Quantcast

coronary artery disease and valve disorder

Achieve USMLE Step PREP Success | Picmonic
This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

trgf

Full Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2010
Messages
83
Reaction score
0
What would be the connection between coronary artery disease and valvular disorders? I know that the valves do not have any blood supply, and as such trying to increase neutrophils would be useless in treating bacterial endocarditis.But so, wouldn't the same line of reasoning apply here?
 

jfgavina

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2011
Messages
555
Reaction score
25
The basic mechanism underlying coronary disease is ischemia, so we must think how this can damage valvular function. Valves are "operated" by papilary muscles without these they won't open or close. So, if you have infarction of an artery supplying a papillary muscle the valve stops normal function and you probably will have regurgitation.
 

medking

The time will come...
10+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2006
Messages
901
Reaction score
2
The basic mechanism underlying coronary disease is ischemia, so we must think how this can damage valvular function. Valves are "operated" by papilary muscles without these they won't open or close. So, if you have infarction of an artery supplying a papillary muscle the valve stops normal function and you probably will have regurgitation.

1. Aortic and Pulmonic valves aren't associated with papillary muscles.

2. Papillary muscles don't open and close valves. They prevent the valves from ballooning into the atria (prevent regurge)

I do agree with the part about ischemia--->necrosis--->regurge at the AV valves.

Perhaps with the Aortic valve, assuming the person has atherosclerosis elsewhere, that would lead to increased afterload and increased pressure of blood flowing across the valve. Maybe that will lead to faster wear and tear, leading to stenosis quicker?

I'm not sure.
 

ArcGurren

only one will survive
Joined
Aug 6, 2010
Messages
1,920
Reaction score
15
The basic mechanism underlying coronary disease is ischemia, so we must think how this can damage valvular function. Valves are "operated" by papilary muscles without these they won't open or close. So, if you have infarction of an artery supplying a papillary muscle the valve stops normal function and you probably will have regurgitation.

This :thumbup:

Patient comes to you post-MI with hypotension and dyspnea; you hear crackles in the lung and a pansystolic or midsystolic murmur at the apex. Probably an ischemic sequelae of the MI where the papillary muscle ruptured, causing mitral regurgitation.
 
Top