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Dental question about cheek biting... How did my cheeks heal so fast!?

Discussion in 'Dental Residents and Practicing Dentists' started by Med1992, Jul 30, 2015.

  1. Med1992

    7+ Year Member

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    So I'm a pre-dental still in college but that's besides the point... I have a serious dental question and I wanna hear professional input as to how this happened.

    So since I was a little kid, I've always been a crazy cheek biter... I bit them so much and so frequently (like bit skin off all the time) that eventually, my cheeks and lips were really rough and covered in this whitish layer. Two days ago, I had a dental procedure done--gum grafting--for a recession problem; I've been prescribed Motrin, Peridex, and Amoxicillin.

    I noticed today my cheeks feel entirely brand new. No whitish coloration, no rough feeling... they're healthy pink and completely smooth though my lips are still a little bit rough but not as bad as before. How on earth did it get better that fast?

    My first thought was Peridex doing something but I don't know... I guess I didn't bite them as much after the gum graft, but I still wouldn't expect my cheeks/lips to have completely renewed themselves in just two days to feel completely different. But now, I'm planning on using this to stop biting to break the habit.

    Any input?
     
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  3. Hedgy

    7+ Year Member

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    Dentist
    Hello,

    Cheek biting is common and is usually associated with stress. The white that you see is hyperkeratosis and is often linear in form along the plane where you teeth come together (linea alba). This is caused by all of the friction from teeth rubbing against the cheeks when you clench or grind (usually at night while sleeping). Post surgery, I suspect that you have been babying the area and may be subconsciously more aware of the area when you are sleeping, so you may not be clenching or grinding as much. Also, the epithelium in the oral cavity has a high turnover, so heals very fast.

    Peridex is an antibacterial mouthrinse. We use it to keep the bacterial load down in the area of the surgery as you shouldn't be brushing there for awhile after the surgery. Because of the decrease in bacteria at the surgical site, it has a secondary affect of improving healing of the surgical site. Since it kills good and bad bacteria, we don't usually use it long term.

    It seems like you have a well documented history of clenching/grinding. I suggest you discuss a potential need for occlussal guard (aka nightguard) with your dentist.
     
    CanaDMD likes this.

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