IbuSina

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I usually test "INFP" when I take the MBTI: http://typelogic.com/infp.html

We're the idealists, the romantics, looking for harmony, etc {fill in fairy tale}.


Having gotten my degree in psych and having made my first attempt at a clinical program--and dropping out--I find myself going in circles back to psych, like an abused child to his....


Seriously though, the reality of clinical work is far from the sort of thing I had in mind. It's about rescuing people from abuse--often unsuccessful unless it's flagrant physical abuse as opposed to emotional/psychological one, doing paper work, logical problem solving, filling out insurance forms, and worrying about your mortgage. There are few eureka moments. And the psychodynamic approach is often either simply useless or it takes a backseat to naked logic--which a philosopher can apply even better than I can--and the decidedly un-poetic CBT.


I have considered going into consulting psych and the whole dog-eat-dog world of successful psychopaths--aka the business world--but as you can imagine that's even less in accord with my disposition. On the plus side, I won't have to get a PhD, I won't have to feel sorry for my clients, nor will I have to worry about paying my mortgage.


Of course it's all relative and I'm exaggerating for effect, as certain business clients also have a real tough life, living on a mere six figure
salary.

Okay, I think for a first post, this was witty and flashy enough. First impressions are important. So what's your opinion...A-holes!?



 

AcronymAllergy

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I usually test "INFP" when I take the MBTI: http://typelogic.com/infp.html

We're the idealists, the romantics, looking for harmony, etc {fill in fairy tale}.


Having gotten my degree in psych and having made my first attempt at a clinical program--and dropping out--I find myself going in circles back to psych, like an abused child to his....


Seriously though, the reality of clinical work is far from the sort of thing I had in mind. It's about rescuing people from abuse--often unsuccessful unless it's flagrant physical abuse as opposed to emotional/psychological one, doing paper work, logical problem solving, filling out insurance forms, and worrying about your mortgage. There are few eureka moments. And the psychodynamic approach is often either simply useless or it takes a backseat to naked logic--which a philosopher can apply even better than I can--and the decidedly un-poetic CBT.


I have considered going into consulting psych and the whole dog-eat-dog world of successful psychopaths--aka the business world--but as you can imagine that's even less in accord with my disposition. On the plus side, I won't have to get a PhD, I won't have to feel sorry for my clients, nor will I have to worry about paying my mortgage.


Of course it's all relative and I'm exaggerating for effect, as certain business clients also have a real tough life, living on a mere six figure
salary.

Okay, I think for a first post, this was witty and flashy enough. First impressions are important. So what's your opinion...A-holes!?


In my opinion, clinical psychology is not "too harsh" for someone who is strongly empathic and/or "touchy/feely." However, the initial realization that a therapist's job is not to be their clients' friend, advice giver, and personal cheerleader can be a bit jarring to some. As you likely realized in your clinical experiences, you will frequently need to challenge your clients, which may often result in many of them being temporarily upset; this is an unavoidable truth, as there aren't many of us who like being pushed outside of our comfort zones. Conversely, there are still plenty of opportunities to offer encouragement, and to connect (professionally, of course) with your clients.

As for CBT specifically, I'd make the argument that successfully applying its principles--which may seem dry and "logical" at first--with each individual client is nearly an art form in and of itself. Compared with my own therapy efforts, those of seasoned, well-trained clinicians are simply amazing to observe.

In your specific case, it sounds as though you worked predominantly with abuse victims, which can be VERY difficult on even more-experienced psychologists. Perhaps you could give another treatment area a try? Anxiety disorders such as phobia and panic tend to respond very well to CBT-based therapies, and especially in the case of the former (with one session treatments), may offer more of the "eureka" moments for which you're searching.

Finally, yes--even "business clients...living on a mere six figure" income can have very real, and very debilitating, mental health struggles. Psychopathology does not respect boundaries of ethnicity, gender, or socioeconomic status.
 

Markp

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Flashy, yes... Witty, no, not really. Kinda boring and ranting to be honest! I want my 30 seconds back that I wasted reading this drivel.

Mark
 
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IbuSina

IbuSina

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Flashy, yes... Witty, no, not really. Kinda boring and ranting to be honest! I want my 30 seconds back that I wasted reading this drivel.

