aldol16

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Nov 1, 2015
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It depends what you're talking about. Are you doing something wrong and they are telling you how to improve? Or is everything you're doing wrong to them and they make snide remarks about every little thing? Because there's a difference. If you're doing something wrong, then you must learn to accept feedback in order to improve your skills. If they just want things done their way, well, you should do that if they have rank over you. That's how work is everywhere. The lesson one should take from this is that it's always easier to be one's own boss.
 

frosted2

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This is also VERY dependent on whether or not you are a tech, CNA, nurse, etc...
 
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hurtem&healem

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ime, "competitive" is the wrong word. Hyper-critical is closer. "Bitchy" is probably the best I can come up with. Basically, people love to talk ****. It's not just in medicine, you will find it in just about any industry. My best advice is to remind yourself, "They can go **** themselves," and carry on doing your job.

Unless of course they are your superior, or right and being constructive.
 
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TRPMinus

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Apr 27, 2016
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ime, "competitive" is the wrong word. Hyper-critical is closer. "Bitchy" is probably the best I can come up with. Basically, people love to talk ****. It's not just in medicine, you will find it in just about any industry. My best advice is to remind yourself, "They can go **** themselves," and carry on doing your job.

Unless of course they are your superior, or right and being constructive.
Sometimes they are right, but often times particular people at work "target" newer people (although not new at their job) if they feel threatened by them or perceive them as confident, etc. Dealing with all that right now. Getting called out on the stupidest **** is getting old fast and she's about to get a foot up her ass if she keeps doing it.
 

Moko

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I think that the important thing to distinguish is intent. If they are otherwise constructive and have good intentions, I talk with them to see if their feedback can be delivered in a different way (e.g. in a private setting or in a less critical tone). Often times they don't realize that their feedback is being poorly received and it helps them as well. Giving appropriate feedback is a learned skill.

This is completely lateral in nature.
Have you asked her in a private setting why she is pointing out your flaws in public and not in private? You could ask her to change her delivery, and if it continues, to talk with her supervisor if you believe her actions to be inappropriate. Healthcare is a stressful setting with lots of different personalities, but that should never justify "crossing boundaries", especially within earshot of patients.
 

Crayola227

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If you go to medical school, become a student, a resident, you will really just have to suck up huge amounts of abuse. Sorry. Don't know what to do about it.

Look up the SMART feedback method, Balint groups, non-violent communication, and hope that you can use/pass on those skills in the workplace to help change the culture from the inside. That's about it.

There was only one time that something was said against me that was actionable and not stupid career-wise for me to report and it was handled just fine.

If you're not pre-med, I don't see what's up with this thread.
 

ldiot

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Good luck dealing with the bitchy nurses... once you are a doctor don't stir up the henhouse or you will get lots of criticism.
 
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Lawper

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Good luck dealing with the bitchy nurses... once you are a doctor don't stir up the henhouse or you will get lots of criticism.
Thanks for the advice, ldiot :happy:
 
May 4, 2015
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The only ppl I take criticism from are the supervisors who were usually my bosses in terms of hiring. I worked in healthcare to know that respecting the older workers was also a good thing but there were those mean oldies that kept on acting like they were doctors so for some there are exceptions. Im not talking being nice to the airheads that were in their later 20s 30s and 40s. These were usually the insecure crowds that liked to talk **** abt ppl and even the supervisor. They also were what we call bullies that waited next in line to get promoted and so usually resorted to insulting coworkers in public or private to bring them down. It doesn't matter if Danny over there graduated from a top school, at work even the person who came from no name university can be very overbearing. Taking criticism meant to me to talk differently with ppl in accordance to their personality. You have to learn how to be semi-friends with all your coworkers. Those that are past hope need to be avoided otherwise they may take off all their anger on you. Also, there is no right method doing one job. You'll note that your supervisor might like detailed summary while a coworker who acts like they have 6 kids might want you to stop doing that. So then you got to meet both halfway otherwise you will never hear the end of the gossip mill. Overall, keep yourself busy. Don't ever sit down to relax and be idle even if you've had a hard day. Do some activity to remain busy and if you look busy very few ppl will come over to bother you. You got to do this even as a doctor. It's good practice. Make friends with the ppl who got your back and if there aren't any then just do your job and indulge in fun hobbies after work. It's all abt that growing up;). Don't let ppl push you around. If you quit you'll never learn the lesson. Most successful docs need a thick skin so working in the environment will only make you better.
 
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