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D.O.s in Plastic/Reconstructive surgery

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by doctorperez, Jan 18, 2001.

  1. doctorperez

    doctorperez Jesus was a dissident

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    How do D.O.s fare in general when trying to match for plastic reconstructive surgery residencies?. Thank you! .
     
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  3. surgery

    surgery Member

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    Never heard of D.O. matched in Plastics out of med. school. I think it is an next to impossible task.

    There are D.O.s who obtained plastics fellowhips after they have completed their gen. surgery residency. Yet it is still a very difficult process.

    Not to discourage you, but that's the way life is. Good luck.
     
  4. doctorperez

    doctorperez Jesus was a dissident

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    Do you mean to say that it is more difficult for a D.O. to match a P.S. residency than an M.D.?... I do not mean right out of Medschool , I mean after the general surgery residency . Thanks .
     
  5. surgery

    surgery Member

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    No question about it.

    Many prestigious academic institutions never has D.O. surgery residents and do not want to have D.O. They rather have foreign trained M.D.


    The best bet for you is to get into an allopathic surgery residency, finish and apply for plastics. However, I know my program never accept D.O.s, and perhaps never consider one.
     
  6. That's a bunch of crap. I've been reading your past posts and you are awfully sympathetic to FMGs Is it because you were a FMG who couldn't get into any U.S. med school (MD or DO)? Don't give that type of lousy information just because you were lucky enough to matriculate into a surgery residency. How do you know what many prestigious institutions do? There are several D.O.s in many competitive residency programs. For instance, I noticed on another thread that there is a Chief Resident of Neurosurgery at UC Davis who is a D.O. I guess your general surgery residency at a small community hospital compares to that, huh?


    I also noticed your criticism of another member's english. Dude, look at your own post!!!

    If you read old threads, or talk to other members other than "surgery", you will find that the pecking order is usually: US MD, US DO, and then FMG. D.O.s can also opt to do a DO residency. Definitely go to a US allopathic school if you get in. I have nothing against FMGs but the way the system is setup now, it is extremely difficult for an FMG to get into a US residency. Just go to the International section and you will see a ton of frustrated FMGs who didn't match or didn't get interviewed. Of course there are exceptions like "surgery". No, I'm not a D.O., I just think you are providing inaccurate information.
    I've been receiving a lot of criticsm for starting arguments on another section of SDN. I don't want to start another one here. I know you'll probably rip on me but I'm not going to respond. My point is that you should read the opinions of other members or talk to other surgery residents. I just wanted to offer a different point of view. Don't go just by what I say and certainly not "surgery".


    [This message has been edited by loukary (edited 01-21-2001).]
     
  7. surgery

    surgery Member

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    Loukary, my dear colleague,

    No need to write a book to make an argument for your naive comments.

    Anybody is entitled to their own opinions.

    But anyone who thinks D.O.s will get equal considerations at Ivy league surgery programs as M.D.s must be dreaming.

    From an Ivy league grad, Ivy league surgery program resident.
     
  8. surgery,

    Out of curiosity, would you personally take a FMG over a DO, given the same board scores?

     
  9. drusso

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved

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    I think that surgery programs are way more open to DO's than FMGs. Surgery programs take "hits" on their accreditation reviews for each non-US graduate that they accept. DO's, being US Graduates, are acceptable.

    By the way, the I know the ortho trauma fellow at Baylor and he's a DO, as well as a the chief neurosurgery resident at UC Davis is a DO too. Surgeons, being somewhat simpleminded, could care less about what degree one holds and far more about work ethic and being a good team player.
     
  10. doctorperez

    doctorperez Jesus was a dissident

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    Ok so!

    I appreciate your comments , however , for some of us who have to decide whether to go one way or another it is important to go beyond opinions and get the facts . Is there anywhere where this issue can be settled officially ..I mean some agency that states the truth of whether D.O.s are not welcome in subspecialty surgery residencies? . Thanks .
     
  11. drusso

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved

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    Check out: http://www.facs.org/about_college/acsdept/jacs/lead_articles/jun99fulltext.html

    The Longitudinal Study of Surgical Residents, 1994 to 1996

    Francis Kwakwa, MA, Olga Jonasson, MD, FACS

    Background: The American College of Surgeons (ACS) has conducted a detailed annual survey of residents enrolled in surgical graduate medical education (GME) programs since 1982 and has regularly published the resulting data as the Longitudinal Study of Surgical Residents. This report documents surgical resident enrollment and graduation for the academic years 1994-95 and 1995-96.

    Study Design: The Medical Education Research and Information Database of the American Medical Association was supplemented by the existing ACS Resident Masterfile and by personal contact with program directors and their staffs to verify accuracy and completeness of reporting. Each resident was tracked individually through surgical GME.

    Results: The total number of surgical residents graduating from surgical GME in 1995 and 1996 has not changed since 1982. Most graduates of surgical residency programs are in obstetrics and gynecology, followed by general surgery; demographic analysis of the graduating cohort shows that most are Caucasian male graduates of US or Canadian medical schools, and that their age at graduation is 33 to 35 years. International medical graduates (IMG) make up 8.9% of entering surgical residents and 6% of graduates. Osteopathic medical school graduates account for 1.2% to 1.3% of entering and graduating surgical residents.

    Women represent 27% of entering and 23% to 24% of graduates of surgical GME. The largest number and proportion of women in surgical GME are enrolled in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, where they make up the majority of entering and graduating classes. When all other surgical residency program enrollments are considered together, women make up 17% and 16% of entering residents in 1994 and 1995, respectively, and 13% and 14% of graduates in those years.

    Conclusions: Surgical GME enrollment and graduation is stable. Few women and ethnic minorities are enrolled in surgical residency programs. IMG enrollment and graduation in surgical GME is low. (J Am Coll Surg 1999;188:575-585. ? 1999 by the American College of Surgeons)

    Also check out:
    http://www.aobs.org/



     

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