Mark
Here, I give it back, go check the weather; it's grumpy with a chance of I-am-superior-because-you-can't-make-me-laugh narcissistic clouds in the evening.
 

justme08

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You could do without the excess OP; however, I will say that the lab I work in I have been told and seen that the program itself does not offer much validation to its students if that's what you mean.
 

Ollie123

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I'd make the argument we are actually far too touchy-feely as is, and it has hurt us on a professional level by being overly tolerant of bad scientific practices, bad educational practices, bad clinical practices, etc., and hurt our clients directly as well because people can't differentiate being a friend from being a therapist.

That doesn't excuse being a jerk, but there needs to be a balance. I prefer faculty members who are critical. Ones who aren't are basically useless to students - if everything the students do is fine already, what is the point to their being in school?
 

Therapist4Chnge

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I'd make the argument we are actually far too touchy-feely as is, and it has hurt us on a professional level by being overly tolerant of bad scientific practices, bad educational practices, bad clinical practices, etc., and hurt our clients directly as well because people can't differentiate being a friend from being a therapist.
This.

MOD NOTE: As an aside to the OP, this is a professional forum, so please keep that in mind when posting. -t4c
 

Markp

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Here, I give it back, go check the weather; it's grumpy with a chance of I-am-superior-because-you-can't-make-me-laugh narcissistic clouds in the evening.
Sweet, I knew I saw myself in the clouds... ;)
 
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Being someone who is interested in psychology myself (I have yet to move on to the university level ) , I do find that the concern of personality fit of being a psychologist an issue.

Being in therapy myself, I was expecting something along the lines of psychodynamic therapy (I did not even know that therapies consists of several types back then!) and instead I was directed to a rather dry solution of CBT. (My issue was a case of lack of self esteem)

With respect to the 'dominance' of CBT itself (I understand the importance of EST ),I do find the work of a therapist not as what I have imagined. (More towards the logical side as opposed to the feeling side)

I do think that I understand OP's predicament and I feel myself relating to him.I do hope that experienced clinicians out there could give me a realistic frame of being a clinician.
 

psychmama

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At its best, Psychology practice should blend feeling, thinking, and behavior. There is a unity between affect (emotion) and cognition, and privileging one over other is, at least to me, not helpful. There are a number of therapeutic approaches that integrate emotion and cognition, such as DBT and short term emotion-focused dynamic treatments (see, e.g., Fosha). Personally, I think there will always be a place for psychodynamic theory because it provides a rich understanding of developmental issues and unconscious processes. That said, many of the techniques developed within CBT are invaluable, even when one conceptualizes the client from a psychodynamic perspective. At least that's my view, and many psychologists out there would agree with me. I think there is room in clinical psychology for different "types" of clinicians-- the touchy feely and the more analytical. However, I think that practicing psychology requires a good understanding of both aspects. Being "touchy feely" alone is not enough to really help most clients.
 

AcronymAllergy

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At its best, Psychology practice should blend feeling, thinking, and behavior. There is a unity between affect (emotion) and cognition, and privileging one over other is, at least to me, not helpful. There are a number of therapeutic approaches that integrate emotion and cognition, such as DBT and short term emotion-focused dynamic treatments (see, e.g., Fosha). Personally, I think there will always be a place for psychodynamic theory because it provides a rich understanding of developmental issues and unconscious processes. That said, many of the techniques developed within CBT are invaluable, even when one conceptualizes the client from a psychodynamic perspective. At least that's my view, and many psychologists out there would agree with me. I think there is room in clinical psychology for different "types" of clinicians-- the touchy feely and the more analytical. However, I think that practicing psychology requires a good understanding of both aspects. Being "touchy feely" alone is not enough to really help most clients.
Agreed. When you actually sit and read through the various types of therapies (IPT, CBT, dynamic, etc.), many of their principles are actually very similar concepts expressed using different vocabularies. And yes, there is room to be "touchy feely" as a therapist to an extent; displaying empathy for, and positivity toward, your clients is viewed by many psychologists to be essentially for establishing rapport and fostering the therapeutic relationship. That said, as a psychologist, you are a scientist in everything that you do, and thus all of your actions must--to the greatest extent possible--be guided by scientific methods, theories, principles, and evidence.