Community College to Pharmacy school

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Diamondeve21

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I am currently a student at a community college in CA. My current GPA is 3.8 and I also work at Wal-mart pharmacy. I plan to apply to pharmacy school in fall of 2006. Does any one what are my chances of getting accepted into pharmacy schools from community colleges? My top schools are the three yr schools w/o PCAT requirements such as MCPHS, USN, LECOM, Albany... I hear that w/o a bachelor's degree, I dont even stand a chance. Also the fact that Im from a community college which doesnt help my stat.. Based on your past experience, do I stand a chance? Im really really really worried... :( :scared: Please please give me some advice... Thanks for all your help!!!

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Apply anyway when you're done with your prereqs. It couldn't hurt. I did a rotation at Wal-Mart with a student from Massachusetts' accelerated program. He's a Maryland resident and did his prepharm at a community college. Maryland didn't accept him, but he got into the accelerated program in Massachusetts and just graduated there this year. Pretty cool if you ask me -- finish a year sooner although he didn't get the benefit of in state tuition.

If you don't get accepted anywhere is when you should ask the schools what you could do to improve your chances -- be it taking the PCAT, doing more extra curriculars, or even taking some classes at a university, etc. Don't sweat it yet. Even though it's gotten competitive, there are still schools that will accept community college only grads.
 
I went to a small CC. The first year I went through the Pharmacy Tech program and got certified. Before this I had NO college credits. I worked at Wal-Mart pharmacy part-time after that. I got my pre-reqs the following two years at the same CC. During this time I left Wal-Mart to work in an independent compounding pharmacy. In the summer of '04, I applied to Mercer as soon as the application process opened. I was in the first group interviewed in Sept. '04. I found out three weeks later I was accepted. It is possible to go to a CC for all your pre-reqs and get into pharmacy school. My grade point average at the time was a 4.0(I've had organic since then, I made a B), I took the PCAT once and made a 74. I was an active leader in the pharmacy club at our CC. I didn't have much community service because I work 30+ hrs a week, am married, and have 3 kids.

I could have gone to the local university, but it could not have had the individual attention I received at the CC. There are many students that have gone the CC route that are in pharmacy school after just two years of pre-reqs.
 
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This has been discussed several times on the forum. It may be helpful to do a search.

With that said, a 4-year degree isn't necessary, but it will make you more competitive. I think in the not-so-distant future, the schools will begin requiring a 4-year degree prior to matriculation.

The PCAT isn't really that bad, and it allows you to be able to apply to more schools. Why limit yourself?
 
I went to (am actually finishing up this semester) a community college. I applied to 3 in state schools and have had interviews for 2, accepted to 1 so far.. my point-community or state college may not matter as much as you have been told. Also, I don't have a bachelor's degree. I will only have my associate's at the end of this semester. You stand just as good of chance as anyone.

As someone else said, the PCAT isn't that horrible. Don't let it be the deciding factor as to which schools you apply to. Take it, you may surprise yourself. Also try studying for it when you don't have regular school classes, it's kinda tough with regular coursework. Good luck!! :thumbup:
 
fairyofsong said:
I went to (am actually finishing up this semester) a community college. I applied to 3 in state schools and have had interviews for 2, accepted to 1 so far.. my point-community or state college may not matter as much as you have been told. Also, I don't have a bachelor's degree. I will only have my associate's at the end of this semester. You stand just as good of chance as anyone.

As someone else said, the PCAT isn't that horrible. Don't let it be the deciding factor as to which schools you apply to. Take it, you may surprise yourself. Also try studying for it when you don't have regular school classes, it's kinda tough with regular coursework. Good luck!! :thumbup:


Thanks to all of you guys who replied... um... what gpa ranges should I retain to be a competitive applicant? and do you guys know which schools are easiest to get accepted into? thanks
 
Diamondeve21 said:
Thanks to all of you guys who replied... um... what gpa ranges should I retain to be a competitive applicant? and do you guys know which schools are easiest to get accepted into? thanks

Again, you can find a lot of answers by searching the forum. Also, read the FAQs (link in my signature) for helpful application tips and answers.

Keep in mind that all schools are competitive and that competition will more than likely increase year after year.
 
Thanks again to every1 who gave me advice.. Does any one know any pharmacy school w/an "easy" acceptance reputation? Thanks
 
HICP? :eek:

Try looking at new programs (SIUE, University of the Incarnate Word, etc.)
 
Sosumi said:
Apply anyway when you're done with your prereqs. It couldn't hurt. I did a rotation at Wal-Mart with a student from Massachusetts' accelerated program. He's a Maryland resident and did his prepharm at a community college. Maryland didn't accept him, but he got into the accelerated program in Massachusetts and just graduated there this year. Pretty cool if you ask me -- finish a year sooner although he didn't get the benefit of in state tuition.

If you don't get accepted anywhere is when you should ask the schools what you could do to improve your chances -- be it taking the PCAT, doing more extra curriculars, or even taking some classes at a university, etc. Don't sweat it yet. Even though it's gotten competitive, there are still schools that will accept community college only grads.


Your friend got out 1 year sooner and work. That should be more than enough to cover the difference between in state and out state. :thumbup:
 
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