Pooh Chong

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Hi everyone,

I would grateful for anyone who could clarify my options to me...

I'm an osteopathic student who has passed my Comlex Level I and Comlex Level II CE and PE. I've also electively taken USMLE step I and USMLE Step II CK, but not the CS.

I'm going into an allopathic program.

What are my exam options? Do I need to take the Comlex III or under some circumstances am I allowed to take USMLE Step III? Are there any pros/cons to either?
 

box29

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http://www.aacom.org/InfoFor/applicants/becoming/Pages/ExamsLicensure.aspx

Osteopathic physicians are eligible for licensure in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and other territories and areas of the United States and Canada. Licensure is determined by each state through the appropriate licensing board.

In order to be licensed as an osteopathic physician, one must:

* Graduate from an accredited U.S. college of osteopathic medicine.
* Successfully complete the Comprehensive Osteopathic Licensure Examination (COMLEX), Levels I, II, III and PE. This examination is administered by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME). Level I of the exam is taken after the second year of medical school prior to the last two years of clerkship training. Level II is taken at the end of the clinical clerkship years prior to graduating from osteopathic medical school. Level III is taken prior to the end of the internship year. The COMLEX-PE is an examination developed to test physical examination skills.
 

Hayduke

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Hi everyone,

I would grateful for anyone who could clarify my options to me...

I'm an osteopathic student who has passed my Comlex Level I and Comlex Level II CE and PE. I've also electively taken USMLE step I and USMLE Step II CK, but not the CS.

I'm going into an allopathic program.

What are my exam options? Do I need to take the Comlex III or under some circumstances am I allowed to take USMLE Step III? Are there any pros/cons to either?
To sit for the USMLE Step 3 you must take Step 2 CS. USMLE 3 is not available to you now.
You need to ask your self "is it worth $1200 more plus the step 3 cost?" If it is then get a CS slot now.
 
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Pooh Chong

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k, so I think i'll be taking the Comlex III.

So my residency manager advised me that most residents in their program take the USMLE III during the 2nd year of residency. Do I, taking the Comlex, need to take the Comlex during my intern year or can I also take it during the 2nd year of my allopathic residency?
 

InductionAgent

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You can wait to take it till 3rd year or later if you want, but I would strongly advise taking it as soon as possible, while your medical knowledge base is as broad as possible. Get the thing knocked out.

k, so I think i'll be taking the Comlex III.

So my residency manager advised me that most residents in their program take the USMLE III during the 2nd year of residency. Do I, taking the Comlex, need to take the Comlex during my intern year or can I also take it during the 2nd year of my allopathic residency?
 

InductionAgent

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So I'm assuming that you took USMLE Step 3 instead. In most states with combined licensing boards for MD/DO, that will do just fine. However, in states with separate osteopathic licensing boards (and there are more than just the 5 Nazi states), there could be problems in getting licensed.

Hm. I never took COMLEX III so I guess I'm not an osteopathic physician. Darn it.
 

novado

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That is true. Those five states that require your osteopathic internship or some kind of approval for your allo internship/residency would require you to take COMLEX. Otherwise, you will be fine with USMLE 3. My program wanted me to take USMLE 3, but I did not take the USMLE CS, so they were ok with me taking COMLEX 3. I took it as soon as possible, which I would also advise you to do. No one cares what you get as long as you pass. Don't wait that long. That way you may be able to moonlight with your license earlier.
 

group_theory

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In addition to the 5 states that require an osteopathic intern year (and COMLEX), there are a few additional states that require COMLEX.

States that require COMLEX for licensure
California
Florida
Michigan (for initial licensure) - will take USMLE for reciprocity
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Tennessee (for initial licensure) - will take USMLE for reciprocity only
Vermont (COMLEX, NBOME, FLEX)
West Virginia
 

Old_Mil

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Ok, I do believe I have an answer for Ohio...

Acceptable Examination Sequence
Endorsement of Diplomate or Licentiate Status
If other eligibility requirements are met, diplomate status with the National Board of Medical Examiners or
the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners, or licentiate status with the Medical Council of
Canada, may be directly endorsable to Ohio, without further examination requirements.

