pinkpuppy9

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Sounds like she deserved it. The school's concern was that she would hide other mistakes or shortcomings. As a doctor, you need to be able to own up to mistakes. they happen, everyone is human (except maybe some of you guys :sneaky:). Covering up aggressive behavior (and in a breed that kind of has a reputation) is stupid and dangerous.
 

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That's a very sad story all around... Sounds like she had her head in the sand in regards to her dogs aggression. Unfortunately, due to her lack of responsibility, a dog lost his life and she lost her career. I think the Cornell is well within their rights and I agree with their course of action. More than anything, I am incredibly angry with the student. She failed that dog.
 
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Innerspeaker

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She was in denial that her sweet, little baby is a danger to other people and she probably didn't want him "humiliated" by the additional restraint (or something). I think Cornell had every right to do what they did.
 

LetItSnow

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Most clients are not veterinary professionals. If the facts of the case are true that she knew of the dog's aggression, didn't reveal it, and put a fellow professional at risk - then yes, she should have been dismissed. I always reserve some doubt about a newspaper article, though. The media are not reliable sources.

You cannot dick around with aggressive animals. Ever. You will see thousands in your career - all it takes is one to rip your face off.
 
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Most clients are not veterinary professionals. If the facts of the case are true that she knew of the dog's aggression, didn't reveal it, and put a fellow professional at risk - then yes, she should have been dismissed. I always reserve some doubt about a newspaper article, though. The media are not reliable sources.

You cannot dick around with aggressive animals. Ever. You will see thousands in your career - all it takes is one to rip your face off.
Yeah that's true. I can't help but wonder is she assumed/expected the staff to be able to handle the dog. I'm not saying that's right, and I'm not saying the bite was anyone's fault, but I've run into a few people who have the whole "What do you mean you can't adequately restrain my chow?"
 

dyachei

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Yeah that's true. I can't help but wonder is she assumed/expected the staff to be able to handle the dog. I'm not saying that's right, and I'm not saying the bite was anyone's fault, but I've run into a few people who have the whole "What do you mean you can't adequately restrain my chow?"
yeah, but as a student, if you know there is an issue, you warn other vet professionals. Whether or not you think you need to. That's the difference between being responsible and not
 

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Wonder what VA-MD's response will be, seeing as she has a degree from there now....
 

orca2011

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Most clients are not veterinary professionals. If the facts of the case are true that she knew of the dog's aggression, didn't reveal it, and put a fellow professional at risk - then yes, she should have been dismissed. I always reserve some doubt about a newspaper article, though. The media are not reliable sources.

You cannot dick around with aggressive animals. Ever. You will see thousands in your career - all it takes is one to rip your face off.
Seriously to the bolded part. I recently saw someone post a comment in my dog's rescue group about how they're looking for a new vet because their vet had an outburst (based on her description, the vet might have handled the situation poorly, but it's also only one side of the story) about her joking around that her dog bites them all the time. She made the point to mention that her dog has had all it's teeth removed, which might make the bite less traumatic, but I couldn't help but comment that biting is NEVER something to joke about.
 

LetItSnow

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Wonder what VA-MD's response will be, seeing as she has a degree from there now....
Wherever she has a degree from, she presumably didn't violate their honor code .... so I imagine nothing will be done. Or should be done. That's life. Hopefully she learned from the experience.

Seriously to the bolded part. I recently saw someone post a comment in my dog's rescue group about how they're looking for a new vet because their vet had an outburst (based on her description, the vet might have handled the situation poorly, but it's also only one side of the story) about her joking around that her dog bites them all the time. She made the point to mention that her dog has had all it's teeth removed, which might make the bite less traumatic, but I couldn't help but comment that biting is NEVER something to joke about.
Yep. Not ok to joke about. I love the classic owner line: "My dog won't bite anyone." Ok, great. But all it takes with the thousands of dogs we see is for exactly one owner to be wrong. The owner feels like the vet doesn't trust them, but the vet knows that a) owners are biased, and b) people aren't perfect, and if the owner is wrong it can wreck a career.

I just don't mess around with it. I used to be a bit more cavalier about taking risks. And nothing really specific happened. I didn't get bit, and I didn't let someone else get bit. But somewhere along the way I just sobered up to the fact that one mistake can change a life. If I have even a sneaking suspicion a dog might bite, I muzzle them. If that's not enough, I sedate them. If the owner won't authorize sedation, they don't get examined and/or treated. If the owners don't like that - tough - I don't apologize for it. My health and the health of my staff members trump their animal's health care.
 

