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Computer Science Major??

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by KingTutATL, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. KingTutATL

    KingTutATL Senior Member
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    People on SDN seem to shy away from CSCI majors. I was just wondering why? It would seem no different than a Business Degree and just taking the pre reqs. Are there any CSCI majors on here?
     
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  3. jebus

    jebus Membership Revoked
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    I thought about CS. Then I tried it. It's hard as hell. That was the end of that experiment.
    Seriously, I think those kind of interdisciplinary skills (especially CS and medicine, for instance) would probably be really valuable. I don't think it matters what your major is; it does seem no different than getting a degree in bizness or music and fulfilling the pre-reqs. Good luck with your app. You'll be fine.
     
  4. glp

    glp Vegas Baby Vegas
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    i was a cs major in undergrad. but at that time i wasnt planning on going to med school. it was hard as hell but totally worth it, i think. i was an econ mojor as well. i think there is a significant difference in the work load between cs and econ/business though. so keep that in mind.
     
  5. jeffsleepy

    jeffsleepy Senior Member
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    I majored in EECS and don't regret my decision, although I do feel that it was a somewhat more difficult path. I think it does make you standout somewhat, and I ended up highlighting my experience in both my personal statement and in my interviews. One thing that you can bring up is how CS, unlike biology, is focused on large projects and problem solving and how that relates to taking care of patients. Or you can bring up how medicine is getting increasingly technological.

    Most adcoms don't know and don't care about how strenuous your major is, but there are exceptions. One of my student interviewers had a cousin who was a PhD candidate at my program, so she knew exactly what I was talking about and commented on it.
     
  6. theblastopore

    theblastopore Senior Member
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    I studied CS, and I liked it. There are pros and cons for each major you choose. I think CS is fun, helps with problem-solving skill, and is a good back-up major. On the other hand, it's harder to keep high GPA in CS and, of course, it'll take longer with med school pre-reqs.
     
  7. Orth2006

    Orth2006 Senior Member
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    I studied CSE (Computer Systems Engineering). It was challenging but overall great. In the event that you change you mind about med school, you still have a wonderful career to fall back to. I cherish my experience so far working as a systems engineer. It is definitely a great prep for med school - not in terms of the subject matter(biology, chemistry etc) but in terms of the skills needed to go through med school and to be a doctor. That is analytical, problem solving, detail oriented, effectiveness and efficiency conscious and many more. I would say go for it and good luck :)
     
  8. Dave_D

    Dave_D Senior Member
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    Well I'm another CS major.(Actually worked professionally as a software engineer) Cool major but the thing I found was alot people think CS means you learn how to code, not how to think and solve logic problems effectively. Actually at my last job I had a co-worker who only cared about the actual coding and wouldn't think anything through before he did it.(He hadn't gone to college. Boy was he terrible as an engineer, go ahead and ask me about his boolean function :D
     
  9. glp

    glp Vegas Baby Vegas
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    ya, it is sometimes frustrating when people assume that being a cs major means you went to college to learn how to fix computers.
     
  10. Captain Fantastic

    Physician 10+ Year Member

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    Add me to the list of CS grads. I spent 5 years as a software engineer writing mission computer code for the F/A-18 SuperHornet.

    The education gave me a firm foundation in problem solving, critical thinking, applying my knowledge base to new problems, and how to use reference material. Working really honed my skills in doing all of that quickly and efficiently. I'm happy with that background going into medicine.

    The coursework is more difficult, no doubt. My unversity recognizes that in the way it awards latin honors. Engineering majors are awarded honors at 3.5 (cum laude), 3.7 (magna cum laude), and 3.9 (summa cum laude). Science majors are held to 3.7, 3.8, 3.9 respectively. (Although fat chance the adcom recognizes that fact.)

    If you're looking for a fall-back it's a pretty good one, too. I was making serious bank before I went back to knock-out the med pre-reqs.
     
  11. jcstack001

    jcstack001 Junior Member
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    I was a CS major and am working as a Software Developer right now. One of my roommates in college was a business major and comparing our workloads, I would say that computer science is much, much more difficult.

    However, it can be extremely fun, both the coding and the theory, and is has been very useful. I am taking a year and working before medical school (hopefully, not 2+ years) and I have found a lot of freelance work.

    Do which ever one interests you more, do not worry that much about your grades when choosing a major. If you enjoy what you are doing, you will do, at least, moderately well (most of the time...)
     
  12. newguy357

    newguy357 Senior Member
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    I have degrees in computer science and physics.

    I chose csci before knowing I wanted to do medicine. Actually had no idea what I wanted to do so it was a default. Computer science is soooo easy it's a joke. Well, easy intellectually, I should say, since there are no concepts that are difficult to understand. That said it is "difficult" but only in the fact that you have to spend long periods of time staring at the screen beating your head against the wall to find some stupid little bug in your code. I interviewed at a med. school just a couple days ago and one question they asked was if I had any regrets with my undergraduate experience. My answer? My only regret was getting a computer science degree and I hope to never use it again. It is virtually the opposite of medicine--sitting alone staring at blinking screens instead of interacting with others. Maybe that's why not many people interested in medicine do csci. If you want to help people, why would you? I also did physics but that's because after my csci classes I wanted some actual intellectual stimulation. csci is like biology in the sense that it takes a lot of time but there is nothing conceptually difficult about it.
     

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