Endorsement of USMLE or Acceptable Examination Combination
An applicant who has not previously held a license from another state is eligible for consideration if other
eligibility requirements are met and the applicant has passed one of the following examination
combinations:
1. Part I of the National Board of Medical Examiners examination or Step 1 of the USMLE, Part II of the
National Board of Medical Examiners examination or Step 2 of the USMLE, and Part III of the National
Board of Medical Examiners examination or Step 3 of the USMLE or Component 2 of the FLEX. All Steps,
Parts, or Components must have been administered prior to January 2000. The score achieved on each
Step, Part, or Component must have equaled or exceeded the figure established by the USMLE Program,
the National Board of Medical Examiners or the Federation of State Medical Boards as a passing score for
that Step, Part, or Component, respectively; or
2. Component I of the FLEX and Step 3 of the USMLE. The Component and Step must have been
administered prior to January 2000. A performance of 75 or above must have been achieved on
Component I. The performance achieved on Step 3 must have been recognized by the USMLE program as
a recommended passing performance; or
3. USMLE Steps 1, 2, and 3. All three Steps must have been passed within a seven-year period and the
performance achieved on each Step must have been recognized by the USMLE program as a
recommended passing performance. A limited exception to this rule may be granted to an applicant who in
conjunction with a medical degree is actively pursuing a doctoral degree in an institution or program
accredited by the LCME and regional university accrediting body and the applicant was a student in good
standing when enrolled in the institution or program. The doctoral degree must be in a field of biological
sciences tested in the step 1 content. These fields include, but are not necessarily limited to, anatomy,
biochemistry, physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, genetics, neuro-science and molecular biology.
Fields not accepted include, but are not necessarily limited to, business, economics, ethics, history and
other fields not directly related to biological science. Limited exceptions to this rule may also be granted to
an applicant who suffered from a significant health condition which by its severity would necessarily cause a
delay to the applicant’s medical study, or as the board deems appropriate. Regardless, all three steps must
have been passed within a ten year prior; however, the board may grant further exception beyond the ten
year period for those applicants who have obtained a medical degree in conjunction with a doctoral degree
in a field of biological sciences tested in the step 1 content from an institution or program described in this
paragraph; taken step 1 of the USMLE prior to December 1, 1999; have not failed any step of the USMLE;
and have shown good cause for why they did not complete the examination sequence in a ten year period;
a limited exception to this rule may also be granted by the board to an applicant who passes all three steps
within a ten-year period if the applicant shows good cause for whey he or she did not complete the
examination sequence in a seven-year period and has not failed any step of the USMLE three times or
more. Good cause requires a showing that the applicant is current in his or her medical knowledge at the
time of application. Good causes includes, but is not limited to, participating in graduate medical education
as defined in Ohio Revised Code section 4731.091 for a period of time greater than that required by statute
for initial licensure in Ohio; or
4. COMLEX-USA levels 1, 2 and 3. All three levels must have been passed within a seven year period and
the performance achieved on each level must have been recognized by the NBOME as a recommend
passing performance. A limited exception to this rule may be granted to an applicant who in conjunction
with a medical degree is actively pursuing a doctoral degree in an institution accredited by the AOA and
regional university accrediting body and the applicant was a student in good standing when enrolled in the
institution or program. The doctoral degree must be in a field of biological sciences tested in the level 1
content. These fields include, but are not necessarily limited to, anatomy, biochemistry, physiology,
microbiology, pharmacology, genetics, neuro-science and molecular biology. Fields not accepted include,
but are not necessarily limited to, business, economics, ethics, history and other fields not directly related to
biological science. Limited exceptions to this rule may also be granted to an applicant who suffered from a
significant health condition which by its severity would necessarily cause a delay to the applicant’s medical
study, or as the board deems appropriate. Regardless, all three levels must have been passed within a ten
year prior; however, the board may grant further exception beyond the ten year period for those applicants
who have obtained an osteopathic medical degree in conjunction with a doctoral degree in a field of
biological sciences tested in the level 1 content from an institution or program described in this paragraph;
taken level 1 of the COMLEX-USA prior to December 1, 1999; have not failed any level of the COMLEXUSA;
and have shown good cause for why they did not complete the examination sequence in a ten year
period; a limited exception to this rule may also be granted by the board to an applicant who passes all
three steps within a ten-year period if the applicant shows good cause for whey he or she did not complete
the examination sequence in a seven-year period and has not failed any step of the COMLEX-USA three
times or more. Good cause requires a showing that the applicant is current in his or her medical knowledge
at the time of application. Good causes includes, but is not limited to, participating in graduate medical
education as defined in Ohio Revised Code section 4731.091 for a period of time greater than that required
by statute for initial licensure in Ohio; or
5. Component 1 and 2 of the FLEX. Both components must have been administered prior to January 2000.
The score achieved on each component must have equaled or exceeded the figure established by the
FLEX program as a passing score for that component.
...sounds like the answer is "yes".
 

StringBean

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Hmmm, I was really under the impression that DOs HAD to take all 3 COMLEX exams to be licensed to practice. So that's not true? A DO can take COMLEX 1 & 2, then USMLE 3 and be eligible for licensure? So why bother taking the COMLEX at all then?
 

Arch Guillotti

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Hmmm, I was really under the impression that DOs HAD to take all 3 COMLEX exams to be licensed to practice. So that's not true? A DO can take COMLEX 1 & 2, then USMLE 3 and be eligible for licensure? So why bother taking the COMLEX at all then?
You have to take all 3 COMELEX exams to be licensed in certain states but not all. You have to take COMLEX I/II to graduate. AFAIK you jave to take either exam in series and can't mix or match.
 

NKMU

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One good reason to take COMLEX 3 instead of USMLE 3:

COMLEX is only one day, vs. two days for USMLE.