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Wherever she has a degree from, she presumably didn't violate their honor code .... so I imagine nothing will be done. Or should be done. That's life. Hopefully she learned from the experience.

.
I'm thinking more along the angle of how she was admitted to another vet school when she was expelled from one, and was sued. All of that information has to go on the application. I guess I'm just one that thinks that as a veterinary community, if one vet school expels you for reasons like the above, all of them should recognize the potential problem with regards to that student. Maybe I just don't see it as a violation of a school's honor code, I see it as breaking an ethical veterinary code that encompasses the community as a whole.

Hopefully she learned from it. The article sure makes it sound like she didn't.
 

LetItSnow

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I'm thinking more along the angle of how she was admitted to another vet school when she was expelled from one, and was sued. All of that information has to go on the application. I guess I'm just one that thinks that as a veterinary community, if one vet school expells you for reasons like the above, all of them should recognize the potential problem with regards to that student. Maybe I just don't see it as a violation of a school's honor code, I see it as breaking a ethical veterinary code that encompasses the community as a whole.

Hopefully she learned from it. The article sure makes it sound like she didn't.
Oh, I totally agree with everything you said. I'm surprised that she was accepted somewhere else - you'd think the other school would say "Woah, this is sketch, we don't want to go anywhere near it." I suppose if she concealed the reason for expulsion that would be actionable. But presumably the school knew the history and accepted her anyway. Kinda calls into question (for me) their judgment, but ...... such is life.
 

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She wasn't expelled because of the dog bite (or the dog's history of biting), she was expelled because she violated the Honor Code, and then she didn't adhere to the requirements of her provisional reinstatement. The copy of the decision (including a case summary) is linked in the NY Times article.

I am also surprised she was admitted somewhere else, but it was the Antigua vet school, less than 2 years before they shut down, so they might not have been too picky at the time. She transferred to and graduated from West Virginia, though.
 

orca2011

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Yep. Not ok to joke about. I love the classic owner line: "My dog won't bite anyone." Ok, great. But all it takes with the thousands of dogs we see is for exactly one owner to be wrong. The owner feels like the vet doesn't trust them, but the vet knows that a) owners are biased, and b) people aren't perfect, and if the owner is wrong it can wreck a career.

I just don't mess around with it. I used to be a bit more cavalier about taking risks. And nothing really specific happened. I didn't get bit, and I didn't let someone else get bit. But somewhere along the way I just sobered up to the fact that one mistake can change a life. If I have even a sneaking suspicion a dog might bite, I muzzle them. If that's not enough, I sedate them. If the owner won't authorize sedation, they don't get examined and/or treated. If the owners don't like that - tough - I don't apologize for it. My health and the health of my staff members trump their animal's health care.
That's exactly what I said. My safety is essentially more important than any bruised feelings in these types of situations.
 
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pinkpuppy9

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Wherever she has a degree from, she presumably didn't violate their honor code .... so I imagine nothing will be done. Or should be done. That's life. Hopefully she learned from the experience.



Yep. Not ok to joke about. I love the classic owner line: "My dog won't bite anyone." Ok, great. But all it takes with the thousands of dogs we see is for exactly one owner to be wrong. The owner feels like the vet doesn't trust them, but the vet knows that a) owners are biased, and b) people aren't perfect, and if the owner is wrong it can wreck a career.

I just don't mess around with it. I used to be a bit more cavalier about taking risks. And nothing really specific happened. I didn't get bit, and I didn't let someone else get bit. But somewhere along the way I just sobered up to the fact that one mistake can change a life. If I have even a sneaking suspicion a dog might bite, I muzzle them. If that's not enough, I sedate them. If the owner won't authorize sedation, they don't get examined and/or treated. If the owners don't like that - tough - I don't apologize for it. My health and the health of my staff members trump their animal's health care.
Especially when all you need to lose your career is one gnarly bite to the hand...
She wasn't expelled because of the dog bite (or the dog's history of biting), she was expelled because she violated the Honor Code, and then she didn't adhere to the requirements of her provisional reinstatement. The copy of the decision (including a case summary) is linked in the NY Times article.

I am also surprised she was admitted somewhere else, but it was the Antigua vet school, less than 2 years before they shut down, so they might not have been too picky at the time. She transferred to and graduated from West Virginia, though.
Was that school ever AVMA accredited?
 

CalliopeDVM

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Was that school ever AVMA accredited?
Nope; I think it was only around for less than 2 years.

