Dec 28, 2011
2
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi,

I'm in the process of figuring out whether I should apply for a MPH in epi or an MS in biostat. I've been working in the pharmacy sector for the past 3 years as a pharm tech because I thought I wanted a pharmd; however, I don't think pharmacy school would greatly benefit my career goals. Long term, I think I just want to work in the pharma industry. I love thinking about the trends/effects in medications and I've always been amazed about what you can tell about a population based on their popular medication usage. I'm very interested in how a drug is deemed effective and how drug regulations are made. I think both epi and biostat would be helpful but I'm also interested in the job prospect, especially in the west coast.

Any advices would be useful! Thanks in advance!
 
Aug 21, 2013
14
0
Minnesota
Status
Other Health Professions Student
I'm in exactly the same boat. I started my masters in biostats this fall, but took an epi course and loved it. I'm also working as a student worker at the state department of health in the Infectious Disease and Epidemiology division, and the work is really interesting. I find epi research really interesting, and I think that I may go get a degree in epi after.

I can tell you this about biostats. If you want an ms in biostats, you should have a strong math background. Like, you should be able to calculate double and triple integrals, understand series and sequences, have experience with matrices and vector calculus, programming knowledge (since you will do everything in SAS and/or R), and have exposure to mathematical notation. If your math background is lacking a bit, you might want to consider taking some courses before you apply as refreshers, or consider going the epi route.
 

thedrjojo

10+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2008
23,954
16,302
Status
Attending Physician
I'm in exactly the same boat. I started my masters in biostats this fall, but took an epi course and loved it. I'm also working as a student worker at the state department of health in the Infectious Disease and Epidemiology division, and the work is really interesting. I find epi research really interesting, and I think that I may go get a degree in epi after.

I can tell you this about biostats. If you want an ms in biostats, you should have a strong math background. Like, you should be able to calculate double and triple integrals, understand series and sequences, have experience with matrices and vector calculus, programming knowledge (since you will do everything in SAS and/or R), and have exposure to mathematical notation. If your math background is lacking a bit, you might want to consider taking some courses before you apply as refreshers, or consider going the epi route.
MPH in biostats is math heavy, but in my program, no calculus has been needed.

I could have (and in retrospect wish I did, since I think I ended up taking the requirements to fulfill the dual concentration) dual concentrated in biostats and epi, which might also be an option