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nolite te bastardes carborundorum
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Found this at thanksgiving at a relatives house. It's from the August 2013 consumer reports in an an article titled "Dr. Who?" I think it's pretty blatantly biased. Do you guys agree?

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I don't know. I don't really see a biased. Each time it says DO can do the same things as MD as well. As DO is less known about around the country, it needs to be explained a bit more, as I think they do.
 

Roxas

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Yeah I guess I fail to see where it seems biased
 

Fedxup

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I don't think they were intentionally trying to be biased... though to be honest the should have just copied and pasted the description from the MD row down to the DO row.
Agreed. Only difference I see is the failure to mention Bachelor's for D.O.
 
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nolite te bastardes carborundorum
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From the way it's written I think it wasn't clear that a bachelor's degree is required.

Also I thought referring to a DO as an "osteopath" was a no-no.
 
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TheBDP

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From the way it's written I think it wasn't clear that a bachelor's degree is required.

Also I thought referring to a DO as an "osteopath" was a no-no.
Most definitely a no-no
 

Fedxup

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From the way it's written I think it wasn't clear that a bachelor's degree is required.

Also I thought referring to a DO as an "osteopath" was a no-no.
It seems to be published in some amateur new paper, am I correct?

Because I am sure some would have caught the periods for the D.O. instead of it being "DO"
 

cliquesh

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From the way it's written I think it wasn't clear that a bachelor's degree is required.

Also I thought referring to a DO as an "osteopath" was a no-no.
Some DOs refer to themselves as osteopaths.

I think you're being a little too sensitive. You will probably have a few experiences in med school/residency/real world in regards to anti-DOism that are going to be way worse than that.

When I say a few, I'm talking about only a handful of negative experiences. It's not a big deal.
 
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nolite te bastardes carborundorum
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It seems to be published in some amateur new paper, am I correct?

Because I am sure some would have caught the periods for the D.O. instead of it being "DO"
I found it in consumer reports which I always thought was reputable
 
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nolite te bastardes carborundorum
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Some DOs refer to themselves as osteopaths.

I think you're being a little too sensitive. You will probably have a few experiences in med school/residency/real world in regards to anti-DOism that are going to be way worse than that.

When I say a few, I'm talking about only a handful of negative experiences. It's not a big deal.
I actually had no idea that some DOs call themselves osteopaths.

And that's totally fair, you are probably right.
 

Fedxup

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I found it in consumer reports which I always thought was reputable
Consumer report is highly reputable. But for some reason I can't get over the missing periods haha:confused:
 

Bacchus

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I find it offensive. It's written as to say that we are not equal based on the word choice of the author.
 

Bacchus

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Is this available online? I'd like to send an editorial or correction to the editor of the section.
 

mcloaf

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I find it offensive. It's written as to say that we are not equal based on the word choice of the author.
"Practice as medical doctors do in any specialty area" is not equal?
 

Ibn Alnafis MD

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I think you guys are being a little too sensitive. I mean who cares? Once you graduate MEDICAL school you'll be referred to as physicians. DO and MD = physician. That's something no one can argue with. NP/Dentists/Lawyers/English professors can call themselves doctors. That's fine by me. But only those who went to medical school can call themselves physician.
 
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nolite te bastardes carborundorum
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Is this available online? I'd like to send an editorial or correction to the editor of the section.
I couldn't find it. You have to pay for a subscription from them the only reason I saw this is because my cousin's husband gets it.

I think you could probably still write a letter to the editor calling for a correction
 
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I do not think its biased its just showing two types of Physicians. If you want to see biased articles look at the stuff by Dr. Barrett, or look up the article on Forbes "Osteopaths vs Doctors", now that is biased.

The reality is that you will run into people who will ask you what a DO is, and you will need to explain your education and training to some people.
 

Roxas

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I think you guys are being a little too sensitive. I mean who cares? Once you graduate MEDICAL school you'll be referred to as physicians. DO and MD = physician. That's something no one can argue with. NP/Dentists/Lawyers/English professors can call themselves doctors. That's fine by me. But only those who went to medical school can call themselves physician.
You have to be careful though because NDs call themselves "physicians" as well who supposedly graduated medical school.
 

