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Clinical Psychology in School Settings

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clinpsy18

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I am currently in a Clinical PsyD program with increasing interest in school settings. Have any of you ever heard of a clinical psychologist working in a school setting (not necessarily through the Board of Ed, but in a private school perhaps)? As a clinical psychologist would I be licensed to do this? How would this work? Thanks :).

...No worries---I'm not aiming for an entire field change or anything, I am just wondering if this would be possible as potential part time work ultimately or anything. Thank you again!
 
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lookitssara

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Although many school districts are now hiring mental health counselors in the schools (in addition to school counselors), I have never seen any positions advertised specifically for licensed psychologists in regular public school settings. It is possible that these roles for counselors/therapists could be taken by licensed psychologists however.

Private schools, particularly ones for "troubled" youth may be more likely to have this sort of role. Boarding schools may as well, due to the need for enhanced services. There is no special licensure for clinical psychology in the schools. So long as you met the minimum requirement (licensed clinical psych or LPC, LMFT, LCSW) then you would be eligible.

Also, there are studies regarding mental health services in the schools (see Vernberg from UKansas) that, if they become more widespread, may provide for this sort of role (although again, they usually used psych grad students, not licensed psychologists).
 

aagman01

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Check out National Assoc. of School Psych course requirements, complete these (most of which are probably fulfilled through your psyd), complete a school based practicum for at least 300 total hours, complete the Praxis test for school psychology, and complete a 1200 hour school psychology internship (most pay between $15,000 and $50,000, depending on district). You should be good to go and able to get national certification as a school psychologist!

Although many school districts are now hiring mental health counselors in the schools (in addition to school counselors), I have never seen any positions advertised specifically for licensed psychologists in regular public school settings. It is possible that these roles for counselors/therapists could be taken by licensed psychologists however.

Private schools, particularly ones for "troubled" youth may be more likely to have this sort of role. Boarding schools may as well, due to the need for enhanced services. There is no special licensure for clinical psychology in the schools. So long as you met the minimum requirement (licensed clinical psych or LPC, LMFT, LCSW) then you would be eligible.

Also, there are studies regarding mental health services in the schools (see Vernberg from UKansas) that, if they become more widespread, may provide for this sort of role (although again, they usually used psych grad students, not licensed psychologists).
 

lookitssara

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It should be noted that in the majority of districts, school psychologists are NOT practicing clinical psychology. In some progressive states and districts, the position is what the SP makes of it and fights for. This may include doing some clinical diagnoses and therapy. Unfortunately, however, the position is often funded through special ed funding and thus the SP's role becomes largely one of testing, testing, testing.
 

FadedC

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Well current trends in special education are shifting many school psychologist responsibilities away from testing these days. Intervention monitoring and consultation with teachers has become a much bigger part of responsibilities in many areas. Many of the school psychologists in my area only do a small amount of testing.

But it is true that school psychologists don't do much clinical work. Many are trained to, but it's just outside of their scope of school work for the most part. If a school did want a licensed psychologist to do clinical work though, it's very likely that they would use a certified school psychologist rather then someone who was licensed but not certified.

It should be noted that in the majority of districts, school psychologists are NOT practicing clinical psychology. In some progressive states and districts, the position is what the SP makes of it and fights for. This may include doing some clinical diagnoses and therapy. Unfortunately, however, the position is often funded through special ed funding and thus the SP's role becomes largely one of testing, testing, testing.
 
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