Ah..........I was mistaken in my earlier post -- I thought it opened in 2004 and closed at the end of 2011, but in fact the vet school opened in 2009 (the med school opened in 2004, and is still open). "AUA had a partnership in place with Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine to provide clinical training to its students. This arrangement provided for an exclusive partnership that would have allowed veterinary students to transfer directly to Virginia Tech and receive a degree from the U.S.-based institution." So I guess it made sense that that's where her vet degree is from.
 
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pinkpuppy9

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Nope; I think it was only around for less than 2 years.

Ah..........I was mistaken in my earlier post -- I thought it opened in 2004 and closed at the end of 2011, but in fact the vet school opened in 2009 (the med school opened in 2004, and is still open). "AUA had a partnership in place with Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine to provide clinical training to its students. This arrangement provided for an exclusive partnership that would have allowed veterinary students to transfer directly to Virginia Tech and receive a degree from the U.S.-based institution." So I guess it made sense that that's where her vet degree is from.
That kind of confuses me..why would an AVMA accredited school accept clinical year students from a non-AVMA school, then give them a degree? I thought the whole thing with the Caribbean schools was that US institutions only take their students because those schools are AVMA and that partnership was worked out.
 

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That kind of confuses me..why would an AVMA accredited school accept clinical year students from a non-AVMA school, then give them a degree? I thought the whole thing with the Caribbean schools was that US institutions only take their students because those schools are AVMA and that partnership was worked out.
Until what....4 years ago? Ross and SGU were not accredited by the AVMA, but students would do their clinical years in the states.
 
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""[This partnership] has many purposes," Schurig says. "We all know we have a [veterinarian] shortage that will be worse in the future. By admitting a few more students, we will be able to start graduating a larger class, in theory, within a couple of years. " :eyebrow:

I figured money was a big motivator-they mention using the new students to replace the tuition of those that left the Virginia program.
Until what....4 years ago? Ross and SGU were not accredited by the AVMA, but students would do their clinical years in the states.
Referring back to the link Calliope just posted, I just don't understand how the AVMA sits back and just watches. It sounds like they talked to Antigua a little bit....but they did say they'd interfere if they felt it was going to be an issue. That school only lasted two years, so it may not have been enough time to really look at what its curriculum was like. It just seems weird to get admitted/attend a non-AVMA school, then because that school worked out a deal, you get to finish at an AVMA school and get a degree with accreditation backing it
 

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""[This partnership] has many purposes," Schurig says. "We all know we have a [veterinarian] shortage that will be worse in the future. By admitting a few more students, we will be able to start graduating a larger class, in theory, within a couple of years. " :eyebrow:

I figured money was a big motivator-they mention using the new students to replace the tuition of those that left the Virginia program.

Referring back to the link Calliope just posted, I just don't understand how the AVMA sits back and just watches. It sounds like they talked to Antigua a little bit....but they did say they'd interfere if they felt it was going to be an issue. That school only lasted two years, so it may not have been enough time to really look at what its curriculum was like. It just seems weird to get admitted/attend a non-AVMA school, then because that school worked out a deal, you get to finish at an AVMA school and get a degree with accreditation backing it
That's just how it used to be. The island schools don't have the hospitals/case load needed. That's why Ross and SGU fought so hard for so long to get accredited. The students at those schools did not get a degree from their clinical year school, and I believe still had to sit for PAVE/ECVFG, not the NAVLE.
 
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That's just how it used to be. The island schools don't have the hospitals/case load needed. That's why Ross and SGU fought so hard for so long to get accredited. The students at those schools did not get a degree from their clinical year school, and I believe still had to sit for PAVE/ECVFG, not the NAVLE.
I know that before they were accredited, Ross/SGU students didn't get degrees from the schools they did clinicals at. That's why it seems so strange that VMRCVM would give degrees to students in essentially the same position. I don't think it says if they had to take the NAVLE or not, though
 

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I know that before they were accredited, Ross/SGU students didn't get degrees from the schools they did clinicals at. That's why it seems so strange that VMRCVM would give degrees to students in essentially the same position. I don't think it says if they had to take the NAVLE or not, though
They still don't get degrees from their clinical year schools.

And clearly VA-MD realized something, seeing as that partnership and program no longer exist.
 
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They still don't get degrees from their clinical year schools.

