itsthat1guy

Not that other guy
Oct 25, 2012
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Hi guys, I'm applying next cycle and wanted an idea of where I stand. A little background; graduated last May with BS in Molecular Biology and minor in Chemistry, CT resident (although I'm not sure if that changes after living elsewhere for 2 years) currently in my first of 2 years at the NIH. Since I'm applying next year I've made a few assumptions about what my app will look like at that time, but I think they're all reasonable.

MCAT
9/2013: 10PS/9VR/10BS Total: 29
8/2014: 12/10/12 Total: 34

GPA
3.65 cumulative/science with a very strong upward trend; average cumulative/science is a 3.85 for junior, senior and postbac courses.

Research
Summer of clinical research at a hospital, no pub or posters (full time for 3 months)

One year in chem lab my senior year, ~15 hours a week. Currently have a paper being reviewed in a meh journal with low authorship.

As I mentioned I've been at the NIH for about 3 months. By the time I apply I think I'l probably have a 2nd author pub, based on how far along the project is now (mice are almost bred tohomozygosity so we will begin doing experiments in earnest in a couple months). Also have another project that I'll be first author on but only just got F1 pups this week so no publications will come until after I apply most likely.

Clinical Volunteering
Worked in hospital for 3 semesters, about 150 hours total. Interviewed patients for various studies.

This is a big weakness in my app, I'm hoping to get another 100 hours or so before applying, have applyied to several hospitals in the area, no luck as of yet but I'll keep looking.

Shadowing
About 80 hours across various specialties.

Other Volunteering
Tutored Middle schoolers for 2 semesters, about 80 hours total. Was the shift leader for one semester, so a little leadership experience here.

Was the "ambassador" for my major's department for 3 ssmesters; basically talked to incoming freshman about the department and what the major entailed.

Will be tutoring/mentoring youths in a poor area of DC starting soon; hoping to get about 80 hours out of this before applying.

Awards
One from French dept. and another from the college of liberal arts and sciences.

Cursory School List
I like to think that with my strong upward trend I can consider schools with an average GPA closer to 3.8.

Einstein
Case
Mayo
U Colorado
U Conn
UNC Chapel Hill
U Rochester
U Washington
George Washington
Georgetown (without divulging too much, I have a connection here that could help with getting an interview)
Rutgers
Stony Brook
SUNY Upstate
SUNY Downstate
U Illinois
U Maryland
U Mich

Any suggestions for schools to add or remove are greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance
 
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GrapesofRath

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You will probably have much more success with lower tier and perhaps some medium tier MD programs than the MD/PhD kind of programs.

The average MD/PhD matriculant has a 3.8/35. You don't have that; your GPA is a 3.65 not a 3.8. You needed two MCAT attempts just to get a score within the MD/PhD ball park(and yes the first attempt matters). Depending on how well your research goes this next year(just assuming you'll get 2nd author pubs is not very wise) and how strong your PI rec letter is you might have a shot at being a viable candidate at a lower tier MD/PhD programs(your odds will clearly be best at UCONN). But that should not be your focus; your focus should be more on lower tier and some medium tier MD only programs where you definitely are a viable candidate.
 
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itsthat1guy

itsthat1guy

Not that other guy
Oct 25, 2012
477
321
Status
Pre-Medical
You will probably have much more success with lower tier and perhaps some medium tier MD programs than the MD/PhD kind of programs.

The average MD/PhD matriculant has a 3.8/35. You don't have that; your GPA is a 3.65 not a 3.8. You needed two MCAT attempts just to get a score within the MD/PhD ball park(and yes the first attempt matters). Depending on how well your research goes this next year(just assuming you'll get 2nd author pubs is not very wise) and how strong your PI rec letter is you might have a shot at being a viable candidate at a lower tier MD/PhD programs(your odds will clearly be best at UCONN). But that should not be your focus; your focus should be more on lower tier and some medium tier MD only programs where you definitely are a viable candidate.
Thanks for your frankness
 
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I was looking at Hofstra closely yesterday. Website states very explicitly that they use "highest composite" MCAT score.....whatever one may make of that.
 

Goro

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Concur.


You will probably have much more success with lower tier and perhaps some medium tier MD programs than the MD/PhD kind of programs.

The average MD/PhD matriculant has a 3.8/35. You don't have that; your GPA is a 3.65 not a 3.8. You needed two MCAT attempts just to get a score within the MD/PhD ball park(and yes the first attempt matters). Depending on how well your research goes this next year(just assuming you'll get 2nd author pubs is not very wise) and how strong your PI rec letter is you might have a shot at being a viable candidate at a lower tier MD/PhD programs(your odds will clearly be best at UCONN). But that should not be your focus; your focus should be more on lower tier and some medium tier MD only programs where you definitely are a viable candidate.
 

Banco

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May 28, 2014
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Your chances for MD only are good. Your chances for MD/PhD are best at schools that will focus on your 34 and not average the scores. It is important to get extensive research experience; publications can help.

One thing I am noticing with your list is that you have a lot of public schools where you are OOS. It is best to remove some of those and replace them with private schools, because a lot of these public schools have significant bias against those who aren't from their respective states - especially Rutgers, Washington, UNC.

I think your focus should be on MD only however; but I wouldn't feel right totally discouraging you from MD/PhD if that is your dream - your state school is probably your best bet here. But remember you can do a lot of research as an MD alone, but you probably won't be running your own lab or anything.

You should also post in the MD/PhD forum to get some more expert opinions.
 
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itsthat1guy

itsthat1guy

Not that other guy
Oct 25, 2012
477
321
Status
Pre-Medical
Your chances for MD only are good. Your chances for MD/PhD are best at schools that will focus on your 34 and not average the scores. It is important to get extensive research experience; publications can help.

One thing I am noticing with your list is that you have a lot of public schools where you are OOS. It is best to remove some of those and replace them with private schools, because a lot of these public schools have significant bias against those who aren't from their respective states - especially Rutgers, Washington, UNC.

I think your focus should be on MD only however; but I wouldn't feel right totally discouraging you from MD/PhD if that is your dream - your state school is probably your best bet here. But remember you can do a lot of research as an MD alone, but you probably won't be running your own lab or anything.

You should also post in the MD/PhD forum to get some more expert opinions.
I was under the impression that state schools don't take residency into account when considering people for MSTP admission
 

gyngyn

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I was under the impression that state schools don't take residency into account when considering people for MSTP admission
Many of them don't have MSTP's.
They are entirely funded by the school (read state taxpayers and other tuition dollars). Even positions with federal support only cover a modest portion of what it costs to train one.
If you can check the state of residency for MD/PhD's (especially in the smaller states), I'll wager a preference for IS (even if not declared as a preference).
 
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itsthat1guy

itsthat1guy

Not that other guy
Oct 25, 2012
477
321
Status
Pre-Medical
Many of them don't have MSTP's.
They are entirely funded by the school (read state taxpayers and other tuition dollars). Even positions with federal support only cover a modest portion of what it costs to train one.
If you can check the state of residency for MD/PhD's (especially in the smaller states), I'll wager a preference for IS (even if not declared as a preference).
Thanks for clarifying
 
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