Mar 16, 2010
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Other Health Professions Student
hi guys, i need your advice:

i graduated from undergrad two years ago, but my undergrad gpa is not very good, its only a 2.8. :thumbdown:

i applied to a couple MPH programs with DAT scores and only got into New York Medical College. I've been taking some MPH courses part time and doing well in them to try to show that I can handle graduate level work. I'm not sure if i should take this acceptance or if i should keep taking some public health grad classes, take the GRE and try to do awesome on it and then re-apply again.

Please help! I can't decide. I don't want to be in the same boat one year from now with no acceptances after having taken more classes and the GRE! Should I just go to NYMC?
 
Dec 9, 2009
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Well I just want to say that I've gotten into several programs and my GPA was no where near as high as many people on this board. I suggest that you take the GRE and do well. It's good that you've taken MPH courses, it definitely shows that you're capable and can only work in your favor. (You might want to see if you can get a certificate if you decide to hold off for next year).

I really believe that strong recs and a solid personal statement can make all the difference when applying to public health programs. However, it also depends on what concentration you'd like to go into. I think you should talk to admissions reps/counselors and maybe even profs at schools you'd like to attend, just to get a feeling of what's expected and what you can do to make yourself the best applicant possible.

Nothing is going to change your GPA really but it is most certainly not the end all be all.

That said, I know nothing about NY Medical College. I think if you see it as a good fit for you and it's accredited then you should perhaps consider it.
 
Mar 16, 2010
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I have no experience with public health admissions in particular, but a 2.8 GPA will not get you past the door in most competitive graduate programs, regardless of almost anything else you do (there are just too many better qualified applicants to pick a long-shot).
 
OP
S
Mar 16, 2010
3
0
Status
Other Health Professions Student
Thanks for your reply! Congrats on getting in! I've taken two MPH courses so far and gotten A's in both. I've also been working in the health field full time for the last two years.

However, I talked to the advisor at the school i want to go to yesterday and he said if i have admission somewhere and its accredited (which it is) then i should take it. Apparently my GPA will always hinder my application, even if i have great recommendations, good GRE scores and these grad classes to fall back on.

I haven't visited NYMC yet, but I just wanted to see people's opinions about the grad programs there.
 
Dec 9, 2009
121
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Status
I have no experience with public health admissions in particular, but a 2.8 GPA will not get you past the door in most competitive graduate programs, regardless of almost anything else you do (there are just too many better qualified applicants to pick a long-shot).
Um...what do you consider competitive C:? Because I think some of the programs I've gotten into are pretty competitive? Like Tulane, UPitt, and UIC and my GPA didn't seem to hinder me too much.

That said, a higher GPA will always help but it's not the end all be all. Especially since the OP has said they've done graduate work.
 

INTPThinker

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Nov 9, 2008
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I had a lower gpa and got into a top school. However, I did have around a 1400 and a publication under my belt. I did not take any grad courses before I applied.
 

Stories

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Thanks for your reply! Congrats on getting in! I've taken two MPH courses so far and gotten A's in both. I've also been working in the health field full time for the last two years.

However, I talked to the advisor at the school i want to go to yesterday and he said if i have admission somewhere and its accredited (which it is) then i should take it. Apparently my GPA will always hinder my application, even if i have great recommendations, good GRE scores and these grad classes to fall back on.

I haven't visited NYMC yet, but I just wanted to see people's opinions about the grad programs there.
If you really want to take a risk, go take class at the school you're interested in going to as a non-enrolled student and rock out in those classes. It'll be expensive, but if all works out, you'll already have the credit for those classes ready to transfer and demonstrate your ability to succeed in their program.
 
OP
S
Mar 16, 2010
3
0
Status
Other Health Professions Student
If you really want to take a risk, go take class at the school you're interested in going to as a non-enrolled student and rock out in those classes. It'll be expensive, but if all works out, you'll already have the credit for those classes ready to transfer and demonstrate your ability to succeed in their program.
Thats the thing... the two grad classes I took were at the school I wanted to go to, but they rejected me. The only acceptance I have is NYMC. :confused:
 

Stories

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Thats the thing... the two grad classes I took were at the school I wanted to go to, but they rejected me. The only acceptance I have is NYMC. :confused:
In that case, unless your heart is going to break or you can't fathom the idea of going to NYMC, count the blessing of getting in there. You got in somewhere and that is an accomplishment! Congrats! :)