pushkin

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Now, I haven't completely made up my mind, but I am really leaning towards going to Cornell next year! I was just wondering, what percentage of students live in the on-campus dorms or apartments? I am somewhat of a non-traditional student (age 32), and I although I know I would have a great time and get along with everyone in the dorm, I think I would prefer to live in my own apartment, due to having a large array of kitchen paraphenalia. New York real estate being what it is, I am hoping to get an early start looking for a place.

Does anyone live off campus? If so, where? Does everyone rent, or do some people buy a place during med school? How far away can you live and still be within easy commuting distance, would you say? Assuming I stayed on the East Side of Manhattan, how far uptown or downtown do you think I could look and be within a reasonable distance from the school? By the way, I'm coming from the Midwest but I've previously lived in NYC. I don't really remember all that much about the different neighborhoods right now though.

And just in case I do end up choosing the dorm, how long before school starts do they let you move in?

Any advice or personal anecdotes that people would like to share will be much appreciated! Thanks. :)
 

Habari

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Does anyone live off campus? If so, where? Does everyone rent, or do some people buy a place during med school? How far away can you live and still be within easy commuting distance, would you say? Assuming I stayed on the East Side of Manhattan, how far uptown or downtown do you think I could look and be within a reasonable distance from the school? By the way, I'm coming from the Midwest but I've previously lived in NYC. I don't really remember all that much about the different neighborhoods right now though.
pushkin,
in the second year class, i'd say that about 25% of the people live outside of the cornell subsidized housing (680/month in the more typical apartment-style lasdon apartments that are available to 2nd through 4th years, as opposed to the 1st year ~460/month dorm setup). for those living "off campus", most live in apartments around 78th (cornell is at 69th), both in cornell-owned apartments and independently-found apartments. some people commute from brooklyn and queens (on the 6 or F trains, respectively - though i would personally find this to be a bit far).

apartment rents become quite afforable once you go above 95 on the east side (550/month wouldn't be too hard -- a recent family members experience) and you can get some great places if you are willing to pay more. i would keep within 30 blocks in any direction for convenience-sake

proximity to the school becomes more desirable during 3rd year, though you will end up spending a substantial amount of time in the bronx, queens and/or brooklyn (there are about 10 affiliate hospitals), though you will have to spend about half of your time at NYH. so if you don't mind a bit of a commute, don't limit yourself to the upper east side-ish neighborhoods - while this is a "nice" and "quiet" neighborhood with great food options and close to central park/museum mile, it isn't the most happening of places. realize that in your first two years you'll have more time than you'll know what to do with, considering that class ends at 1pm, so take advantage of the city.

buying an apartment would be a great idea, but i haven't looked into it because the prices are out of my range, to put it lightly (~300k for a 1 bedroom, 400k and up for larger spaces, depending on the neighborhood in manhattan).
 
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pushkin

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Thanks Habari!

A few questions based on what you said:

1. Can 2nd year students move back into cornell subsidized housing if they lived off campus during 1st year?

2. Is info available from the school about those Cornell owned apartments around 78th St.?

I would love to find something in the Village or anywhere downtown, really. (I just cannot wait to live in New York again, which is why I'm already posting about it here!) Some of the apartments for rent or sale around or above 96th street seem like they'd be more affordable though. It would be great to own a place but I'm really only starting to investigate. Pretty expensive!

By the way, it looks like you are MD-PhD? Do you happen know if incoming students at Cornell ever do summer research before starting MS1? I'm only regular MD, but I'm interested in coming to New York early and working on some kind of project. I posted about this a couple days ago under "research during summer before starting med school" or something like that. Oh well, I can probably live without having such a busy summer, but it was just something I was interested in.

Well, thanks again! Hope I'm not plaguing you with too many questions. ;-)
 

stinkycheese

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Habari said:
apartment rents become quite afforable once you go above 95 on the east side (550/month wouldn't be too hard -- a recent family members experience)
:laugh: $550 a month for an apartment in Manhattan? I must be misunderstanding you.
 

Habari

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. Can 2nd year students move back into cornell subsidized housing if they lived off campus during 1st year?
yep.