Ibn Alnafis MD

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You have to be careful though because NDs call themselves "physicians" as well who supposedly graduated medical school.
I know they may be able to call themselves "doctors" since they technically hold a doctorate degree, but is it legal to call themselves "physicians"?
 

NurWollen

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I think sometimes people use the term "medical doctor" in the same sentence as "docor of osteopathy" or "osteopath" (thus giving the impression that DOs aren't medical doctors) because they mistakenly think the initials MD stand for "Medical Doctor." They actually stand for "Medicinae Doctor" which is Latin for "Doctor of Medicine."

Some will say this is minutae but there is a reason I bring this up. Medical doctor is a description of someone's profession. When I finish school, get licensed or whatever, as a DO, I will be a medical doctor. I will not, however, be a holder of the degree "Doctor of Medicine" AKA Medicinae Doctor AKA MD.
 
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nolite te bastardes carborundorum
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I know they may be able to call themselves "doctors" since they technically hold a doctorate degree, but is it legal to call themselves "physicians"?
Pretty sure the AMA only considers MDs and DOs physicians, for what it's worth
 

NurWollen

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Pretty sure the AMA only considers MDs and DOs physicians, for what it's worth
Seems reasonable. I'd probably be generous and give it to podiatrists too since their training is so very similar to ours. Much more so than that of dentists, optometrists, DPTs, etc. Then again they don't have "unrestricted licenses" to practice medicine, so if that is the measure of someone's physicianhood I could see it going both ways.
 

Ibn Alnafis MD

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I think sometimes people use the term "medical doctor" in the same sentence as "docor of osteopathy" or "osteopath" (thus giving the impression that DOs aren't medical doctors) because they mistakenly think the initials MD stand for "Medical Doctor." They actually stand for "Medicinae Doctor" which is Latin for "Doctor of Medicine."

Some will say this is minutae but there is a reason I bring this up. Medical doctor is a description of someone's profession. When I finish school, get licensed or whatever, as a DO, I will be a medical doctor. I will not, however, be a holder of the degree "Doctor of Medicine" AKA Medicinae Doctor AKA MD.
Yes, medical doctor is the term given to anyone who went to medical school and practices medicine, be it MD/DO/MBBS/MBBCh etc.

However, the DO also implies that one has graduated from an osteopathic medical school and can practice Osteopathy. Therefore, when you visit many universities websites and view the residents, you'll notice that everyone is given the MD initials (including those who did a bachelor's degree in medicine overseas) except for DO's.
 

Ibn Alnafis MD

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Just out of curiosity, would you have preferred that your badge said D.O. instead? I know that you are an anesthesiologist and perhaps couldn't care less about what you learned in your OMM courses, but don't you feel you are entitled to be credited for your "extra" efforts?
 

NurWollen

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Just out of curiosity, would you have preferred that your badge said D.O. instead? I know that you are an anesthesiologist and perhaps couldn't care less about what you learned in your OMM courses, but don't you feel you are entitled to be credited for your "extra" efforts?
Nurses would say his initials should be MDA lol.
 

cliquesh

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Just out of curiosity, would you have preferred that your badge said D.O. instead? I know that you are an anesthesiologist and perhaps couldn't care less about what you learned in your OMM courses, but don't you feel you are entitled to be credited for your "extra" efforts?
I'm indifferent. No one I work with really knows what a DO is, and they surely do not know what OMM is.
 
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Yes, medical doctor is the term given to anyone who went to medical school and practices medicine, be it MD/DO/MBBS/MBBCh etc.

However, the DO also implies that one has graduated from an osteopathic medical school and can practice Osteopathy. Therefore, when you visit many universities websites and view the residents, you'll notice that everyone is given the MD initials (including those who did a bachelor's degree in medicine overseas) except for DO's.
I work at a major hospital and while an osteopathic physician's nametag says "D.O.," everything in the computer EHR says MD. The hospital website does differentiate between MD, MBBS, DO.
 

cabinbuilder

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I actually had no idea that some DOs call themselves osteopaths.

