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Dental Residency=Dental License???

Discussion in 'Dental Residents and Practicing Dentists' started by Shark007, Apr 14, 2007.

  1. Shark007

    Shark007 Junior Member
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    I am going into an AEGD starting in July and I have heard that if you complete a residency year in New York (2007) or in California (2008), that you can practice in these states. My question is, do you have to do the residency in these states for it to apply. Can you do a residency in another state and still get licensed in California/New York? Are these the only two states that are offering this?

    I am scheduled to take the WREB in a couple weeks and I also heard that if you take a license exam and then fail, then the residency no longer counts towards practicing anywhere.

    If anyone can comment about this, I would appreciate it.:D
     
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  3. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    I'll discuss New York since I just applied for a license there. First, if you are licensed in another state then you must practice for TWO years prior to being licensed in New York. You must have also passed NBDE I & II.

    If you are NOT licensed in another state, then you must do a one-year PGY residency to obtain an initial NY license (or you must get licensed in another state via a traditional licensure exam such as WERB, NERB, etc. and practice for two years prior to applying for the NYS license).

    So you can fail the WREB and still practice in New York, you'll just have do a one year residency in order to apply.

    The whole "do a year of residency instead of taking a licensure exam" thing only applies to INITIAL licensure. Basically for grads fresh out of school. As I said before, grads with licenses elsewhere can get a NY license if they have practiced for two years elsewhere.

    I hope that answers some of your questions. I don't think California does the residency-instead-of-exam thing, but I could be wrong.
     
  4. 3rdmolarslayer

    3rdmolarslayer Junior Member
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    does this pgy thing only apply to gpr and aegd?
     
  5. Shark007

    Shark007 Junior Member
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    I appreciate the responses. I hope that you are right and that if the worse should happen after taking the WREB that I can still apply for licensure in New York. I know that California is planning something similar and I have seen it on their website, but nothing is in stone as of yet (like I said, it's suppose to happen in 2008). I wrote to the California dental board and the New York dental board to try and verify about the failure of a licensing exam and still using your residency as your credential.


    According to the New York dental board website, this is open to all specialties and GPR/AEGD programs. They just say to check with your program director to make sure your residency will let you go this route.

    www.op.nysed.gov/dent.htm
     
  6. rahmed

    rahmed SDN Angel
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    Besides New York, Connecticut is now allowing license through PGY-1 residency (check website). Washington is starting a pilot program...the unique thing about their PGY-1 requirement is that 'the residency must be completed ina low income clinic'. California will require an AEGD (and not GPR/other residency) for their licensing program through residency. Minnesota has decided on similar policy but I haven't come across the details.

    The source of reference for all the above info is "ADAhandbook_newgrad.pdf"
     
  7. Shark007

    Shark007 Junior Member
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    When it comes down to it, my greatest fear is failing the WREB exam and not being able to use my PGY-1 residency credential, because I failed a license exam (which i'm not sure is the case, I e-mailed many of those dental boards to find out). On the other hand, I paid $1600 for that exam and i'm sure I wouldn't be able to get any type of refund at this point. I feel prepared for the exam, but you never know what will happen. When I signed up for the WREB I wanted to be able to moonlight if I wanted to, but the program i'm going to is so busy, I doubt i'd have time.
    I guess I should have given a little background to my first post. One of my friends is going to a residency at UCLA and she was the one who first told me that you might not be able to use your PGY-1 license option if you fail a licensing exam.
     
  8. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    Well, like I said, if you want to practice in New York, it doesn't matter if you fail the WREB. All you have to do is a PGY-1 to get licensed there. But when (or if) you move to another state, chances are you'll have to take a licensure exam then.

    The short advice is to take the WREB (you'll pass) and not worry about it. Don't rely on a residency as a licensure method.
     
  9. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    Sheesh, that's ridiculous. A one-year AEGD is good enough to get licensure, but a 4-year oral surgery residency (or any other specialty) isn't?
     
  10. Shark007

    Shark007 Junior Member
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    Thanks for all the advice. I will do the best I can do on the WREB and see what happens from there.

