all works out for you, OP! It's really a shame how NYMC is handling this but I wanna say that if it doesn't pan out this cycle, I would definitely recommend getting your green card first before applying. Even if that means skipping next cycle while you wait for the green card to be processed. You could use this time to build an even stronger application too. I know that schools usually view it as a red flag when students get accepted to a med school and forego that acceptance bc it casts doubt on whether they would actually attend if accepted a second time. But I think in your case its different because you can explain your circumstance and it is a pretty compelling reason that is out of your control. Best of luck to you!

This is another one of my concerns. I would certainly wait another year, but that would mean I would have to apply next cycle completely out of pocket (I applied this cycle using the FAP). I am currently working two jobs and not making much in the name of continuing my clinical experience. Is there such a thing as "enough" clinical experience? I have been doing clinical work for about six years now, so would it be ok if I took another job that maybe paid some more but didn't add any hours to my clinical experience? I am in contract with my main job until the beginning of July. This way I could afford to pay for the next cycle in case I skip this upcoming one. I also am worried about what you mentioned @and 99 others, in regards to me foregoing the acceptance. And thanks again for the encouragement. You all have certainly made me feel much better about this whole situation.
 

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This is another one of my concerns. I would certainly wait another year, but that would mean I would have to apply next cycle completely out of pocket (I applied this cycle using the FAP). I am currently working two jobs and not making much in the name of continuing my clinical experience. Is there such a thing as "enough" clinical experience? I have been doing clinical work for about six years now, so would it be ok if I took another job that maybe paid some more but didn't add any hours to my clinical experience? I am in contract with my main job until the beginning of July. This way I could afford to pay for the next cycle in case I skip this upcoming one. I also am worried about what you mentioned @and 99 others, in regards to me foregoing the acceptance. And thanks again for the encouragement. You all have certainly made me feel much better about this whole situation.
Would your plan for another cycle to be a permanent resident through marriage by then so you don’t have these loan troubles?

6 years of clinical experience is plenty. Especially considering your difficulties this cycle, I don’t think any school worth attending will frown on you getting a better paying job so you can afford to apply again.
 
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You are also in the very rare situation where I think being an accepted reapplication wouldn’t nuke your application. If you explain what happened with NYMC, all that really shows about your character is that the system is unfair and you are continuing to persevere to become a doctor. It’s not like you turned down the acceptance because it wasn’t a top 20 school and you are too arrogant to attend anywhere but Harvard. Also, if they know what happened at NYMC, they hopefully wouldn’t tease you with an acceptance themselves if they can’t certify your loans.
 
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This is another one of my concerns. I would certainly wait another year, but that would mean I would have to apply next cycle completely out of pocket (I applied this cycle using the FAP). I am currently working two jobs and not making much in the name of continuing my clinical experience. Is there such a thing as "enough" clinical experience? I have been doing clinical work for about six years now, so would it be ok if I took another job that maybe paid some more but didn't add any hours to my clinical experience? I am in contract with my main job until the beginning of July. This way I could afford to pay for the next cycle in case I skip this upcoming one. I also am worried about what you mentioned @and 99 others, in regards to me foregoing the acceptance. And thanks again for the encouragement. You all have certainly made me feel much better about this whole situation.
First of all, if the school won't make it possible for you to be able to pay, you have no choice but to forgo the acceptance, and EVERY school in the future will understand the unique circumstances and not hold it against you.

Why do you think you'd have to pay out of pocket in the future? "You may be awarded fee assistance a maximum of five (5) times during your lifetime. This restriction enables other examinees and applicants to also benefit from this program. You will receive MCAT Official Prep product benefits once in a lifetime, regardless of the number of times you are a Fee Assistance Program awardee."

Yes, there absolutely is such a thing as "enough" clinical experience. Once you have a base level amount, absolutely take care of yourself and go make some money. Most schools are run by human beings (with NYMC being a possible exception), and no one is going to begrudge you taking care of yourself once you have enough experience to show you know what you are getting into.

What is the status of meeting with higher ups at NYMC? That is really the missing piece here. Also, are you talking about just applying next cycle to DACA friendly schools (in which case you need to get moving NOW to get your FAP approved!), or waiting until you get a Green Card, in which case, what are you doing to move that process along?
 
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St George's Medical School in the Caribbean on the island of Grenada takes in many foreign students. They get loans. Check with their student loan people how to apply. All the Caribbean schools offer loans to their students. There must be a way. Get someone on the phone and pump them for infor.
 