And clearly VA-MD realized something, seeing as that partnership and program no longer exist.
Yes, that's my point-The AVMA essentially let a small, brand spankin' new school produce students who received degrees with their backing, even though their didactic years were done at an unaccredited school. It just seems so shady, you'd think they would have investigated into it a bit more. I wonder what would have happened if the school didn't close...it sounds like current students were transferred to VMRCVM, so it doesn't sound like that relationship was necessarily terminated.
 

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Just to chime in here: there's a student currently suing my school (and has been for a few years) for 100% completely bogus reasons. He's a spoiled child that got upset he didn't get a passing grade for classes he didn't do any work in... I seriously doubt he'll win his case, especially considering the extent he slanders the school on Facebook and how much he talks about the case. A lot of us have discussed that he'll have an extremely hard time getting into another vet school because his four years at our school (during which he never made it past second year) are supposed to be disclosed on VMCAS.
 

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Yeah that's true. I can't help but wonder is she assumed/expected the staff to be able to handle the dog. I'm not saying that's right, and I'm not saying the bite was anyone's fault, but I've run into a few people who have the whole "What do you mean you can't adequately restrain my chow?"
i was always amazed in school at the number of truly horrifically aggressive patients we had. the school even had a written policy in place saying that they would accept nothing aggressive, and they ignored it all the time.
That's just how it used to be. The island schools don't have the hospitals/case load needed. That's why Ross and SGU fought so hard for so long to get accredited. The students at those schools did not get a degree from their clinical year school, and I believe still had to sit for PAVE/ECVFG, not the NAVLE.
yes up until 2011, those students still took PAVE/ECVFG
They still don't get degrees from their clinical year schools.

And clearly VA-MD realized something, seeing as that partnership and program no longer exist.
actually, AUA was bought by another group back in 2011 who realized how very unprofitable the vet school was and they dumped it like a smelly sock because they didnt want to deal with building that program that was going to cost them significant amounts of funding and never make them much money. they didn't have a ton of kids in their program at the time because it was only 2 years old, but a couple went to VMRCVM upon closure, and a majority came to SGU and Ross. all of these students were forced to add at least one more semester to their years of vet school because of this decision :-/ the people who transferred to SGU were all awesome though.
 

jmo1012

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Yes, that's my point-The AVMA essentially let a small, brand spankin' new school produce students who received degrees with their backing, even though their didactic years were done at an unaccredited school. It just seems so shady, you'd think they would have investigated into it a bit more. I wonder what would have happened if the school didn't close...it sounds like current students were transferred to VMRCVM, so it doesn't sound like that relationship was necessarily terminated.
i think this is less shady than you think - VMRCVM had the right to decline to take any students transferring into their 3rd year program, so thats really no different than a Ross or SGU student transferring into a state school. i dont think more than a handful of students actually got that far, because the program was only open for 2 years. a majority of the students were transferred to SGU and a few to Ross when the program dissolved.

this was all going on while i was an undergrad at VT. i was heavily involved in the pre-vet program, and can tell you that VMRCVM had a heavy hand in what happened curriculum-wise at AUA, and they had the right to turn down any and all students they felt were not up to par with their program and students. i looked very closely at applying to this school when i applied back in the day because of this partnership, but ultimately decided not to hedge my bets on something that wasnt guaranteed and such a young program. thankfully i didnt, because they closed during my first semester!
 

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Wherever she has a degree from, she presumably didn't violate their honor code .... so I imagine nothing will be done. Or should be done. That's life. Hopefully she learned from the experience.



Yep. Not ok to joke about. I love the classic owner line: "My dog won't bite anyone." Ok, great. But all it takes with the thousands of dogs we see is for exactly one owner to be wrong. The owner feels like the vet doesn't trust them, but the vet knows that a) owners are biased, and b) people aren't perfect, and if the owner is wrong it can wreck a career.

I just don't mess around with it. I used to be a bit more cavalier about taking risks. And nothing really specific happened. I didn't get bit, and I didn't let someone else get bit. But somewhere along the way I just sobered up to the fact that one mistake can change a life. If I have even a sneaking suspicion a dog might bite, I muzzle them. If that's not enough, I sedate them. If the owner won't authorize sedation, they don't get examined and/or treated. If the owners don't like that - tough - I don't apologize for it. My health and the health of my staff members trump their animal's health care.
With you there. When I was working before vet school, pretty sure there was a client asked not to come back because they weren't compliant with sedating their dog for visits; you could not even touch that dog without it trying to maul you.

