Clinical Experience as Medical Assistant – Specialty & Provider Preference?

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Feb 3, 2021
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So I've just recently finished an medical assisting program and I've been lucky enough to receive a handful of employment opportunities. As I have been evaluating them, I have had a couple of things that have been on my mind, which I am hoping to get additional thoughts on here...

The main reason I am getting into medical assisting is for the clinical experience it will offer, and ideally, the development of a good relationship with a physician who could provide insight into the field and potentially write a good L.O.R. when I apply next year.

I have received opportunities from a neurosurgical clinic, a dermatology clinic, a family medicine clinic, a rheumatology clinic, and a pain management clinic. It appears that each of these will vary in-terms of who will be my supervisor – some of then being a P.A. and others being M.D.

When it comes to L.O.R.'s and the perception of clinical experience by ADCOMs, is one type of specialty viewed as more beneficial or preparatory than another? In addition, only with respect to the L.O.R., would it be better to put myself in a position to work closely with an M.D./D.O. rather than a P.A? Do either of those really matter?
 

candbgirl

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Well to start with, there are very few MD schools that need/want a clinical letter. So don’t pick your job based on a letter. (DO schools usually do require a letter). I’d pick a job where you work primarily with a physician , either MD or DO. You are applying to medical school, not PA school. So work with a doctor. I know that sometime will probably be spent with PAs, nurses, APNs, etc but the majority of your experience should be focused on doctors. Of your list of opportunities I’d probably do rheumatology or family medicine. But it’s up to you.
 
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