    It seems like many of the states offering this option with the exception of New York, don't really give clear guidelines on the PGY-1 for a license route.
     
  11. ScorpiORTHO

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    what does inital licensure mean?
     
  12. Shark007

    Shark007 Junior Member
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    This is the reply I got from the NY dental board. GavinC...I will never doubt you again :D

    "If you successfully complete an ADA approved residency program, you
    would be eligible to apply for a license in NYS. Failure of any part of
    a licensing examination no longer comes into play for a license in NY.

    NYS Board for Dentistry"
     
  13. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    It means it is your first license--you haven't been licensed anywhere else in the US. If you have been licensed in another US state you must practice for two years PRIOR to applying to New York for a license.
     
  14. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    Like I said, I just completed the NY licensure process. :)
     
  15. 3rdmolarslayer

    3rdmolarslayer Junior Member
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    so for oral surgery residents do they just have to finish pgy1 to be eligible for a licence or do they have to complete the whole residency
     
  16. KatieJune

    KatieJune Senior Member
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    Does anyone know any more about Washington's pilot program to license by credential if you do a PGY1? I can't find anything about it on the WA dental board website. Thanks
     
  17. setdoc7

    Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    In NYS you must complete a PGY 1 level postgraduate program to get a license now, passing a license exam us no longer enough. You cannot get a license straight out of school anymore in NYS On the other hand you can get a NYS license without taking a license exam by completing a PGY 1 year and fulfilling the NYS requirements, your director then has to sign off for the license,
     
  18. Shark007

    Shark007 Junior Member
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    Actually...I wrote a bunch of dental boards to get more information on the subject. Washington was the only one that didn't back to me (i'll probably have to write them again). Of course that might mean that they're not even sure yet on how they are going to structure the residency for license program. For instance, Minnesota said that the PGY-1 only counted for licensure if you did the residency in Minnesota. I'm starting to wonder if Washington is going to go down that avenue because of the underserved population they have there.
     
  19. eliteOMFS

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    An AEGD or GPR your first year post dental school anywhere in the country will give you the opportunity to obtain a license in California. As long as the program is accredited by the ADA or a national accreditation body you should be fine. I have the law printed out. The PGY-1 will not hold up if you fail a licensure exam and you then must pass your exam (no exceptions). I know most of this is repetitive, but I have looked very hard into this as an OMFS program doesn't qualify. What's a class II composite anyway? If you don't have to take the WREB I wouldn't.
     
  20. eliteOMFS

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    Washington now accepts the PGY-1 in low income areas as I have friends that have heard back from the Washington Dental Board. In addition, the change in California is fairly new - when I called the California Board the person there was in the works to put it up on the web.
     
  21. Shark007

    Shark007 Junior Member
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    Do you happen to know if Washington is like California in which if you have failed a licensure exam then the PGY-1 doesnt count? I guess I'll find out in a couple weeks whether or not taking the WREB was a good idea. Although, not all states care if you have failed a license exam in your past (i.e New York).
     
  22. MitPat

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    Please can you give me some idea about this program as to where can we find this program, and its requirements, can a foreign trained dentist apply for this program........please guide me....thanks for your time
     
  23. Dr.Millisevert

    Dr.Millisevert Senior Member
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    When are they ever going to get it together enough to have one national exam. Each state might as well be a diff country. Crazyness.
     
  24. setdoc7

    Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    How have you completed your licensure process for NYS without having done any post grad work yet? I thought you were just graduating school now? NYS requires 1 year post grad prior to licensure (initial). Or....are you talking about a limited permit, which is not a license?
     
  25. futureD

    futureD Member
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    Are you sure about this? May I ask where you found this info? I'd like to read it myself. I tried to find it on the CA board website but couldn't.

    Thanks alot. 'Really appreciated everyone who threw in their 0.02.

     
  26. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    Yep, the limited permit.
     