I wish those people would realize that sometimes it just comes down to animals do what they do. Training and socialization and whatever else, animals have different backgrounds and the vet is a stressful place that elicits different responses. Being forthcoming won't get you judged, but letting it be found out the hard way might. The people who laugh off their animal's aggressive behavior (whether at the vet, at home, or both) unsettle me though; too much potential for something to eventually go very wrong.


Just to chime in here: there's a student currently suing my school (and has been for a few years) for 100% completely bogus reasons. He's a spoiled child that got upset he didn't get a passing grade for classes he didn't do any work in... I seriously doubt he'll win his case, especially considering the extent he slanders the school on Facebook and how much he talks about the case. A lot of us have discussed that he'll have an extremely hard time getting into another vet school because his four years at our school (during which he never made it past second year) are supposed to be disclosed on VMCAS.
I've heard of similar things at other schools. Whether the rumors I'd heard were just bogus threats or went further I can't say, but it's all a bit ridiculous. You know what you signed up for, do it or don't.
 
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i think this is less shady than you think - VMRCVM had the right to decline to take any students transferring into their 3rd year program, so thats really no different than a Ross or SGU student transferring into a state school. i dont think more than a handful of students actually got that far, because the program was only open for 2 years. a majority of the students were transferred to SGU and a few to Ross when the program dissolved.

this was all going on while i was an undergrad at VT. i was heavily involved in the pre-vet program, and can tell you that VMRCVM had a heavy hand in what happened curriculum-wise at AUA, and they had the right to turn down any and all students they felt were not up to par with their program and students. i looked very closely at applying to this school when i applied back in the day because of this partnership, but ultimately decided not to hedge my bets on something that wasnt guaranteed and such a young program. thankfully i didnt, because they closed during my first semester!
Oh that makes a bit more sense. The news article mentions they take a test, but it definitely makes it seem like the transfer to VMRCVM was an automatic thing
 
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Just to chime in here: there's a student currently suing my school (and has been for a few years) for 100% completely bogus reasons. He's a spoiled child that got upset he didn't get a passing grade for classes he didn't do any work in... I seriously doubt he'll win his case, especially considering the extent he slanders the school on Facebook and how much he talks about the case. A lot of us have discussed that he'll have an extremely hard time getting into another vet school because his four years at our school (during which he never made it past second year) are supposed to be disclosed on VMCAS.
Please to clarify: Is this student repeating years multiple times to make him have been there for 4 years? And what exactly do you mean "disclosed on VMCAS?"

I agree with you-generally, the more you publicly talk about a case, the less chance you have of winning. Just makes you look bad. See here: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/03/03/man-loses-80000-legal-settlement-after-daughter-facebook-post-violates/ You can lose even after you've won!
 

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Oh that makes a bit more sense. The news article mentions they take a test, but it definitely makes it seem like the transfer to VMRCVM was an automatic thing
oh no it was definitely not an automatic thing. it seemed fairly uncommon actually, and it wasnt really made clear what would happen to a student that was unable to transfer...but again, the students that did transfer were likely right on course with the vmrcvm curriculum at the time, becuase vmrcvm had a huge hand in designing the AUA program
 

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Please to clarify: Is this student repeating years multiple times to make him have been there for 4 years? And what exactly do you mean "disclosed on VMCAS?"

I agree with you-generally, the more you publicly talk about a case, the less chance you have of winning. Just makes you look bad. See here: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/03/03/man-loses-80000-legal-settlement-after-daughter-facebook-post-violates/ You can lose even after you've won!
Full disclaimer, just want to state that I don't know ALL the details. I believe he made it through years 1 and 2 and then essentially repeated part of all of second year twice.

Don't you have to disclose educational history on VMCAS? Vet school would be educational history...
 
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Full disclaimer, just want to state that I don't know ALL the details. I believe he made it through years 1 and 2 and then essentially repeated part of all of second year twice.

Don't you have to disclose educational history on VMCAS? Vet school would be educational history...
Right, I think I misinterpreted what you were trying to say there. He doesn't necessarily have to say why he didn't complete on VMCAS, but I'm sure that would be an interview question. Not sure how he would go about discussing that on his personal/explanation statements.
 

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Right, I think I misinterpreted what you were trying to say there. He doesn't necessarily have to say why he didn't complete on VMCAS, but I'm sure that would be an interview question. Not sure how he would go about discussing that on his personal/explanation statements.
VMCAS, at least the years I've been applying, asks questions and requires explanations in situations involving any academic punishments, like dismissals, suspensions, etc. I would imagine that repeating a year is considered to be an academic punishment for poor performance since, at least with the schools I'm familiar with, repeating a year is typically accompanied by some kind of academic probation.
 
