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I saw this in another thread. How can one do this?


Normally I am just a reader of this forum but thought this post was similar to a friends story so I thought I would share.
A friend in last years graduating class waited to graduate so that he "opted out" of his contract unscathed. In his case, he was applying for med/peds but also ranked some regular peds programs. Apparently he was ranked with some POS program (in his eyes) that does not have a med/peds program. He did research over the interim, reapplied to med/peds this year and got a pretty nice program.
Not sure how useful this is, but hope it helps.
Good luck!
 

FaytlND

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I'm fairly sure that the match agreement says that if you are not eligible to start an ACGME accredited training program for whatever reason (in this case, because you don't have an MD), a waiver of the match results will be granted pending investigation of the circumstances.

Of course, if the investigation shows that you lied or misrepresented yourself, you will be labeled a match violator and become ineligible for future matches. In this case, I suspect it would all depend what they discovered about the circumstances of not graduating. If they believed the person was knowingly preventing their own graduation with the intent of circumventing the match because they were dissatisfied with the results, I don't think it would end well.

Sounds like anyone trying to do something like this is playing with fire.
 

smq123

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If you hate the program that you matched to THAT MUCH that you're willing to pay an extra year of med school tuition to avoid going there, I suppose you could try to find a reason to postpone graduation. Like FaytIND said, though, it could definitely backfire on you.
 

medsRus

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If you hate the program that you matched to THAT MUCH that you're willing to pay an extra year of med school tuition to avoid going there, I suppose you could try to find a reason to postpone graduation. Like FaytIND said, though, it could definitely backfire on you.
Well, one could work out the tuition prorated for the courses needing remediation in most cases. Small price to pay if someone REALLY hates where they matched. It begs the question why put it on the ROL, however, it is understandable that circumstances change or decisions were made on bad advice/understanding.
 

WhoisJohnGalt

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Well, one could work out the tuition prorated for the courses needing remediation in most cases.
I beg to differ. I took less than three months of coursework the year I took maternity leave and paid a full year of tuition because it was "impossible" to pro-rate medical school tuition in any circumstance. Certainly this may be institution dependent, but I would definitely advise NOT to take it for granted that pro-rating can be done without checking first.
 

alittlestory

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To the original poster, and all those who have found themselves contemplating the same question...

here's honesty for you:
- Last year, I matched at my #8. Yes, you read correctly.

- I had the thought of not completing my last elective on time to graduate... just because I was so unhappy with the program I matched at

(Now I know some of you will say that I shouldn't have ranked it-- but in all honesty, who believes they'll get their #8??!)

Long story short-- my gut feeling was right, i should have never started there... and now I've found myself having resigned after 4 months-- suffice it to say, applying to programs end-of-november will get you nowhere. Neither does the scramble.

A simple solution would have been to push back my last elective from May to June... and at my uni, i would have simply had to pay for the elective (not a semester tuition). No blemish or red-flag. No psychological burden. Simple-- I could have enjoyed my time... and gotten ready for 2010.

In retrospect I should have gone with my gut. And hell, even the semesters tuition would have been worth it... but you know hindsight is 20/20.

So yeah, go with your gut... even if that means you purposefully don't graduate on time---- and thats my honest opinion.
 

FaytlND

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Maybe it would have worked. Maybe it wouldn't have. Big risk to take, if you ask me. I don't know what an NRMP investigation is like, but I suspect they would have at least asked you "Why didn't you take the last elective you needed to graduate?" My gut tells me "I just didn't feel like it" wouldn't prove to be an adequate explanation.

Not only that, but you would have to have a pretty good story for next year on the interview trail as to why you didn't graduate on time, even though you could have. If I was a PD, that would immediately start raising red flags.
 

alittlestory

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Maybe it would have worked. Maybe it wouldn't have. Big risk to take, if you ask me. I don't know what an NRMP investigation is like, but I suspect they would have at least asked you "Why didn't you take the last elective you needed to graduate?" My gut tells me "I just didn't feel like it" wouldn't prove to be an adequate explanation.

Not only that, but you would have to have a pretty good story for next year on the interview trail as to why you didn't graduate on time, even though you could have. If I was a PD, that would immediately start raising red flags.
Not really, it's been done before- it will be done again, i'm sure. people just dont talk about it... the most common scenarios are scheduling conflicts, illness, etc...

there are no red-flags to raise if you didn't complete or pass your elective- or even if your temporary training licensing was delayed.

if the guys/girl is in a bad situation- he should go with his gut-- in the end, it's worth it.
 

medsRus

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I beg to differ. I took less than three months of coursework the year I took maternity leave and paid a full year of tuition because it was "impossible" to pro-rate medical school tuition in any circumstance. Certainly this may be institution dependent, but I would definitely advise NOT to take it for granted that pro-rating can be done without checking first.
Of course, one should check with their fin aid dept.
 

FaytlND

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Not really, it's been done before- it will be done again, i'm sure. people just dont talk about it... the most common scenarios are scheduling conflicts, illness, etc...

there are no red-flags to raise if you didn't complete or pass your elective- or even if your temporary training licensing was delayed.

if the guys/girl is in a bad situation- he should go with his gut-- in the end, it's worth it.
There are no red flags if you entered the match, matched, didn't graduate, then re-applied the next year? Barring a very legitimate excuse (of which serious illness/injury is the only one I can imagine), it certainly is going to make programs wonder. Of course, this is all not to mention that there is no guarantee you'll do any better the following year. Assuming you are applying to the same programs, what's to say the same thing wouldn't happen again?

You're right, though, people should do what they feel is best for them. But a "gut decision" in this case is probably not the best idea. You really need to take into account every possible outcome.
 

smq123

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There are no red flags if you entered the match, matched, didn't graduate, then re-applied the next year? Barring a very legitimate excuse (of which serious illness/injury is the only one I can imagine), it certainly is going to make programs wonder. Of course, this is all not to mention that there is no guarantee you'll do any better the following year. Assuming you are applying to the same programs, what's to say the same thing wouldn't happen again?
I kind of have to agree here. Most people will move heaven and earth to avoid graduating late and having to re-enter the Match the following year; the fact that you didn't would seem a little odd. And if you DO apply to the same programs, the same ones who didn't rank you the year before, what makes you think that they'd rank you any better the second time?
 

medsRus

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I kind of have to agree here. Most people will move heaven and earth to avoid graduating late and having to re-enter the Match the following year; the fact that you didn't would seem a little odd. And if you DO apply to the same programs, the same ones who didn't rank you the year before, what makes you think that they'd rank you any better the second time?
Because you now have a year (well less, actually) to do something...
 

smq123

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I matched into a PGY1 spot for Surgery. It was actually my topic choice. I have not signed any contracts yet. I am currently on my SubI, and realizing that I am really hating Surgery (sad this realization comes now). On top of this, I have several pressing family issues going on that are essentially destroying me emotionally.
If you participated in the NRMP match, then you DID "sign a contract yet." By agreeing to participate in the Match, you essentially automatically signed a contract with the program that you matched to. The only way that this might not be true is if you had to scramble (which it sounds like you did not). You have already given your word to this program that you will go there, formally signed contract or not.

That being said, if there are any issues that might keep you from starting July 1st (family issues, physical well-being issues, "I-hate-surgery" issues, whatever), then you need to notify your future program director and the NRMP ASAP. If you have a legitimate reason to get out of the NRMP contract (family issues, you don't think that you can physically complete intern year, etc.), then you need to start the process now.
 

goosew

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Technically, as I remember correctly, entering the match is a "contract"

don't you have to put your "electronic signature" down when you open your NRMP login?