sylhet

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Apr 8, 2011
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Dr. Sattar in Pathoma said that we may find calcium oxalate stone in Crohn's Disease. But can we find calcium oxalate stone also in UC? Kindly exaplin.

Also he said we might find megacolon in UC. But can a patint also develop megacolon in Crohn?

Lastly, Since both the diseases inflam the mucosa, why do we get bloody diarrhea with UC? Cant any Crohn patient develop bloody diarrhea? if yes, please explain when n how??
 
Last edited:
Jun 11, 2012
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Dr. Sattar in Pathoma said that we may find calcium oxalate stone in Crohn's Disease. But can we find calcium oxalate stone also in UC? Kindly exaplin.

Also he said we might find megacolon in UC. But can a patint also develop megacolon in Crohn?

Lastly, Since both the diseases inflam the mucosa, why do we get bloody diarrhea with UC? Cant any Crohn patient develop bloody diarrhea? if yes, pleas sexplain when n how??
All of your questions are actually answered and sexplained by Sattar. If you rewatch and reread you will find out.
 
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sylhet

5+ Year Member
Apr 8, 2011
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Medical Student
All of your questions are actually answered and sexplained by Sattar. If you rewatch and reread you will find out.
not all of them, if u could reconsider my all questions above, that would be great. btw, thanks for your valuable (!) time , i appreciate ur prompt (!) replies.
 
Jun 11, 2012
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not all of them, if u could reconsider my all questions above, that would be great. btw, thanks for your valuable (!) time , i appreciate ur prompt (!) replies.
calcification- usually extracellular and a result of necrotic tissue. In UC tissue damage is submucosal- but not including the basement membrane- thus cell regeneration is possible. In Crohns it is the entire tissue- when dead tissue takes place and no regen (basement destroyed) dystrophic calcification occurs.

Any type of inflammatory dz can cause megacolon- due to inability of the peristaltic cells to function. It can happen in both. I suspect Sattar means mostly in UC. Furthermore, in Crohns damage is discontinuous while in UC it is continuous- albeit shorter area. So more of those cells damaged in that one area can limit peristalsis entirely in that area whereas in Crohns the discontinuous lesions allow some to function. In sincerity the exact mechanism is unknown

Same with diarrhea both have it. Just more in one. Think location. Crohns- entirity of the mouth-gut tract but more so in the ileum. UC-mostly in colon-easier to appear as blood-closer to end.
 
Jan 7, 2014
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Medical Student
Dr. Sattar in Pathoma said that we may find calcium oxalate stone in Crohn's Disease. But can we find calcium oxalate stone also in UC? Kindly exaplin.

Also he said we might find megacolon in UC. But can a patint also develop megacolon in Crohn?

Lastly, Since both the diseases inflam the mucosa, why do we get bloody diarrhea with UC? Cant any Crohn patient develop bloody diarrhea? if yes, please explain when n how??
Dr. Sattar in Pathoma said that we may find calcium oxalate stone in Crohn's Disease. But can we find calcium oxalate stone also in UC? Kindly exaplin.

Also he said we might find megacolon in UC. But can a patint also develop megacolon in Crohn?

Lastly, Since both the diseases inflam the mucosa, why do we get bloody diarrhea with UC? Cant any Crohn patient develop bloody diarrhea? if yes, please explain when n how??
The 1st question was not answered properly. Hence answer for the same.
Oxalate stones are due to excessive GI absorption of oxalate. Hyperoxaluria
occurs in patients with small bowel resection, inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn) and
other malabsorptive states. The increased intestinal fat binds dietary calcium,
which is then unavailable to bind oxalate as usual. Therefore, increased oxalate
absorption in large bowel (unabsorbed bile salts may aid this) occurs and
precipitates in the kidney. Increased oxalate can also occur in people who drink
large amounts of tea, coffee, beer, chocolate and ethylene glycol overdose.
 
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