Colorblind in med school

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by Mike 312, Jun 29, 2000.

  1. Mike 312

    Mike 312 New Member

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    Does anyone think I will have problems in med school because of my colorblindness? I took histology in undergrad and it was not a problem. Any other experiences?
     
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  3. Billie

    Billie An Oldie but a Goodie...

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    Howdy!

    One of my classmates is colorblind and he did fine. We are in our third year now. What special problems he might have had, I don't know. But I am sure you will do okay, esp. since you have already experienced histo.

    Good Luck!
     
  4. NYChief

    NYChief New Member

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    I am red-green colorblind - or so they tell me. I didn't have any trouble with histology as a grad student before med school- and now I'm in my last year of training. It hasn't bothered me...
     
  5. Realchiro

    Realchiro Member

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    Mike32,

    Your comments remind me of a similar experience I had, years ago. I was in a microbiology lab, during a quiz, when I called an instructor over to ask about a question on one station. Under the scope, he asked to differentiate the "purple stained" cells. I don't recall what the specimen was, but I do recall saying that they were "all" purple. At this, he said I needed to test for color blindness. I did, and sure enough I was red-green deficient. Too bad I went that far in life without knowing.

    good topic.
     
  6. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned
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    If histology or immunology or microbiology become a problem with gram stains and thnings like that, there I an alternate stain you can use to help you distinguish G- and G+.
    I think its a brown stain that takes the place of the purple.
    Ask a professor about this.
    I had a colorblind lab partner in microbiology (undergrad) who continually saw all his stains as G+ diplococci. But then again, he was a bit diplococci himself...know what I mean!?



    ------------------
    Joshua Paul Hazelton, CNA, EMT-B
    [email protected]
    University of the Sciences in Philadelphia (2002)
    "D.O. Wannabe"
     
  7. youngjock

    youngjock Banned
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    I wonder how come? do you drive? You finished all your previous classes without any problems? Do you wear colored clothes?

     
  8. Realchiro

    Realchiro Member

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    As posted by youngjoc:

    ""I wonder how come? do you drive? You finished all your previous classes without any problems? Do you wear colored clothes?""

    Actually, I realized that I seemed to prefer alot of bright colors, especially in clothes, as apparently I appreciated them more.....

    Interestingly, I had a friend, who was completely color deficient and it showed in his driving. He could not distinguish the yellow light from the red, on a traffic signal, and only did so by their position on the light fixture... It made for some hairy experiences when we went out to party...

    interesting post.

     

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