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Chance of IM residency in the US?

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usmledkp

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Hi all, new to the forum!

I would like to begin by asking if there is any chance of being able to match into an Internal Medicine residency program as an IMG, given my record:-

I'm a UK medical student (top 5/10 medical school) and I've just finished my third year (two years of pre-clinical sciences + intercalated (sandwich) BSc year).

In my first year I failed one of my single best answer papers (1 of 3 papers) and in my second year I failed the newly introduced OSCE component but passed the single best answer paper. This meant in both years I had to resit all exams in the same summer (the entire set of exams must be resit together even if previously passed). Therefore, I failed both pre-clinical years but did not repeat any years. This last year I achieved a 2:1 in my Cardiovascular BSc (the second highest degree classification in the UK - a good average achieved by most of my medical school friends), I also averaged a First this year across my exams but the marks in the previous two years brought down my overall grade to a 2:1.

Now that my academic transcript is tainted (which I will receive soon with my BSc certificate and will find out exactly how many 'F's/attempts' it states), do I have any chance of gaining a place in the US as an IMG if I were to work extremely hard and do much better in the remaining 3 clinical years of my program and do extremely well in USMLE + LORs, electives, publications etc.

I would be open to any internal medicine residency in pretty much all states.

I know working extremely harder is easier said than done but I would be willing to make the necessary sacrifices if I were to know that there is still some realistic chance of gaining a place, or whether it's not even worth trying to apply and sit the USMLEs.

Any help at all is kindly appreciated
 

Medstart108

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Hi all, new to the forum!

I would like to begin by asking if there is any chance of being able to match into an Internal Medicine residency program as an IMG, given my record:-

I'm a UK medical student (top 5/10 medical school) and I've just finished my third year (two years of pre-clinical sciences + intercalated (sandwich) BSc year).

In my first year I failed one of my single best answer papers (1 of 3 papers) and in my second year I failed the newly introduced OSCE component but passed the single best answer paper. This meant in both years I had to resit all exams in the same summer (the entire set of exams must be resit together even if previously passed). Therefore, I failed both pre-clinical years but did not repeat any years. This last year I achieved a 2:1 in my Cardiovascular BSc (the second highest degree classification in the UK - a good average achieved by most of my medical school friends), I also averaged a First this year across my exams but the marks in the previous two years brought down my overall grade to a 2:1.

Now that my academic transcript is tainted (which I will receive soon with my BSc certificate and will find out exactly how many 'F's/attempts' it states), do I have any chance of gaining a place in the US as an IMG if I were to work extremely hard and do much better in the remaining 3 clinical years of my program and do extremely well in USMLE + LORs, electives, publications etc.

I would be open to any internal medicine residency in pretty much all states.

I know working extremely harder is easier said than done but I would be willing to make the necessary sacrifices if I were to know that there is still some realistic chance of gaining a place, or whether it's not even worth trying to apply and sit the USMLEs.

Any help at all is kindly appreciated

You should definitely still have a chance. The US doesn't care about your transcript, they look at your USMLEs and your US clinical experience first and foremost.
 
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