2. Is info available from the school about those Cornell owned apartments around 78th St.?
yep: http://www.med.cornell.edu/housing/building/442_444.html?name1=77th+Street+Residences&type1=2Active

there is also this option: http://www.med.cornell.edu/housing/building/southtown.html?name1=Southtown+-+Roosevelt+Island&type1=2Active

pricing info: http://www.med.cornell.edu/housing/building/rent.html?name1=Rent+Ranges&type1=2Active

I would love to find something in the Village or anywhere downtown, really. (I just cannot wait to live in New York again, which is why I'm already posting about it here!) Some of the apartments for rent or sale around or above 96th street seem like they'd be more affordable though. It would be great to own a place but I'm really only starting to investigate. Pretty expensive!
the village/chelsea is incredibly expensive on any most budgets. i recommend finding an i-banker to serve as a patron for your medical education.

By the way, it looks like you are MD-PhD? Do you happen know if incoming students at Cornell ever do summer research before starting MS1? I'm only regular MD, but I'm interested in coming to New York early and working on some kind of project. I posted about this a couple days ago under "research during summer before starting med school" or something like that. Oh well, I can probably live without having such a busy summer, but it was just something I was interested in.
hmm - i would contact dr. bruce ballard at student affairs to see if you can work something out. i would recommend just taking the time off.

$550 a month for an apartment in Manhattan? I must be misunderstanding you.
http://newyork.craigslist.org/cgi-bin/search?areaID=3&subAreaID=1&query=&cat=roo&minAsk=500&maxAsk=600

there are currently 158 apartments that fit that price range (500-600) in manhattan - quite possible. check craigslist.
 

stinkycheese

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Habari said:
http://newyork.craigslist.org/cgi-bin/search?areaID=3&subAreaID=1&query=&cat=roo&minAsk=500&maxAsk=600

there are currently 158 apartments that fit that price range (500-600) in manhattan - quite possible. check craigslist.
Not to nitpick, but there are 60 apartments in Manhattan that fit this description. The 158 number is for ALL of NY. And to nitpick even further, most of the ads are for sublets, shares, or those $1 fake ads designed to catch the eye. The number of actual apartments IN manhattan that are NOT shares available for < $600 is miniscule, and most of them are in crackhouse neighborhoods. I recognize that there are exceptions to this, but generally, these apartments don't offer the full kitchens, etc, that the OP seemed to desire. (OP said s/he didnt want to live in the student housing because s/he has a lot of kitchen stuff.) Many have shared baths. And most are in awful parts of the city. So in terms of a reasonable housing alternative to the dorms, under 550 is generally not going to cut it.
 

Habari

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And most are in awful parts of the city. So in terms of a reasonable housing alternative to the dorms, under 550 is generally not going to cut it.
your prerogative about the 'awful parts of the city' - you can choose where you want to wear your lilly whites. i referenced the craigslist "158" as proof of concept, and because i know people who have found housing in that price range (after scouring craigslist for days). agreed that 550 is a base price, and everyone will be a share, or a compromise from an idealized vision of independent living. also you should know that the apartment hunting scene in nyc is not for the thin skinned, especially if there is a deal to be had - you have to be both lucky and persistant. that's what you come to expect in the city - if this doesn't fit what you had in mind, well, then you know. i'm hardly leading you down the primrose path.
 

stinkycheese

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Habari said:
your prerogative about the 'awful parts of the city' - you can choose where you want to wear your lilly whites. i referenced the craigslist "168" as proof of concept, and because i know people who have found housing in that price range. agreed that 550 is a base price, and everyone will be a share, or a compromise from an idealized vision of independent living. that's what you come to expect in the city - if this doesn't fit what you had in mind, well, then you know. i'm hardly leading you down the primrose path.
:laugh: A little hostile, eh?
 
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pushkin

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Habari said:
the village/chelsea is incredibly expensive on any most budgets. i recommend finding an i-banker to serve as a patron for your medical education.
In I-banker, eh? I was thinking more along the lines of aquiring myself some *old* money before jumping into the Manhattan real estate scene. Especially for the upper east side! ;)

Now folks, Habari is right--the New York apartment hunt is only for the thick skinned. And this is part of my reason for wanting to move to New York! When you live in one of the wimpier parts of the country, say the midwest just for example, all those great shark-like qualities that you need to survive in NYC just go by the wayside. I can't wait to sharpen my teeth again on this upcoming venture of finding an apartment in Manhattan!

Anyway, it was very nice of Habari to answer my questions, especially since several of them I could probably have answered myself if I'd looked a little more thoroughly through the Cornell website. I really appreciate the help! There are always exceptions to the rule in New York, and it's good to know about them. Don't worry, I know that for $500 it would be hard to find something not requiring extreme compromise. However, I think most people pondering moving to New York realize that living there is no cakewalk.

Thanks everyone!