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computer in med school

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by summerb, Apr 16, 1999.

  1. summerb

    summerb Member

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    I'm wondering what advice current med students have on whether or not it's important to have a computer in med school. And if so, would you recommend a laptop or a desktop? I'm sure it varies somewhat depending on the school you attend, so what about UHS? Thanks.
     
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  3. Diane E

    Diane E Member

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    Please comment MS1/2's I think this is a good topic that many of the incoming MS1's are pondering. Computers at UHS are optional, there are many study rooms on campus that have them. However, if you get a computer you can log in from home, hence saving at-school time and view required lecture notes/slides etc... I think a computer may be useful to browse web-links for presentations.
    [​IMG] Diane
    UHS-COM 2003

    ------------------
     
  4. Henry

    Henry Senior Member

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    Laptop is always the best, if you can afford it. Some of our classmate use it for class notes.

    However, I still recommend med student should have at least a PC at home. I found it so inconvenient to use the school computer at night. Having your own PC will help you in many ways.
     
  5. justwannabadoc

    justwannabadoc Senior Member

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    Laptops were once required at KCOM. I think now they are just highly recommended. The reason is that most if not all class notes are available on KCOM's server. Thus, you can download them and bring them to class with you on your laptop. I guess you could also just print out the notes and bring them to class. It really depends on each school and whether lecture material is available on computer. I don't know if we will have to make presentations but if you do, having a computer (laptop or desktop) with Microsoft Powerpoint is a must. Get a desktop if you don't plan on ever bringing your computer to class. Much cheaper and better. But a laptop is convenient.
     
  6. mevannorden

    mevannorden Member

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    A computer is definitely helpful. Depending on how your school's rotations are set up, a laptop might be useful. I plan on travelling quite a bit for my third and fourth year, so a laptop will be handy. They're getting cheap too, as are desktop PC's. However, if you don't really have the money for a computer, I think it's entirely possible to live without one. I rarely use mine, of course it's a 486 and slow as heck!
     
  7. Deb

    Deb Senior Member

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    I think every med student should have a computer at home. At UHS all study
    rooms have computers, but there are many more students than rooms so having
    one at home allows you to avoid the mob scene before tests. I have "PC
    Anywhere" which lets me hook up from home (it costs about $70). However,this
    software has some limits depending on your own system (I have a pentuim I).
    For example, it is WORTHLESS when it comes to studying histo slides (it takes
    5-10 min to download one slide and the color and detail leave much to be
    desired). Path slides are not available on the school computer (we use old
    fashioned slides and laser disk). Other than that I haven't had any problems.
    For presentations, it's nice to be able to do literature searches from home (use
    medscape or grateful med). Also, at UHS powerpoint is already installed in the
    schools' system, so don't worry about that. As for class notes, you will be given
    lecture guides for most classes (you'll just jot down things here and there...
    they're pretty comprehensive) and note pool usually includes the slides presented
    during lecture. By the way, only one person brought a laptop to class...everyone
    laughed at him. Needless to say, after that he left it at home. If you're buying a
    computer I agree that you should look at laptops, since you might not want to lug
    around a desktop during rotations.


    [This message has been edited by Deb (edited April 17, 1999).]
     
  8. TP

    TP Member

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    Deb-
    I going to UHS this fall. Do you guys do a lot of presentations in med school? Can you give some examples of what you guys present? Are there reports or papers? I'm probably misinformed but i thought the first 2 years are pretty much just test-taking while you do presentations (as well as take exams) during rotations.
     
  9. Deb

    Deb Senior Member

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    During the first yr we did group presentations in biochem (several) and
    neuro (one). There were also several group papers required for biochem,
    but they weren't papers per se just a list of questions that you answered
    as a group. The second yr we did individual presentations in micro (two)
    and path (three). In neuro and path you get to choose your own case. The
    path exercises were especially helpful as they are designed to prepare you
    for giving "the bullet" during rotations. When you only have 1-2 min to
    explain a case, you learn to be thorough, but succinct. It's great practice
    since it's not quite as easy as it looks and you don't want to look like an
    idiot in front of your attending.
     

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