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coming to the states

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by footsie, Apr 17, 2004.

  1. footsie

    footsie Member
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    Afternoon chaps,
    I'm a 1st year studying in a medical school in England at the moment. I think it would be really cool to go to a uni America for a while, like an exchange ... but I've looked or ages and not found anything about any med schools in USA that do it. From what I can see, most of you are yanks ;) does anybody know whether their med school offers a scheme like this?
    Thanks, love you all
    Katie xxx
     
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  3. moo

    moo 1K Member
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    Most med schools will allow you to take an elective or two during your last year of training. You can't really do an exchange before completing your basic sciences and core rotations (peds, surgery, medicine, ob/gyne, family practice).
     
  4. southerndoc

    southerndoc life is good
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    Are you wanting to just take a couple electives? If so, then that should be rather easy to set up with any school/hospital you are interested in. (Just look on a school's website for away electives or visiting student rotations.)

    If you're talking about transferring, then that would be impossible unless you already hold a bachelor's degree. Nearly all US medical schools require a bachelors. When I was in England, medical students went into medical school straight out of high school. I'm assuming that has not changed and that medical school there is 6 years leading to a MBBS degree.

    Having said that, if you do an away rotation, you will probably find yourself better than most US students. British medical students and physicians are master diagnosticians and clinicians. We Americans have become too dependent on ancillary testing, mainly because it's more readily available here than in the UK (thanks NHS, eh?).
     
  5. IlianaSedai

    IlianaSedai Senior Member
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    By pure coincidence, I looked this up over the weekend in order to find out how to apply for an elective in the UK (for me). Here is what you do:

    It is rather pointless to do a stateside exchange during your basic science years, and I do not believe this option would be available to you. (Because we are on what you would think of as a graduate-entry four-year course, our basic sciences are two years and fast-paced, and often the subjects are organised differently.)

    However, it is very easy to do a clinical elective here. Most students on both sides of the pond do it during their final year, I think. Electives typically last 4 - 8 weeks and are arranged more or less the same way as you would when rotating through another hospital in the UK. You may do as many electives here as your home university allows you to do. There are two ways you can arrange an elective clinical attachment:

    1) Directly contacting teaching hospitals. Most teaching hospitals have on their web site a page that provides information for students about how to arrange an elective. Perhaps if you can tell us what specialty you wish to do an elective in (e.g. general internal medicine? general surgery? psychiatry? anaesthesia? etc), someone here may be able to find a list of electives for you. Usually lists are posted on the web sites of the professional associations for that specialty.

    2) Going to your home university and asking the person who coordinates your electives whether they have established partnerships with any US medical schools to exchange students. Some universities have exchange agreements; otherwise, you can just apply directly (see #1 above).

    Either way, taking a clinical elective abroad is very common in both UK and US universities. There is probably an office or administrative contact at your own uni whose job is to help students arrange electives. This should probably be your first place to go. :) Some teaching hospitals provide malpractice insurance coverage for visiting students; a few do not, so you may have to arrange your own. From what I have read, it seems most UK universities will cover for electives in Europe, but possibly not in the US or Canada. I believe that if you are a UK medical student, you are eligible to register for free membership to the Medical Defence Union (UK) which does offer some sort of malpractice coverage plan that's good for US and Canadian electives.

    And http://www.scutwork.com/ is a good site to read student reviews of different electives within the US. You would probably want to apply for electives at which other students have had positive experiences. ;)
     
  6. IlianaSedai

    IlianaSedai Senior Member
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    That's bull. We depend on a barrage of expensive tests to cover our butts from lawsuits. :p
     
  7. southerndoc

    southerndoc life is good
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    Well, that too... :)

    Judson will soon be here to the tort system's defense.
     

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