Nov 5, 2010
12
0
Status
Here is the deal:
I'm a software engineer at Google, 6 years experience, MS in Computer Science (undergrad also in CS). GPA is around 3.5. A lot of current ECs mostly to do with education and technology for kids and adults as well. I'll be turning 33 at the time of my application. No MCAT yet. I plan on applying in 2012 (since I need to complete my chemistry requirements.) 50hrs shadowing a doctor.

The thing is that I am not a US citizen. Is it typical for schools to require that you be a resident of the state where you'd like to go to school if you have a green card? I saw this in the faq of a Texas school and wonder if its common:
"
If I am a foreign national, can I be considered for admission to the medical school?

Foreign nationals must be permanent residents of the United States and qualify for Texas residency to receive consideration for admission.
"

If that is indeed the case...do you think it's crazy to quit a great job to move to the state where you want to establish residency? And do you have to be a resident by the time you apply or when you matriculate?

Thank you for your thoughts and suggestions. This is my first post on the site though I've been lurking for a while.
 

TriagePreMed

Membership Revoked
Removed
Apr 28, 2010
6,216
32
Status
Just by reading that phrase it says the ability to qualify for Texas residency. A green card holder has the ability to qualify for Texas residency. It doesn't mean he or she must have it to be considered for admissions.
 

Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
10+ Year Member
Sep 4, 2006
32,666
12,352
The Other Side of the Portal
Every state has its own rules. In general, a permanent resident is considered on par with a US citizen during the application process. Some state schools do not accept you if you are not an in-state resident, and others limit non-state residents to only a few seats at the school. For example, Texas law requires that 90% of med school seats go to state residents. Establishing residency in some states is tricky and may require that you live there for noneducational purposes, own property, and/or be a resident for a year before submitting your application. Some require 5 years of residency. Others are very lenient. Be sure you know the exact rules for a given state.

Besides the residency issue, also be aware that you will be obliged to have a certain number of college credits from an accredited US or Candian school (typically 60-90 semester hours) before you will be considered. Did you get both your undergrad and grad degrees in the US? Then there's no problem.

What is your state of residency now?
 
Last edited:
OP
W
Nov 5, 2010
12
0
Status
Every state has its own rules. In general, a permanent resident is considered on par with a US citizen during the application process. Some state schools do not accept you if you are not an in-state resident, and others limit non-state residents to only a few seats at the school. For example, Texas law requires that 90% of med school seats go to state residents. Establishing residency in some states is tricky and may require that you live there for noneducational purposes, own property, and/or be a resident for a year before submitting your application. Some require 5 years of residency. Others are very lenient. Be sure you know the exact rules for a given state.
The school I am most interested in is a state school in Texas. I'll be sure to double check their requirements and speak to someone at the school. I would be very disappointed if I had to move just to be considered for admission but I guess crazier things have been done.

Besides the residency issue, also be aware that you will be obliged to have a certain number of college credits from an accredited US or Candian school (typically 60-90 semester hours) before you will be considered. Did you get both your undergrad and grad degrees in the US? Then there's no problem.
Yes, I received both degrees from accredited US schools.
What is you state of residency now?
I am a resident of New York.

Thank you for your answers. I have seen your posts and was hoping you'd give me your opinion.
 

Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
10+ Year Member
Sep 4, 2006
32,666
12,352
The Other Side of the Portal
New York is also a great state to have residency in, considering how many in-state med schools they have. What is the attraction in Texas, aside from the remarkably inexpensive med school tuition?
 
OP
W
Nov 5, 2010
12
0
Status
New York is also a great state to have residency in, considering how many in-state med schools they have.
I heard that being a resident of NY does not make *that* big of a difference since there is no 90-10 rule. But I guess what makes a difference is the number of schools (as you said).

What is the attraction in Texas, aside from the remarkably inexpensive med school tuition?
Well, I got my Masters at a state school in Texas and my time there was remarkable. It felt like home, the culture, the environment, the weather, the food, the people. Due to my job, I have lived in different places but none resembles Texas (well, this particular town). They happen to have a medical school so they immediately became my first choice. Its really more about the place than the school itself. (As far as a school, I think I'd be happy anywhere I got accepted.)
Thanks again.
 

Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
10+ Year Member
Sep 4, 2006
32,666
12,352
The Other Side of the Portal
I got my Masters at a state school in Texas and my time there was remarkable. It felt like home, the culture, the environment, the weather, the food, the people. Due to my job, I have lived in different places but none resembles Texas (well, this particular town). They happen to have a medical school so they immediately became my first choice. Its really more about the place than the school itself. (As far as a school, I think I'd be happy anywhere I got accepted.)
Good reason to relocate, but is it worth a year of your life to establish residency before returning to school (if that's their rule)? Is there a Google office there you could transfer to? Once you get into any med school, keep in mind that it would be easier to match into a residency training position as a nonresident.
 
OP
W
Nov 5, 2010
12
0
Status
Good reason to relocate, but is it worth a year of your life to establish residency before returning to school (if that's their rule)? Is there a Google office there you could transfer to? Once you get into any med school, keep in mind that it would be easier to match into a residency training position as a nonresident.
I was not aware of the residency match being easier if one is a nonresident. That is good to know. Thank you very much for the responses Catalystik!
 

Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
10+ Year Member
Sep 4, 2006
32,666
12,352
The Other Side of the Portal
I didn't choose my words well. I should have said it's easier to match into a Texas residency program than it is to get accepted into one of their med schools. It doesn't matter where your original state of residence was by the time you match into a residency, as residency programs aren't obliged to fill a certain number of spots with in-state folks. I didn't mean to imply that you're more likely to match into Texas as a nonresident than someone who came from Texas.