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Did you take Inorganic Chemistry in addition to General Chemistry and Organic Chemist

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Dr. Starostik

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Did you take Inorganic Chemistry in addition to General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry?? Did taking it help at all on the MCAT?
 

Uegis

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General Chem and OChem is all you need. It might help, but the chemistry problems were not that difficult. Acid/Base stuff, some thermo, etc. All stuff you learn in general chem.

On the other hand, taking Physical Chemistry helped me with the WHOLE physical science section. Haha, go figure, its physics and chemistry combined.

I always thought that General Chemistry is same as inorganic until I was told otherwise a few years back.
 

sistahnik

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I have looked in OCC and U of M catalog for descriptions of classes and I have never seen any other chemistry courses other than Gen chem and Organic chem. I was told that gen chem and inorganic were the same thing. if they aren't then I have never even seen a class in the books with the title of inorganic chemistry. :confused:
 

2badr

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Uegis said:
General Chem and OChem is all you need. It might help, but the chemistry problems were not that difficult. Acid/Base stuff, some thermo, etc. All stuff you learn in general chem.

On the other hand, taking Physical Chemistry helped me with the WHOLE physical science section. Haha, go figure, its physics and chemistry combined.

I always thought that General Chemistry is same as inorganic until I was told otherwise a few years back.

Hmmm, I wonder. I have to take General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, but then the school I'm transferring to states that I also have to take Inorganic Chemistry as well as the other 2 listed.

I've been meaning to ask my counselor about this..... :oops: :oops:
 

IndyZX

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i thought gen chem and inorganic chem were the same thing.
 

Medikit

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IndyZX said:
i thought gen chem and inorganic chem were the same thing.

No they are different. Inorganic chemistry has the type of analysis you associate with organic chemistry. However, less is known about inorganic chemistry than is known for organic chemistry. Inorganic definitely isn't needed for the MCAT, however a few of the things you cover will be found on the mcat so it might nail something into your head that will make studying easier. Honestly the bulk of the physical science portion is physics. The small amount of chemistry that is there is totally covered in genchem.
 

Wiggy73

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sistahnik said:
I have looked in OCC and U of M catalog for descriptions of classes and I have never seen any other chemistry courses other than Gen chem and Organic chem.
Why couldn't I have majored in chemistry at your school?

My inorganic chemistry class was a graduate level course. I only wish it was the same as gen chem, because that was the hardest chemistry class I've had. We did a ton of group theory and molecular orbitals - definitely not gen chem subjects! Other than keeping some concepts fresh (I took the chem AP exam in 11th grade and skipped college gen chem), I didn't feel it was a special help on the MCAT.
 

sistahnik

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well wiggy, I have to say that all these schools offering all these different classes make me wonder whether they are just creating new ways of getting our finances!! I swear everytime I come on these boards I find out about a new class or new level of another. I will not worry because most of the schools that I have researched don't even talk about any other chemistry other than the gen and organic. if there are schools that want the inorganic along with the other 2, please tell me now. :scared: :scared: :D

P.S. now I have seen PS, and I'm not sure if ppl are thinking about that class when they say inorganic chem. :idea:
 

2badr

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IndyZX said:
i thought gen chem and inorganic chem were the same thing.
I'm going to ask my counselor about this first thing Monday morning.

I always thought for a Chem minor requirement at my school you could do either organic or inorganic. Now after re-reading the revised catalog, it seems that for Biology Majors/Premed route, you have to take 24 hours of chemistry. (Gen Chem I & II, Organic Chem I & II, and Inorganic Chem I & II). After all of that Chemistry, it seems silly not to have Chemistry as a minor. :rolleyes: ;)
 

Joplin3141

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Anyone who says inorganic chemistry = general chemistry is just flat wrong and has never looked at the advanced course listings in the chemistry department.

As a chemistry major, this became a pet peeve of mine during the MCAT process when people kept referring to gen. chem as inorganic. AHHH!

Maybe I will start using microbiology, genetics, and biochemistry interchangably. :)

Thanks for letting me vent.
 

dmoney41

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Calling genchem "inorganic chem" is extremely misleading. It's only "inorganic chem" in the sense that physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, etc are all also "inorganic chem".

Real inorganic is usually a dedicated class that focuses on things like group theory, transition metals, and stuff like that. It's pretty advanced - at my school it was an undergraduate class but required pchem as a prereq (!).
 

Medikit

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2badr said:
I'm going to ask my counselor about this first thing Monday morning.

I always thought for a Chem minor requirement at my school you could do either organic or inorganic. Now after re-reading the revised catalog, it seems that for Biology Majors/Premed route, you have to take 24 hours of chemistry. (Gen Chem I & II, Organic Chem I & II, and Inorganic Chem I & II). After all of that Chemistry, it seems silly not to have Chemistry as a minor. :rolleyes: ;)

Don't worry about it, minors don't mean anything. If you were already signed up as a chem minor you probably aren't under the revised catalogue. Is there a biochem minor route? A chem minor at my school is somewhat more flexible (anal chem is required, however).
 
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2badr

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Medikit said:
Don't worry about it, minors don't mean anything. If you were already signed up as a chem minor you probably aren't under the revised catalogue. Is there a biochem minor route? A chem minor at my school is somewhat more flexible (anal chem is required, however).

No biochem route at the school where I'll be finishing my degree. I would really like the biochem route at a "sister" school but the tuition is :eek:.
And please don't say analytical chemistry in my presence. :scared: :scared:



:D ;)
 

Dr. Starostik

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sistahnik said:
well wiggy, I have to say that all these schools offering all these different classes make me wonder whether they are just creating new ways of getting our finances!! I swear everytime I come on these boards I find out about a new class or new level of another. I will not worry because most of the schools that I have researched don't even talk about any other chemistry other than the gen and organic. if there are schools that want the inorganic along with the other 2, please tell me now. :scared: :scared: :D

P.S. now I have seen PS, and I'm not sure if ppl are thinking about that class when they say inorganic chem. :idea:

Yes, actuallly, there are medical schools that require inorganic chemistry. For example, Duke requires a year of inorganic chemistry, but they don't say anything about general chemistry. Kind of confusing if you ask me!!
 

