Mar 27, 2010
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So, my high school and undergrad years were less than impressive. I ended up with a 2.79 GPA for my undergrad with a BS in biology, concentration in microbiology. I moved on to grad school after a year of working in a lab and earned a 3.8 GPA there, taking the thesis based program. I recently took the MCATS (after spending more than a month relearning my chemistry and physics) and earned a 37Q. Also, for the passed 3 years, during and passed my grad school years, I have been running as an EMT.

I graduate this semester (I'm assuming I will have a 3.8 so far, at least. It is a conservative estimate) and I was curious how my application would look. Sure, I've got reasons for my poor grades in college, which improved the last year and a half I was there, but I'm not entirely sure they will really play a factor as I was still a poor student in high school.

Anyway, let me have it.
 
Jan 4, 2010
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So, my high school and undergrad years were less than impressive. I ended up with a 2.79 GPA for my undergrad with a BS in biology, concentration in microbiology. I moved on to grad school after a year of working in a lab and earned a 3.8 GPA there, taking the thesis based program. I recently took the MCATS (after spending more than a month relearning my chemistry and physics) and earned a 37Q. Also, for the passed 3 years, during and passed my grad school years, I have been running as an EMT.

I graduate this semester (I'm assuming I will have a 3.8 so far, at least. It is a conservative estimate) and I was curious how my application would look. Sure, I've got reasons for my poor grades in college, which improved the last year and a half I was there, but I'm not entirely sure they will really play a factor as I was still a poor student in high school.

Anyway, let me have it.
High school grades don't mean @#[email protected] in the med school apps process. Obviously, 2.79 is bad and 37Q is really good. I have no idea how schools will look at this and neither does anyone else on here. You'll really have to go talk to someone who knows what they're talking about such as a member of an adcom at the various schools to which you're interested in applying.
 

Bernoull

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So, my high school and undergrad years were less than impressive. I ended up with a 2.79 GPA for my undergrad with a BS in biology, concentration in microbiology. I moved on to grad school after a year of working in a lab and earned a 3.8 GPA there, taking the thesis based program. I recently took the MCATS (after spending more than a month relearning my chemistry and physics) and earned a 37Q. Also, for the passed 3 years, during and passed my grad school years, I have been running as an EMT.

I graduate this semester (I'm assuming I will have a 3.8 so far, at least. It is a conservative estimate) and I was curious how my application would look. Sure, I've got reasons for my poor grades in college, which improved the last year and a half I was there, but I'm not entirely sure they will really play a factor as I was still a poor student in high school.

Anyway, let me have it.
Impressive grad gpa and MCAT. The problem remains that ur grad gpa doesn't replace ur undergrad which is more heavily weighted. A postbac/SMP would have improved ur odds much more than grad school.

Anyway, there's no going back, so right now your concern should be getting screened out based on ur uGPA. Most schools have numeric cutoffs, so you really need to talk to the specific schools to see what their uGPA cutoffs are, rather than wasting time/efforts with schools that will reject ur app, out of hand, based on ur uGPA.

For the schools that look past ur UGPA, you do have a chance bcos u have redeemed urself academically. It will also help if u addressed ur uGPA (if u have a good reason) to provide some context for ur grades.

Apply very early and broadly.

GL :luck::luck:
 

Xcited392

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So, my high school and undergrad years were less than impressive. I ended up with a 2.79 GPA for my undergrad with a BS in biology, concentration in microbiology. I moved on to grad school after a year of working in a lab and earned a 3.8 GPA there, taking the thesis based program. I recently took the MCATS (after spending more than a month relearning my chemistry and physics) and earned a 37Q. Also, for the passed 3 years, during and passed my grad school years, I have been running as an EMT.

I graduate this semester (I'm assuming I will have a 3.8 so far, at least. It is a conservative estimate) and I was curious how my application would look. Sure, I've got reasons for my poor grades in college, which improved the last year and a half I was there, but I'm not entirely sure they will really play a factor as I was still a poor student in high school.

Anyway, let me have it.
While you have certainly done well in mastering the sciences (based on your MCAT score), a masters degree will not change your low undergraduate GPA . Some schools will weigh your graduate work lightly, since most ADCOMs have said that graduate school grading tends to be inflated. This is not to say that you haven't done well, but that is how some people will look at it.

A 2.79 GPA might get screened out early in the application process. You could go take more undergraduate courses to raise your GPA, but it seems illogical for you to finish an MS and then go back to do undergraduate work.

Usually, people with low GPAs and high MCATs are ideal candidates for Special Masters Programs (SMP). Go check out the post-baccalaureate forum for a list of SMPs. The good ones (BU, Georgetown, etc.) help students with low GPAs and high MCATs get into medical school by allowing to take 1st year medical courses, graded against the med students. The Georgetown program has a 3.0 cutoff, but BU has admitted students with a sub-3.0 GPA.

You could also get in touch with med school admissions to talk with them about your chances or ways to improve your application.
 

J ROD

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That undergrad GPA will hold you back....the grad GPA will be seen as a nice extra but not make up for the undergrad.

I think that MCAT could get you some consideration depending on what state you are from.

I would still highly recommend doing some postbac undergrad work to get that GPA over 3.0 OR

look into a SMP program...
 
Mar 27, 2010
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Out of curiosity, what are some good Post Bacc programs. Do they really make that much of a difference? For example, if I got >3.5 GPA in the Post Bacc courses, does that override my performance as an undergrad? I am asking because my undergrad GPA also includes non-science classes, which were the main reasons I did poorly.

Thanks,
J. W.
 

gymtanlaundry

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no one gets a 37 and still calls it "the MCATS," or was an EMT for the "passed 3 years." troll.
 
Mar 27, 2010
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The question wasn't whether you believed me or not. Don't hijack my thread by trolling it. Anyway, if someone can answer my question I would appreciate it. But, if you've got childish comments, keep them to yourself.
 
Jan 4, 2010
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The question wasn't whether you believed me or not. Don't hijack my thread by trolling it. Anyway, if someone can answer my question I would appreciate it. But, if you've got childish comments, keep them to yourself.
I did answer your question. Nobody's opinion on here matters. How each school views your terrible GPA/excellent MCAT combo is up to that school only. Anything else you hear is nonsense. So, my advice to you is to arrange a meeting with an adcom member at several of the schools to which you're interested in applying and talk to them about it.

Out of curiosity, what are some good Post Bacc programs. Do they really make that much of a difference? For example, if I got >3.5 GPA in the Post Bacc courses, does that override my performance as an undergrad? I am asking because my undergrad GPA also includes non-science classes, which were the main reasons I did poorly.

Thanks,
J. W.
Wayne State will wipe out your AMCAS sGPA if you have at least 20 hours of graduate coursework in a graduate program when you apply. However, they also heavily favor MI residents. But that is at least one MD school that is willing to forgive part of your undergraduate record.