Mr hawkings

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Is there anything in D.O schools similar to the MD-PHD programs in M.D schools? If yes, do they generally have a wide range of research opprtunities in basic sciences?
 

Kevbot

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Mr hawkings said:
Is there anything in D.O schools similar to the MD-PHD programs in M.D schools? If yes, do they generally have a wide range of research opprtunities in basic sciences?
Yes. This was discuss before. You can do a search on bottom of forum.

But anyway... DO/PhD is offered by a whole number of DO schools. Especially state schools. MSU, OSU, NJ, Texas one, etc... they have a good range of basic science research, especially MSU.

There are some private schools that also offer it.

I am too lazy to go to aacom.org website to look them up.

I will add that UNECOM is prob starting a DO/PhD program soon.
 
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Mr hawkings

Mr hawkings

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thank you for your responses
 

annh31

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Ohio University has a program too. And yeah, they seemed to have a lot of potential projects because the school is attached to a large undergrad campus.
 

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Mr hawkings said:
Is there anything in D.O schools similar to the MD-PHD programs in M.D schools? If yes, do they generally have a wide range of research opprtunities in basic sciences?
OSU-COM has a D.O./Ph.D. program. We have one student in it in our class.

http://www.osu-med.com
 

gnin

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Unless your research interests lie in something related to the skeletal system, avoid going the DO route. Academic and research medicine is a highly prestige conscious field, and having to put "DO" on your resume will not be a positive thing. This is because, fairly or not, many doctors still view osteopathy as a pseudoscience, and see osteopaths as people who couldn't get into a regular medical school. (I don't particularly agree with these sentiments, but many doctors still hold them.) Also, you'll be at a significant disadvantage in applying to mainstream residency programs.

I know I'm gonna get flamed to death for what I just said, but I'm simply telling it like it is.
 

DrMom

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I can't see how we'd be considered to be practicing pseudoscience when we essentially practice exactly the same as MDs. :rolleyes:

And, at least at OSU-COM, I know of no PhDs doing research on the skeletal system. :laugh:
 

gnin

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DrMom said:
I can't see how we'd be considered to be practicing pseudoscience when we essentially practice exactly the same as MDs. :rolleyes:

And, at least at OSU-COM, I know of no PhDs doing research on the skeletal system. :laugh:

Hey, as I mentioned above, I personally don't agree with the "DO=pseudoscience" argument. But If you go into research you'll need to be apply for NIH andfederal funding all the time. The NIH is run by crusty old grads of schools like Harvard and Hopkins, and many of these people haven't let go of their prejudices toward anything that is new or remotely "non-traditional."
 

OSUdoc08

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gnin said:
Unless your research interests lie in something related to the skeletal system, avoid going the DO route. Academic and research medicine is a highly prestige conscious field, and having to put "DO" on your resume will not be a positive thing. This is because, fairly or not, many doctors still view osteopathy as a pseudoscience, and see osteopaths as people who couldn't get into a regular medical school. (I don't particularly agree with these sentiments, but many doctors still hold them.) Also, you'll be at a significant disadvantage in applying to mainstream residency programs.

I know I'm gonna get flamed to death for what I just said, but I'm simply telling it like it is.
:thumbdown:

:sleep:
 

annh31

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gnin said:
Unless your research interests lie in something related to the skeletal system, avoid going the DO route. Academic and research medicine is a highly prestige conscious field, and having to put "DO" on your resume will not be a positive thing. This is because, fairly or not, many doctors still view osteopathy as a pseudoscience, and see osteopaths as people who couldn't get into a regular medical school. (I don't particularly agree with these sentiments, but many doctors still hold them.) Also, you'll be at a significant disadvantage in applying to mainstream residency programs.

I know I'm gonna get flamed to death for what I just said, but I'm simply telling it like it is.


No, I completely disagree. At OU the DO/PhD coordinator is an MD/PhD herself, and MANY if not all of the projects are in biochemistry, engineering, or cell biology. She didn't even mention OMM or DO-based research. Basically, with an undergrad campus attached to the med school, there are tons of possibilities for doing a research project that you are interested in doing.
 

Sundarban1

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gnin said:
Hey, as I mentioned above, I personally don't agree with the "DO=pseudoscience" argument. But If you go into research you'll need to be apply for NIH andfederal funding all the time. The NIH is run by crusty old grads of schools like Harvard and Hopkins, and many of these people haven't let go of their prejudices toward anything that is new or remotely "non-traditional."
These prejudices exist thanks to people like you who perpetuate a few narrow minded views and tern them into gospel. :thumbdown:
 

stochastic

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I am a DO/PhD student at OSU-COM (i.e., the one mentioned above).

These prejudices exist. Those guys at the NIH may have them. I don't know. I haven't met any DO/PhDs and asked them and unless you have DO NOT perpetuate such crap! I will be going to the First Annual meeting for dual degree Osteopathic students in June at MSU-COM. There will be several DO/PhDs that will be presenting their research and talking about their careers. Info on that meeting can be found at:

http://www.com.msu.edu/mstp/seminar-national.html

The research done by myself and the other DO/PhD students ahead of me at OSU-COM is comparable to research done at allopathic institutions. It is definitely not pseudoscience. My research advisor actually came to our school after being at an allopathic school for a long time. He has multiple R01s(really big grants, several are >1M) from the NIH. His research has not changed at all in changing to an osteopathic institution.

Basically, the basic sciences at allopathic and osteopathic schools are the same. That is not where the differences lie that distinguish the two. They lie in two factors:

1) the clinical education in all four years is different
2) DO students learn OMT