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pinkpuppy9

pinkpuppy9

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VMCAS, at least the years I've been applying, asks questions and requires explanations in situations involving any academic punishments, like dismissals, suspensions, etc. I would imagine that repeating a year is considered to be an academic punishment for poor performance since, at least with the schools I'm familiar with, repeating a year is typically accompanied by some kind of academic probation.
yeah I think that holds true still, or I imagine it would. I'm thinking that if he truly feels he was wrongfully dismissed/held back/whatever, that he won't exactly make himself look bad on an application. I feel like a few phone calls would be made to his old school, though, because it's a rather unique situation.
 

batsenecal

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Want to also chime in on the dog bite thing. I don't feel owners really understand how terrifying a dog can be. While I was working at the boarding facility, I made a mistake which resulted in an extremely aggressive dog attacked a Husky. The owner has told us her dog was like her friend's dog (friend referred her to us, so we knew the friend's dog). Needless to say, the aggression levels of the two dogs isn't even comparable. The resulting fight and struggle to get the two dogs separated was the second most terrifying moment of my life and I hadn't ever been afraid of a dog before. Thankfully the Husky only needed four stitches, but had it been a large breed with no fur or a small breed, the attacking dog would have killed the dog it was attacking. When we called the attacker's owner, she initially tried to deny the accusations, but that wasn't going to work. That dog was out of our kennel immediately.

Owners don't seem to realize that dogs can legitimately maim or kill someone. This owner made a dumb decision to not disclose the aggression. More over, at 60 years old, she's ruined her chances or a successful career to ride out her last few decades with, and the dog still ended up being killed. Had she owned up to the aggression, he could have been handled properly and might still be alive.
 

Okimo

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VMCAS, at least the years I've been applying, asks questions and requires explanations in situations involving any academic punishments, like dismissals, suspensions, etc. I would imagine that repeating a year is considered to be an academic punishment for poor performance since, at least with the schools I'm familiar with, repeating a year is typically accompanied by some kind of academic probation.
yeah I think that holds true still, or I imagine it would. I'm thinking that if he truly feels he was wrongfully dismissed/held back/whatever, that he won't exactly make himself look bad on an application. I feel like a few phone calls would be made to his old school, though, because it's a rather unique situation.
Yeah, so he was actually ultimately suspended and recently published on Facebook that he "won't be returning." Whether or not he was actually expelled or chose to leave, I have no idea. Regardless, the suspension has to be disclosed and I'd imagine seeing 4 years at a CVM with no DVM would provoke some questions from an ad com.
 

dyachei

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yeah I think that holds true still, or I imagine it would. I'm thinking that if he truly feels he was wrongfully dismissed/held back/whatever, that he won't exactly make himself look bad on an application. I feel like a few phone calls would be made to his old school, though, because it's a rather unique situation.
Doesn't really matter how you try to spin it. There would be an immediate red flag and a call to the other vet school. When they find out its for academic reasons, there isn't much recourse unless the school happens to be predatory. Then they may accept just for tuition.
 

CalliopeDVM

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This owner made a dumb decision to not disclose the aggression. More over, at 60 years old, she's ruined her chances or a successful career to ride out her last few decades with, and the dog still ended up being killed. Had she owned up to the aggression, he could have been handled properly and might still be alive.
I think it was the lawsuit that "ruined her chances" - if in fact they are ruined - rather than her expulsion from Cornell. While she may not work as a clinical vet, she is currently enrolled in a MPH program, which is really a different thing altogether. Still, if she hadn't sued, nothing would have been publicized and few people would have ever known.
 
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Jess Monster

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I really doubt things are ruined for her. It's likely that she'll get her MPH and find a cushy government job or military job that pays relatively well. A doctorate, a master's, and military experience (presumably a good record) is like the immediately hired trifecta for government service jobs. Honestly, she'll probably be the top candidate for whatever job she applies to and government HR likely won't even bat an eye at her current legal troubles which are not criminal legal troubles.
 
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CalliopeDVM

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Yeah, this is a very old article. Word on the street is we are no longer taking Carib students after this year.

Regardless of the politics behind it, it kind of sucks for the students. We mostly had Ross kids and they were always fantastic.
That does suck for the Caribbean students....I have met several great grads from Ross. I know it was an old article, but it was specifically about the relationship with that particular school (which hasn't been around for over 5 years now).