  27. setdoc7

    Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    The limited permit process in NYS is quite different from actual licensure, as your program director is signing off on your permit in a supervisory capacity. You are not permited to work outside of the residency training program approved environment. Further, you will not be able to obtain a DEA # nor malpractice insurance with this permit to work privately. It is obviously, not a license.
     
  28. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    Most NYS limited permit applicants, myself included, become very familiar with the actual NYS licensure process in order to determine what (if any) regional licensure exams they should be taking. Several posters had questions concerning NYS licensure, which I correctly answered based on the research I had done using the NYS dental licensure website, while completing my permit application.
     
  29. smiles314

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    Does anyone know if NY GPR programs are giving preferences to NY dental graduates for their programs due to the PGY policy/ law? I am planning on applying from a California dental school and was wondering if it would be extremely difficult or more competitive for a California dental graduate to apply to GPR programs in NY. Thanks! :)
     
  30. ajmacgregor

    ajmacgregor Senior Member
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    I am really shocked at how clueless people are about this process, considering that all of these questions are addressed, quite well, on the New York State Dental Association Website. I know this may sound harsh, but this is a professional license you're applying for. One would think that you would be able to do a basic web search and find out this information.

    So, for those of you who are google-challenged, here's some information that answers a lot of the questions about this process (so that Gavin doesn't get his head chewed off by some ill-informed poster when he tries to help out):

    http://www.nysdental.org/img/pdf_files/reidencylaw04.pdf

    http://www.op.nysed.gov/dent4b.pdf

    http://nysdental.org/membership/students_3tier.cfm?ID=8
     
  31. setdoc7

    Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    But that is not what you said.
     
  32. kato999

    kato999 Senior Member
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    Just in case anyone cared, Minnesota is not going to continue the licensure with PGY1 credentials. I spoke with the MnDA the other day, and they are going with the ADLEX exam in the future. Last day the WREB is accepted there is July 31st of this year.
     
  33. oberalles

    oberalles New Member

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  34. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    Geez, my apologies for referring to the NY temporary permit as a license. It doesn't change any of the information I posted in order to help other users who had questions. Once again, this going back and forth with you is ruining a good thread.
     
  35. NileBDS

    NileBDS SDNator
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    Just take his/her word for it. It's true.


     
  36. NileBDS

    NileBDS SDNator
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    I can't agree more.
    I think that's exactly what these states are trying to accomplish with PG residency requirements. Maybe one day that will become as close to a standardized national exam (calibration) as we can get.

    FYI, add Delaware to the list;

    http://dpr.delaware.gov/boards/dental/dentist_license.shtml

    I heard (and this not based on any sound information), that Tennessee and Florida are seriously considering the same.
    If so, the list would include;

    NY
    TN
    FL
    DE
    CA
    MN
    WA
    CT

    ... and that's all just in the past couple of years ... doesn't that say something ?

     
  37. crazy_sherm

    crazy_sherm å♪▼æ╬‼▄·
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    http://www.cda.org/popup/Licensure
     
  38. luminator

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    Ok, I'm not sure how often they update this site but this is what it says on the california dental board website:

    Senate Bill 683 Residency Program Update:
    Senate Bill 683 (Aanestad) created a general residency pathway to licensure in California was passed by the Legislature and signed into law on September 30, 2006. The board, together with the Department of Consumer Affairs’ Office of Examination Resources (OER), are required to ensure the alignment of the competencies stated in the clinical residency completion certification with the board’s current occupational analysis.

    The work with OER may be completed in time to allow the board to consider and approve the certification and the core competencies at its April 2007 meeting. If not, the approval would most likely be accomplished at the June 2007 meeting. Once approved by the board, the certification and competencies will be put in regulatory language and proposed for adoption. The regulatory process takes approximately one year to complete from the time the regulation is noticed to the public.

    http://www.dbc.ca.gov/index.html
     
  39. rarm1

    rarm1 Senior Member
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    Hi,
    Delaware requires a GPR - they want emergency experience in dentistry and medical/airway management (the anes. rotation)...

    But this is in ADDITION to a clinical exam,
     

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