Garuda

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Inorganic chemistry is a senior level course for Chemistry majors, which focuses on things like advanced molecular orbitals, lattice structures, transitional metal chemistry, electrical properties of elements and compounds, ceramics, etc. You do not need to take it to go to medical school.
 

Garuda

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Dr. Starostik said:
Yes, actuallly, there are medical schools that require inorganic chemistry. For example, Duke requires a year of inorganic chemistry, but they don't say anything about general chemistry. Kind of confusing if you ask me!!

Some people call General (Freshmen) Chemistry "Inorganic Chemistry" which is stupid, because Freshmen Chemistry is mainly basic Physical Chemistry.
 

group_theory

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Garuda said:
Some people call General (Freshmen) Chemistry "Inorganic Chemistry" which is stupid, because Freshmen Chemistry is mainly basic Physical Chemistry.

I wouldn't go so far as to say General Chemistry is basic Physical Chemistry (but I sorta understand what you're trying to say/do)

General Chemistry is an introduction to the numerous fields of chemistry (hence why it is also called intro chem by many schools). Calling General chemistry inorganic is a misnomer since inorganic is a branch of chemistry like organic or physical chemistry. A more approprate term would be non-organic chemistry, but that is also not accurate since some general chem course do cover a little organic at the very end (mostly just nomenclature and simple reactions). If you decide to major in chemistry, you'll basically spend the next 4 years going over the painful details of topics that you learned in general chem


Inorganic Chemistry have further subdivisions and many intro inorganic chem classes will briefly touch on some of these subdivisions (which is painful enough for most people already). The subdivisions are: organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, solid state inorganic chemistry, coordination chemistry, and nanoscience.

To answer the original question - taking inorganic chemistry won't really help you on the mcat. It might take away time from reviewing materials relevant to the MCAT (if you are planning on taking this course and MCAT concurrently). So unless you have a burning desire to study molecular orbital theory in all its glory, learn group theory and point groups and irreducible representations, learn the chemical properties (characterization and reactivity) of all the natural elements on the periodic table, and learn some bioinorganic chemistry, it really isn't worth it for MCAT sakes
 

fielight

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Dr. Starostik said:
Did you take Inorganic Chemistry in addition to General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry?? Did taking it help at all on the MCAT?

if you could choose, i'd really suggest taking the first semester of biochemistry. it's a good course, because not only will you see all of it covered again in med school (though they'll cover the entire semester's worth in the first 1-3 weeks, and then some), but it also offers a sort of "review" that combines a lot of what you learned in general chemistry, some organic, and intro level biology courses (which is great for preparing for the MCAT). if you're one of those people that survived gen chem without really understanding it, biochem could provide a chance for you to understand the concepts in an overall "big picture" kind of way. a lot of people seem to think that biochem is hard, but it's really not; i think it's the easiest of the higher level chemistry (i thought it was certainly easier than quantitative analysis, and i'd imagine compared to p chem as well), and it really pertains to what you're interested in anyway.
 

k12123

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Some people call General (Freshmen) Chemistry "Inorganic Chemistry" which is stupid, because Freshmen Chemistry is mainly basic Physical Chemistry.

So does gen chem count for the med school requirement "inorganic chemistry?"
 

k12123

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6+ year bump FTW!

If you're talking about Mayo, yes.

Hahahaha...

What about for other med schools? Because according to the previous posts, the class "inorganic chemistry are only for chem majors"...
 

Iapyx

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There seems to be a proliferation of forum archeologists digging up ancient threads. And to answer the original question, inorganic is general chemistry for all intents and purpose. For example, my state med school requires one year of general chemistry. Students at the affiliated undergraduate institution are required to take Introduction to Chemical Principles(100 level chemistry course) and Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry(level 300). A second 100 level chemistry course will not fulfill the gen chem requirement and this is coming for the med school. However, from a technical, not med school point of view, they are indeed different.
 

Frazier

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There seems to be a proliferation of forum archeologists digging up ancient threads. And to answer the original question, inorganic is general chemistry for all intents and purpose. For example, my state med school requires one year of general chemistry. Students at the affiliated undergraduate institution are required to take Introduction to Chemical Principles(100 level chemistry course) and Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry(level 300). A second 100 level chemistry course will not fulfill the gen chem requirement and this is coming for the med school. However, from a technical, not med school point of view, they are indeed different.

I like what u did thur. :):thumbup:
 

nabeel76

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Hahahaha...

What about for other med schools? Because according to the previous posts, the class "inorganic chemistry are only for chem majors"...

Yes all you need for medical schools, every one I have ever seen, is general chemistry. Medical schools call gen chem "inorganic chem" for the mere purpose of distinguishing it from organic chemistry so that students don't confuse things and only end up with 1 year of chem instead of the full two years that gen and organic require.

The true inorganic chemistry class is usually called fundamentals of inorganic chemistry or something similiar. That class is usually a 300 or 400 level course and is only required to get a degree in chemistry - not for med school prereqs.
 

torshi

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General Chem and OChem is all you need. It might help, but the chemistry problems were not that difficult. Acid/Base stuff, some thermo, etc. All stuff you learn in general chem.

On the other hand, taking Physical Chemistry helped me with the WHOLE physical science section. Haha, go figure, its physics and chemistry combined.

I always thought that General Chemistry is same as inorganic until I was told otherwise a few years back.

same here hah
 
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