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Co$t of Minne$ota

blueperson

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Nov 29, 2004
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    Why is it so expensive to go to Minnesota? The only public school more expensive is Penn State. I'd like to go to Minnesota but it is so expensive. Are there any statistics on how long it takes a family practitioner to pay back loans?
     

    saki0005

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      blueperson said:
      Why is it so expensive to go to Minnesota? The only public school more expensive is Penn State. I'd like to go to Minnesota but it is so expensive. Are there any statistics on how long it takes a family practitioner to pay back loans?

      we have state funding problems. everytime our former idiot gov or current idiot gov cuts the funding, our tuition goes through the roof.
       

      DrDarwin

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        blueperson said:
        Why is it so expensive to go to Minnesota? The only public school more expensive is Penn State. I'd like to go to Minnesota but it is so expensive. Are there any statistics on how long it takes a family practitioner to pay back loans?

        I read this last week as well. It kind of dampens the biggest benefit of attending one's state school, but I would prefer to attend medical school in a city, and Minneapolis is a pretty cool city. It is also clean and safe. You will probably be paying back loans for quite some time as a GP, but the government can relieve some of your financial burden if you are interested in practicing in a rural area upon graduation.

        As for research vs. clinicial experience, I would assume that U of MN appreciates both. I thought I had enough clinical experience coming into this process, but some of my rejections have led me to believe otherwise. Then again, I was rejected at the seeming epitome of research-oriented schools (i.e., Stanford), and I have almost three years of research experience and a publication. Just be yourself, and you will be accepted if the school likes what it sees. Being candid also decreases the likelihood of any awkward moments during an interview, which may result when an interviewer seeks an explanation for the discrepancy between your experiences and stated career goals, etc.

        Finally, I think research may be a bit overrated, especially at the interview stage. (Warning: what you are about to read is anecdotal). I have only interviewed twice, but none of my interviewers seemed particularly interested in it, and both interviews were at known 'research' institutions. One interviewer did ask me to briefly explain two of my projects, and I actually think I came off as too 'researchy' while doing so. In actuality, I am only interested in possibly fusing research with clincial practice. I guess I will have to see what happens.
         
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