Cornell v. BI?

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tombradystheman

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really stuck in terms of how to rank these two programs. wondering what people thought about how these two programs compare in terms of training and reputation? long term goal is fellowship in heme/onc and career in academics. cornell has sloan-kettering and BI has a weaker connection to dana-farber. liked them equally well and want to live my life in boston but think the opportunites and training at cornell might be better....
 

newenglandgal07

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If you want to go into heme onc I would definitely recommend the BI. It is affiliated with Harvard so you will have plenty of research opportunities. When it comes to heme/onc placement the BI residents do as well as the other Harvard hospitals' graduates. Last years class:6 went into heme onc, Dana Farber (2), Memorial Sloan Kettering, Brown, BIDMC, Columbia. I would say that's pretty darn good placement. I think I remember one of the residents saying they do get to rotate through the Farber.
 

Adcadet

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Residents at Beth Israel Deaconess certainly do rotate through the Dana Farber. The residents I spoke with thought this was a significant strength of the program.
 

Shah_Patel_PT

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If you want to go into heme onc I would definitely recommend the BI. It is affiliated with Harvard so you will have plenty of research opportunities. When it comes to heme/onc placement the BI residents do as well as the other Harvard hospitals' graduates. Last years class:6 went into heme onc, Dana Farber (2), Memorial Sloan Kettering, Brown, BIDMC, Columbia. I would say that's pretty darn good placement. I think I remember one of the residents saying they do get to rotate through the Farber.

Residents at SUNY downstate rotate at Sloan Kettering.
 

anonymous11

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Residents at Cornell also rotate through Sloan. I think for Hem/Onc both BID and Cornell are great options.
 

merlin17

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I really agree. Both are great for heme-onc. I would say if your ultimate goal is to be in Boston, BI might be a better choice since the Farber always has a preference for Boston residents and normally takes a handful from each of the Harvard programs. If you really want to be in NYC I'd say the opposite.

At BI, there are rotations in onc both at the Farber and BI itself. Plenty of opportunities to do research with faculty at both facilities. As a junior and senior you can also do electives at both sites.
 

mdcharak

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Of the New York programs, I would pick NYU over Cornell. NYU residents rotate through Sloan and the overall clinical training seemed better. The morning report at Cornell was a real let down -- only 2 of the 20 residents did any talking and the whole thing was run by the attendings. At NYU, it seemed like interns and residents worked harder but, in the end, wound up being more confident physicians. Plus the chairman of cornell is stepping down (the chair of penn is taking over). This may not have any affect on your future academic career, but any kind of change can potentially have destabilizing effects. So for all of these reasons I would be wary of Cornell. I didn't interview at BI so I can't comment on that, but I have heard good things. Also I think Boston is an easier city to live in than New York, but that's a personal preference.
 

phllystyl

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Of the New York programs, I would pick NYU over Cornell. NYU residents rotate through Sloan and the overall clinical training seemed better. The morning report at Cornell was a real let down -- only 2 of the 20 residents did any talking and the whole thing was run by the attendings. At NYU, it seemed like interns and residents worked harder but, in the end, wound up being more confident physicians. Plus the chairman of cornell is stepping down (the chair of penn is taking over). This may not have any affect on your future academic career, but any kind of change can potentially have destabilizing effects. So for all of these reasons I would be wary of Cornell. I didn't interview at BI so I can't comment on that, but I have heard good things. Also I think Boston is an easier city to live in than New York, but that's a personal preference.


Cornell residents spend a considerable amount of time at MSK. I know several interns who are already starting research projects there. Residents here consistently match quite well in Heme-Onc.

Being a cornell PGY1 and having worked there with NYU interns and residents, I saw no superiority in their level of clinical ability when compared to Cornell counterparts. I've said this before on SDN. And as far as how hard interns work, I think we work as hard as any program in NYC. This is a very frontloaded program.

With regards to Dr. Nachman's stepping down, he is an amazing physician and it is always a loss when someone like that retires. That being said, he and Dr. Pecker spent a massive amount of time choosing the new chair, and I trust their judgement in that regard. The negotiation of the new chair's contract is going to bring some changes to the program, all of which are considered positive per Dr. Pecker.

Finally, mdcharak, i support your decision to NOT come to NYP/Cornell. To everyone puttin together your rank lists, go where you felt is the best fit for you based on gut feeling, future goals, training, lifestyle, city, etc... whatever you feel is most important. mdcharak did not feel cornell, and I wish him the best of luck where ever he does end up training. Take care when reading posts on the interweb about programs based on a 1 day interview....
 

SNP

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really stuck in terms of how to rank these two programs. wondering what people thought about how these two programs compare in terms of training and reputation? long term goal is fellowship in heme/onc and career in academics. cornell has sloan-kettering and BI has a weaker connection to dana-farber. liked them equally well and want to live my life in boston but think the opportunites and training at cornell might be better....

Hi,
I'm a BIDMC resident. When you are done training here, you will be a very competent physician and able to handle any situation. I can tell you that the opportunities you have in oncology at BIDMC are impressive. You can rotate through both BMT and solid onc at DFCI as well as BIDMC. BIDMC is much smaller than DFCI yet leaders in the entire fields of Renal CC, Melanoma, Ovarian cancer, Breast Cancer are here. Further, benign heme and certain areas of basic science are strong here.

And the Onc matches for the current 3rd yrs were: DFCI(3), BIDMC(3), Penn, MDAnderson, Fox Chase, Stanford, Moffit.

Good luck. You're not going to go wrong with either.
 
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