gyngyn

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The secondaries that ask about charges (including juvenile) will give you a space to explain what happened.
 
OP
H
Aug 22, 2015
14
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Status
Pre-Medical
The secondaries that ask about charges (including juvenile) will give you a space to explain what happened.
Yes, I've been staring at them. Scary to think that all the hard work might be overlooked by a mistake that happened 11 years ago.

The way I have decided to answer it is to be as broad as possible with what happened so it doesn't sound like I'm making an excuse about the situation, "After an argument I ended up being charged with **this and these are the things I've learned and what my punishment was. Etc." as opposed to being detailed and making excuses about the situation and how I wasn't the instigator and what not.

Is this the proper way to go about it? Seems more mature than complaining about something that happened 11 years ago.

Do people with my circumstances ever get accepted?
 
OP
H
Aug 22, 2015
14
0
Status
Pre-Medical
It depends on the offense, what you learned and what has happened since
Thanks.

Do I keep it broad and just discuss what I have learned and how I have not been in trouble since? Or do I go into details and describe the issues?

The people in the juvenile system I spoke to said none of this is online and no one would be able to see it, but I figured I should disclose it anyways, correct?
 

gyngyn

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Thanks.

Do I keep it broad and just discuss what I have learned and how I have not been in trouble since? Or do I go into details and describe the issues?

The people in the juvenile system I spoke to said none of this is online and no one would be able to see it, but I figured I should disclose it anyways, correct?
You only need to disclose if the secondary asks about charges.
AMCAS does not require disclosure of juvenile offenses.
 
OP
H
Aug 22, 2015
14
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Yeah, I know, I'm receiving secondaries now. I was just wondering how much detail I should go into it. Do they want me to tell the story, making excuses, or do they want me to just say the charges and what I have learned since then and not describe exactly what happened?
 

gyngyn

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Yeah, I know, I'm receiving secondaries now. I was just wondering how much detail I should go into it. Do they want me to tell the story, making excuses, or do they want me to just say the charges and what I have learned since then and not describe exactly what happened?
Just tell them what happened and what you learned.
 
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OP
H
Aug 22, 2015
14
0
Status
Pre-Medical
When secondaries ask if I was convicted of a crime do I still list juvenile adjudications? Because apparently I haven't been convicted, I've been adjudicated.
 

Crayola227

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You can't get this expunged?

Seriously ask a lawyer, I don't know what "ajudicated" or whatever means.

If you don't legally have to disclose something per a lawyer, and it can't come up on a background check, I wouldn't disclose to anyone no matter what the **** they said or wanted out of me, but only on the advice of an attorney
 

Goro

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Even with a battery charge, the fact that it happened when you were a child, plus the (implied) fact that you have kept your nose clean since that time tells me that you're not a risky candidate, and while I'd ask you about the charge in interviews, you're most likely to do fine in the admissions process.

Well, a class B battery misdemeanor is Unwanted contact that doesn't result in bodily harm, so hopefully the fact that it wasn't an intent to harm and it was over 11 years ago will be enough to not keep me out of MD and DO schools. Any input on the situation @Goro?
 
OP
H
Aug 22, 2015
14
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Even with a battery charge, the fact that it happened when you were a child, plus the (implied) fact that you have kept your nose clean since that time tells me that you're not a risky candidate, and while I'd ask you about the charge in interviews, you're most likely to do fine in the admissions process.
Thank you, much appreciated. Yes my nose has been clean since the incident.
 

LastWinter

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Jul 2, 2015
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Well, a class B battery misdemeanor is Unwanted contact that doesn't result in bodily harm, so hopefully the fact that it wasn't an intent to harm and it was over 11 years ago will be enough to not keep me out of MD and DO schools. Any input on the situation @Goro?

Brother that is nothing, I know someone who smashed another guy's face into a window and still got into med school (self defense though but he was still charged with property destruction by the owner of the shop).