Congrats to those who matched- A little help for those of us still on the Journe

Jun 12, 2009
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Hey all,

This is my first post in the radiology forum. Unfortunately my exposure to radiology was late in my medical school career, and I thoroughly enjoy the field. That being said, with average board scores etc I chose not to apply to the match. I have secured a radiology research position for next year, but was looking into an advanced Radiology degree in physics etc. that would help my chances (a masters degree). Do any of you know if these exist?

I am one of those people who has (finally at this stage) found their passion in medicine. I am committed to radiology no matter how long it takes, as I finally feel that this is a field that "fits" for me. As a side note, I will be an American graduate from an MD school in the US.

Thank you all for your help. Best of luck to those who matched. Have fun on your way to the top

-E
 

Labslave

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Hey all,

This is my first post in the radiology forum. Unfortunately my exposure to radiology was late in my medical school career, and I thoroughly enjoy the field. That being said, with average board scores etc I chose not to apply to the match. I have secured a radiology research position for next year, but was looking into an advanced Radiology degree in physics etc. that would help my chances (a masters degree). Do any of you know if these exist?

I am one of those people who has (finally at this stage) found their passion in medicine. I am committed to radiology no matter how long it takes, as I finally feel that this is a field that "fits" for me. As a side note, I will be an American graduate from an MD school in the US.

Thank you all for your help. Best of luck to those who matched. Have fun on your way to the top

-E
I don't know much about masters level physics physics programs that would be applicable to radiology, but if I were you, I would continue with the research position you have lined up. This would allow you to get a good LOR, make contacts in the field, and hopefully have a better shot at the program where you're doing research (not to mention the fact that masters programs are usually insanely expensive). I think it would be interesting to do the masters level work (and it would certainly be unique), but I wouldn't use it to replace your research position.

Congrats on finding something within medicine that you're passionate about. If you continue to work hard, you'll be able to overcome the mediocre scores, etc. Good luck!
 

BenFelson

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When I was in residency years ago, we had a designated "superstar" who was in an MD/PhD program working on MRI. This was at MD Anderson where there is a lot of pioneering work. That background did help him.
Anyway, he had the choice rotations, perks like paid attendance at national meetings etc.
He ended up in private practice. It was his game all along.
Good luck.
BF
 

colbgw02

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Just my opinion, but I wouldn't set out to get a degree of any sort unless you actually enjoyed radiologic physics. The depth of physics knowledge to be a practicing radiologist is much different than that needed to be a radiologic physicist. If you feel that your application isn't competitive enough, then I think you would be much better off investing your time in getting published than getting a degree. Again, if physics is your passion, then that's different.