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This is another one of my concerns. I would certainly wait another year, but that would mean I would have to apply next cycle completely out of pocket (I applied this cycle using the FAP). I am currently working two jobs and not making much in the name of continuing my clinical experience. Is there such a thing as "enough" clinical experience? I have been doing clinical work for about six years now, so would it be ok if I took another job that maybe paid some more but didn't add any hours to my clinical experience? I am in contract with my main job until the beginning of July. This way I could afford to pay for the next cycle in case I skip this upcoming one. I also am worried about what you mentioned @and 99 others, in regards to me foregoing the acceptance. And thanks again for the encouragement. You all have certainly made me feel much better about this whole situation.
I don't see why you would be ineligible for FAP next year, unless you suddenly start making way more than you do now. In which case, your finance problem is also potentially alleviated. Regardless of whether you are eligible for FAP or not, I don't think it would be an issue if you didn't continue with your clinical work given that you've already got 6 years, which is A LOT. I don't know your situation, but I'd still imagine it would be possible to allocate 2 to 4 hours a week to volunteer somewhere meaningful. This would accumulate to quite a lot over 2 years (assuming you took a year off to ensure you get your green card). Again, if this is not possible, it's still not a big deal. Plus, the job itself, even if not clinical, is something you could add to your app that, at the very least, wouldn't reflect negatively.

re: foregoing the acceptance, as others have mentioned, I highly doubt it would be an issue in your case. I could even see it as a testament to your dedication and resilience, as @YCAGA mentioned. I'll defer to someone with admissions experience to give you a more reliable answer, but thinking about it logically, it seems a very valid reason.

Hope this helps and if you wanna DM me with more specific questions, feel free. I wasn't DACA but an international student so I have some experience with how fickle and unaccommodating schools can be with non-citizens/residents.
 

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Actually, I think NYMC is the bad guy here. Regardless of anyone's political views on DACA, it is a fact of life, and millions of people are here, working, paying taxes, etc. If NYMC was not receptive to DACA, as many schools aren't, they should have said so on the front end and not accepted the application and the secondary fee.

But, that is not the case here, because NYMC does accept foreign students. Someone in admissions failing to put 2+2 together and realize that a DACA is not in the same position as a child of a wealthy family from abroad is totally on the school. Refusing to certify a PRIVATE loan to make it possible for OP to attend is totally on the school. Requiring all four years upfront, from a DACA resident, is totally on the school.

Could OP really be deported at any time? Probably not. Trump and the Republicans had 4 years, and they didn't do it. Whether they ever get a path to legal citizenship or not, they are very likely never going anywhere. Can a DACA end up leaving them with an empty seat? Of course, but so could anyone else. Is a DACA more likely to? I don't know, but that should be the school's problem after issuing an acceptance.

We'll have to agree to disagree here, because, in my eyes, the school absolutely is the bad guy here. Until the situation arose, how the hell is OP supposed to know that the school won't certify a private loan for a DACA, because a DACA is neither a citizen nor a Green Card holder? That's why federal loans are unavailable, but, if Sallie Mae will lend, what good reason does NYMC have demanding all its money up front from a resident, with DACA status (not someone living in the shadows), with an approved loan?
If any student would need to pay 4 years up front, it would be someone who doesn't even have a visa to be in the US legally, unlike other international students. It is probably not up to the school about certifying the loan anyways. Private student loans are still regulated by the federal government. Regardless of how you feel about DACA, OP is not a citizen, permanent resident, or here on a legal visa. I can't imagine applying to medical school as someone who is in a country illegally, and not having a very well verified path to pay for medical school.

Also, many international students can get loans from their home countries, not just from rich parents.
 
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YCAGA

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Can you defer one year with the possibility of two years IF your green card is not approved in time? That might be an easier sell than asking for two years up front. Maybe say you will get an MPH or even start a PhD while you wait for your green card? This is an exceptional circumstance where you might be able to get grace from your school.

Also, what was your plan to pay for medical school before you applied? I am concerned that this situation is a surprise to you. Remember, you are allowed to stay in the US by a very thin, possibly unconstitutional, executive order. Getting a green card should have been your first priority before medical school, whether it was through marriage or family sponsorship. What if Trump had been re-elected? You could have been deported during medical school. What if you and your fiancé broke up? Can DACA recipients even get a visa for residency? Very questionable decision making going on here.

Also, go to the court house tomorrow and get married.
 

YCAGA

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Then that's your answer. Someone made a mistake when they accepted you without realizing you are DACA. Now, they are either going to fix that mistake or not, and you are either going to make a public scene or not. It doesn't like they have any interest in accommodating you, and you have no way to attend if they don't.

Again, once you have a Green Card you no longer need them, so I honestly wouldn't bother with a deferral, and that's assuming they were even receptive to granting you one. The way you are being treated by both diversity and fin aid tells us they are hostile to DACA. It is what it is, and, at least at NYMC, diversity only extends to citizens and permanent residents, not innocent people brought to the country illegally as children. Good to know for anyone who cares about modeling the traits med schools seem to cherish so much while screening applicants.
NYMC is not the bad guy here. OP is not in this country legally, what is a medical school supposed to do about that? DACA is just kicking the can down the road and delaying deportation for people brought here illegally as kids; delaying deportation does not mean they are here legally. Federal law will have to change to make them legal residents, not NYMC policy.
 
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