And that's totally fair, you are probably right.
A lot of times you really don't have a choice. The clinic I am working at currently when you look at the schedule, after the ND is say Naturopath, after my name it says Osteopath, after the MD it says doctor. I have no control of how the IT folks set up the system. :shrug:
 

NurWollen

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A lot of times you really don't have a choice. The clinic I am working at currently when you look at the schedule, after the ND is say Naturopath, after my name it says Osteopath, after the MD it says doctor. I have no control of how the IT folks set up the system. :shrug:
Well that is annoying.
 

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A lot of times you really don't have a choice. The clinic I am working at currently when you look at the schedule, after the ND is say Naturopath, after my name it says Osteopath, after the MD it says doctor. I have no control of how the IT folks set up the system. :shrug:
this is unacceptable. seriously
 
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cabinbuilder

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this is unacceptable. seriously
Comes down to picking your battles. The patient's don't see it. It's just how the scheduler's and the providers, and the staff see it.
 
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SurgeDO

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medicine is arguably the most biased profession of the time.

study hard, become a competent physician, and rise above the bull ****.
 

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A lot of times you really don't have a choice. The clinic I am working at currently when you look at the schedule, after the ND is say Naturopath, after my name it says Osteopath, after the MD it says doctor. I have no control of how the IT folks set up the system. :shrug:
To me that is actually disrespectful. DO/MD should always be written as physician.
 

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Beyond the omitting the Bachelor's degree, I don't really see this as biased. Not too long ago, the AOA (and everyone) called DOs osteopaths. You still hear it from the older DOs out of habit. While I agree that Osteopathic physician is more accurate, it is a relatively recent modification, mainly used to differentiate US DOs from Osteopaths who are not physicians in other countries.

I personally would find Cabinbuilder's experience offensive, even if it doesn't get seen by patients, because everyone in that line (IT, billers, insurance companies, etc) are seeing it, and its perpetuating an idea at least amongst them that DOs aren't "real doctors" like MDs. Now what I would do to change it would probably depend on how big the practice is, how much I valued the job, etc. If it was a big university hospital, I'd make it a point to change it, but with a 5 person outpatient practice, I might not care as much.
 

NurWollen

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Beyond the omitting the Bachelor's degree, I don't really see this as biased. Not too long ago, the AOA (and everyone) called DOs osteopaths. You still hear it from the older DOs out of habit. While I agree that Osteopathic physician is more accurate, it is a relatively recent modification, mainly used to differentiate US DOs from Osteopaths who are not physicians in other countries.

I personally would find Cabinbuilder's experience offensive, even if it doesn't get seen by patients, because everyone in that line (IT, billers, insurance companies, etc) are seeing it, and its perpetuating an idea at least amongst them that DOs aren't "real doctors" like MDs. Now what I would do to change it would probably depend on how big the practice is, how much I valued the job, etc. If it was a big university hospital, I'd make it a point to change it, but with a 5 person outpatient practice, I might not care as much.
Might make it awkward when the ND decides to join your cause.
 
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Does every state confer the M.D. degree to physicians who have the MBBS degree? Just out of curiosity!
 

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A lot of times you really don't have a choice. The clinic I am working at currently when you look at the schedule, after the ND is say Naturopath, after my name it says Osteopath, after the MD it says doctor. I have no control of how the IT folks set up the system. :shrug:
This made me furious reading it. Like somebody mentioned before MD really stands for Doctor of Medicine, not "Medical Doctor". All DO's are medical doctors, but they are Doctors of Osteopathic medicine.
 

TheWeeIceMan

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I have a hard time believing that this was an intentional slight.
 

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A lot of times you really don't have a choice. The clinic I am working at currently when you look at the schedule, after the ND is say Naturopath, after my name it says Osteopath, after the MD it says doctor. I have no control of how the IT folks set up the system. :shrug:
 
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darklabel

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Does every state confer the M.D. degree to physicians who have the MBBS degree? Just out of curiosity!
Nope, depends what school you went to. For instance, coming from SGU, all 50 states consider it an MD as long as you match into a residency. Otherwise it is an entirely useless degree.
 

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It's written the way it is because most people don't know that DOs are medical doctors. So to drive home that point Consumer Reports simply says, "practice as medical doctors do" to communicate that they are effectively the same. DOs are described in terms of an MD because that's the classic gold standard, and the one with which most people are familiar. There's nothing biased about it.