Derm research

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by nick_carraway, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. nick_carraway

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    I've seen it said in this forum that the field of dermatology requires a lot of researchers.

    I want to find out why that's the case since I'm trying to get a spot at Stanford derm during my gap year. Do derms churn out more papers relative to other specialties? Is the large amount of research due to the number of diseases that they encounter, a low number of existing therapies, or because the field is relatively new?

    Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
     
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  3. Oddsnends

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    Ecking, I am currently conducting derm research during my glide year. As in any academic field, advancing research is a sure fire way of getting noticed and into competitive programs. Since derm residency is competitive, a history of published work has extra value. There are a surprising number of MD/PhDs completing residencies where I work. Dermatology has abundant opportunities for research. If you have bench research experience you could look into cancer pathways, etc. If you would prefer clinical work there are endless drug/treatment trials.

    Since you are limited to a year, I would recommend getting a running start. Collect and review the current body of research in the area you are interested in prior to arriving. Try and have 3+ project ideas ready to present as well. Keep the designs simple and easy to run. The PI will have certain projects he/she wants run, but you can and should try and run your own high yield projects on the side. This strategy requires a lot of work up front...but once everything is past IRB and up and running you will have more free time. The first three months on the job will determine your chances of walking away with at least one published paper.
     
  4. Jccripe

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    :laugh: :laugh: More papers to fill the free time of the lazy derm specialty. HAHAHA
     
  5. postbacker

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    Are you in the current app cycle? If so, did you have any "research" on your app, or have you found that you can talk about it in interviews?
     
  6. Oddsnends

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    Yep.

    Yep. I'm a nontraditional applicant. I did 2 years of research during undergraduate in psych. I then worked 2 years in cancer research (1yr path, 1 yr clinical derm).

    I found interviewers where generally interested in the "why" of my research. ex: "Why did you pursue work in cancer research?" and "Why did you abandon the psychology PhD track?"
     
  7. nick_carraway

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    Thanks for your advice. The PI I hope to work for primarily does research on dermatologic surgery, specifically on improvements in procedures and technique. He seems to focus on novel applications for Mohs micrographic surgery and teledermatology.

    Would it seem out of place for me to introduce project ideas for as advanced a field as dermatologic surgery? I've had two years of benchwork experience but only a quarter worth of clinical experience.
     
  8. Oddsnends

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    First, if it is a Mohs practice you will gain access to a patient population of cancer sufferers. You will probably have a number of repeat offenders: transplant patients, XP sufferers, and patients with a number of AKs/SKs. These populations are commonly used in derm cancer research.

    Second, Mohs grants you access to both the surgical and path aspects of derm. You could consider things such as surgical write-ups, retrospective studies on previous cases, etc.

    Talk to your PI. In surgical practices the docs spend most of their time completing procedures and doing follow-ups. He/she probably has a number of follow-up studies they want to conduct but do not have the time to do so. Thats where you can make an impact. Just begin this conversation early.
     

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