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Current MDs who were Engineers

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical Allopathic [ MD ]' started by WhippleWhileWeWork, 05.15.14.

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  1. WhippleWhileWeWork

    WhippleWhileWeWork 2+ Year Member

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    If there are any current residents or attendings who were practicing engineers in their former lives, I have some questions I'd like to throw your way. First question:

    Do we have any here?
     
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  3. mizzu

    mizzu Banned Banned Account on Hold

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    You are asking in the pre-med area. Mostly students will be answering
     
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  4. xnfs93hy

    xnfs93hy 7+ Year Member

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    Ask this in Allo or a similar subforum. This is pre-allo. I'm a ChemE major. I know for a fact that we have former engineers here who have gone on to medical school.
     
  5. terp720

    terp720 2+ Year Member

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    pre-med students are not allowed to post in the Allo forums. It would just get moved here. This is the correct place for posting unless Whipple is now a med student.
     
  6. WhippleWhileWeWork

    WhippleWhileWeWork 2+ Year Member

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    Terp ftw.
     
  7. Plecopotamus

    Plecopotamus 2+ Year Member

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    I don't start residency for another month, but I'm available for questions if you think I can answer them.
     
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  8. gobigorgohome22

    gobigorgohome22 2+ Year Member

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    Do you mean an an actual PE? If so, that's going to be very rare since it takes so long and become one and you will probably stick with it if you got your PE. If you mean just an engineer, yea not that uncommon.
     
  9. WhippleWhileWeWork

    WhippleWhileWeWork 2+ Year Member

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    No, that's not what I mean. A PE is a "Professional Engineer" and it only takes 5 years of work experience to be eligible for the exam in many states.

    I mean someone who actually worked in the engineering field and/or industry as Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, Chemical, Petroleum, etc engineer, for a few years and is now practicing medicine.
     
    Last edited: 05.17.14
  10. WhippleWhileWeWork

    WhippleWhileWeWork 2+ Year Member

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    Maybe you can, what's your background?
     
  11. Plecopotamus

    Plecopotamus 2+ Year Member

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    civil
     
  12. WhippleWhileWeWork

    WhippleWhileWeWork 2+ Year Member

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    Ok, great. So one question I've been kicking around is....

    I see many residents on here say things like "MS1 and MS2 were completely irrelevant to my practice of medicine". I'm wondering if it's similar to the situation in engineering where you take a class like thermodynamics that has very little direct applicability to a civil engineer's practical day to day occupation. But understanding the larger concepts of work and energy could answer some of the "why" or "what if" questions if you chose to think about them?

    If that's too obtuse, what I mean is:
    I rarely use heat transfer calcs in my day to day job. But having learned the ins and outs of cond/conv/rad I can usually predict within a few safety factors if a problem might arise or explain why a problem is happening due to heat loss or gain if certain types of problems present themselves.

    Is it this way in medicine, where learning some of the more obscure biochem, path, pharm, etc isn't directly applicable but if called up could/would actually help explain what may or may not be happening?
     

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