"clinical" vs. "non clinical" schools

hi-speed513

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    How is the best way for someone to choose whether they want to go to a school that has a reputation for being "clinical" (such as Tufts or Temple) or a school that is more focused on research/academics and has higher specialization rates but is less clinical (such as UConn, or Columbia, for example). I know if someone knew from the get-go that they definitely wanted to be a general dentist that a clinical school would be the way to go. As of right now, I have no idea what I would want to do with dentistry in the future and really want to keep my options open--like see what I like once I'm actually IN dental school and go from there. So far I have been accepted to Tufts, UConn, and BU and have had interviews at Columbia and NYU. I think they all had different strengths and weaknesses but I am so confused as to how I should decide whether a "clinical" or "not so clinical but very academic" school would suit my future interests in dentistry best since I have no idea what they are (yet). Any input from current dental students or people starting school this fall that have already chosen their schools would be much appreciated. :)
     

    Temple2007

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      Where would you feel the most comfortable? Do you enjoy long hours of studying or doing lab work? As far a specializing goes your class rank is important as well as your board scores. Lets just say that you go with a clinical school (I chose Temple) there is no reason that you couldn't get into a residency program of your choice. For me its like riding a bike. To master dentistry would you read a manual about bike riding or practice riding a bike. I chose to ride the bike and let others just read about it. Mind you have to take this post as just my opinion. You have to go with what works for you. At a heavy research based college you will be exposed to more book work and that is why there students do so well on the written part of the boards. VIce versa could be said for clinical schools there students will do better on the clinical side of the boards. Exposure to a certian element leads you to excel in it. The longer the exposure the better you will excel in it.
       

      aphistis

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        Originally posted by hi-speed513
        How is the best way for someone to choose whether they want to go to a school that has a reputation for being "clinical" (such as Tufts or Temple) or a school that is more focused on research/academics and has higher specialization rates but is less clinical (such as UConn, or Columbia, for example). I know if someone knew from the get-go that they definitely wanted to be a general dentist that a clinical school would be the way to go. As of right now, I have no idea what I would want to do with dentistry in the future and really want to keep my options open--like see what I like once I'm actually IN dental school and go from there. So far I have been accepted to Tufts, UConn, and BU and have had interviews at Columbia and NYU. I think they all had different strengths and weaknesses but I am so confused as to how I should decide whether a "clinical" or "not so clinical but very academic" school would suit my future interests in dentistry best since I have no idea what they are (yet). Any input from current dental students or people starting school this fall that have already chosen their schools would be much appreciated. :)
        If you're not sure what you want to do, go to a school where you can count on learning to be a general dentist. You can get into any specialty from any school in the country, if that's what you end up deciding. Good luck. :D
         

        blankguy

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          Originally posted by aphistis
          If you're not sure what you want to do, go to a school where you can count on learning to be a general dentist. You can get into any specialty from any school in the country, if that's what you end up deciding. Good luck. :D

          What should I make of % of the class that end up specializing?
          Is it that the program tends to be more competitive in getting people to specialize or is it that the people in that class or school
          tend to show greater interest in specializing?:confused:
           
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