College level math

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by rpames, Sep 9, 2000.

  1. rpames

    rpames Optometrist

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    I've been reading some of my books about med schools and some of the schools require two semesters of college level math. I was wondering what classes qualify. Does college algebra, or does just calculus?
     
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  3. moo

    moo 1K Member

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    It varies from school to school. I'd stick with the calculus... it'll help you with physics and the MCAT (even though it won't test you directly on calculus, having a knowledge of it will help you interpret things better).

    I'm a TA this year for calc 3, so email me if you have any problems.
     
  4. rpames

    rpames Optometrist

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    Thanks for the info. Math is my worst subject so thanks for the offer.
     
  5. Stephen Ewen

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    I once found this in an Algebra textbook:

    "Kelsey told Benji that her two latest art history quiz scores are two consecutive integers whose sum is 174. Help Benji find the scores."

    Can you see it with me? :

    "Hey Kelsey, haven't seen you in a while!"

    "Me neither, what's up, Benji?"

    "Not much." Hey what were your last two art history quizzes?"

    "Oh, they were two consecutive integers whose sum is 174."

    "Uh, Really? Well, uh, okay. Guess I'll see you around, Kelsey."


    Any wonder?

     
  6. doctor_sig

    doctor_sig Member

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    You might consider taking a stats class. That class helped me to understand data interp., which was tremendously helpful on the MCAT.
     
  7. premedmijo

    premedmijo Senior Member

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    You said calculus helps w/ the physics on MCAT. Does this mean I should take a calc-based physics class? I was planning on taking the algbra-based course since I figured I could do better.
     
  8. Djanaba

    Djanaba Senior Member

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    I don't think calc-based physics is that much of a bonus for med-school bound folks -- you'll do fine on the MCAT without it, and it sounds like your GPA will be happier without it. (And, in retrospect, though I took calc and calc-based physics, I regret it and would have rather taken calc I and stats plus regular physics, for reasons of my grades, usefulness of material, and sanity.)

    Of course, the flip side is that people who take calc and calc-based physics have a competitive edge if they excel in those classes. But it doesn't mean they'll be better doctors, and many schools recognize this. Depends on the competitiveness of the school is my guess.
     
  9. "Calculus-based physics" is a huge misnomer, since all physics is calculus based. The only difference between these two courses is that in the calculus based physics the professor will start off with a differential equation and then derive the simplified expression that you will actually use to solve the problem.

    Alot depends on your professor. If he/she expects you to derive the physical laws on the tests, then you will fail the class unless you have a good understanding of calculus. However, if your prof just expects you to know the finalized solution (after all calculus has been done on it) then there is really no difference between a calc-based physics and a normal based physics. My experience is that the vast majority of calc-based physics professors DON'T EVEN TEST on the derivations anyways.

    Moral of the story: 90% of the time, calculus-based physics = noncalculus based physics



    ------------------
    "There is nothing more powerful on this Earth as a man who has nothing to lose. It does not take ten such men to change the world--one will do." Elijah Mohammed
     
  10. Greetings,
    I have taken Algebra, statistics, pre-calculus and calculus. Now I am taking regular Physics. I never knew what I was doing in calculus (somehow I managed to get a B in the course) so that's why I didn't take the calculus based Physics. I found out after I took all those classes that I only needed 2 of them (total of 1 year) to apply to the school I am applying to. That's ok though, they make my transcript appear a bit more impressive. Good luck.
     

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