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Disappointment. Need help

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by wannamed, Jul 21, 2011.

  1. wannamed

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    Hello,

    I just finished my sophomore year at SLU as a med scholar. My GPA was a 3.7, with 3.65 in the math/sciences (comfortably above the 3.5 requirement). I had over 300 hours of shadowing experience, as well other a few hundred other hours of non-shadowing clinical experience.

    After i finished my med school interview a few months ago, i was confident that i would fall into the the 98% of scholars who make it into SLUMED. My interview was a breeze.

    However, a few days ago, i received a letter in the mail. It was a letter of decline. I was outright rejected from med school.

    As you can imagine, my family and I are extremely disappointed. I've spoken with the associate dean, Dr. Willmore, two times since then. Both were lengthy conversations about why i didn't get in. He went on to say that the committee had major concerns about my understanding of the medical field and the lifestyle of a physician. In my essays and interview, i tried to convey my belief that helping others in need, provides a sense of fulfillment and reward. Yet, he abruptly shot this down, telling me that my reasoning was entirely wrong. He stated that "doctors don't feel fulfilled or rewarded, they're tired, over-worked, and depressed."

    I was rejected because apparently i don't understand that.

    He would not specify what portions of my application caused my rejection (essay, interview, etc).

    Anyways, i would advise people to stay away from this program. 5 other students were declined like me, even though they had the gpa. The 98% stat is far from the truth. It's false advertising at it's finest. In actuality, only 18-20% of the original pool of medical scholars make it into med school.


    So, here i am, a little lost and unsure of what to do now.

    The 1st thing i want to do, is immediately transfer from SLU, as its tuition is grossly expensive and no longer worth the price, but transfer deadlines for the fall have passed. I am considering staying at home for a semester, rather than go to slu. I could prepare for the mcats, do research and anything else.

    But, how does staying home for a semester look to medical schools?

    Also, if i was to transfer, how would i explain what happened to me, to medical schools, during future interviews?

    More generally, where do i go from here? what do i need to do next to reach my goal of med school?
     
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  3. haloschief

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    You applied to med school as a freshman???
     
  4. 1TB4RKSB4CK

    1TB4RKSB4CK wussup doge
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  5. Morzh

    Morzh SDN Lifetime Donor
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    You must have said something :eek: in your essays or interview that you're not telling us... you also sound like you are foreign, which may have contributed to that impression. Foreigners who aren't familiar with American culture often say and do things, albeit unknowingly, that are culturally or socially inappropriate/weird here but may not be in their home country.

    And this is the program he's talking about.
     
    #4 Morzh, Jul 21, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2011
  6. Morzh

    Morzh SDN Lifetime Donor
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    And what you should do is just keep working hard in undergrad and enjoy the experience. Apply after your junior year like everybody else. And figure out whatever weaknesses turned the admissions committee off and make sure they're gone by the time you apply. Buck up--nothing to be too upset about here. Odds are it won't make any difference 10 years from now.
     
  7. FattySlug

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    Did you have to pay extra to be in the medical scholar program? If not then it is not false advertising since there is nothing for the school to gain and they already said admission is not guaranteed.

    Now you need to do it like everyone else. Take mcat do the usual ECs and apply. This is not the end of the world. I don't think you will have to explain this in med school apps, besides the gap semester if you do take it off, since you are not really a re-applicant. Did you have to submit amcas?
     
  8. hiyaman

    Physician 7+ Year Member

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    I smell troll?
     
  9. music2doc

    music2doc Student of Mad Doctoring
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    Possible, although I could see a dean saying this if the OP seemed very naive. Perhaps, the OP made some statements in his interview that indicated to the panel that he was in this for the posh American doctor lifestyle or something. Perhaps, his clinical experience did not appear sufficient to support the statements made in his PS as to the merits of a medical lifestyle or something. I mean, really, it could have been any number of things.
     
  10. hiyaman

    Physician 7+ Year Member

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    seems pretty extreme to make a generalized statement like that though, especially from an associate dean.
     
  11. Jarudy

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    How do you think we ended up in Iraq :cool: (PS deflection)
     
  12. Foodie

    Foodie ASA Member
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    At first, I read SLUMED as "slum-med" and thought this was a total joke of a post. While it may be, in any case if what you wrote is true, that really sucks.

    If you despise SLU so much and are able to transfer to a better school, then go. But remember that better does not necessarily mean cheaper. I mean better overall, more elite, more difficult to get into, etc. You see where I'm going with this. Most importantly, do not, I repeat, do not take any time off. So you missed the fall deadline for transfers. No big deal. Go next year. Once you transfer to a better school, you won't even need to explain why you decided to change your undergraduate school. Why? Because your grades have been fine and dandy.

    Or don't transfer. Study your ass off for the MCAT and get a solid 40 and then you can shove it in your dean's face that you got into an awesome med school afterwards. Just do not take any time off in the middle of your college years. Time off mid-college is a red flag in any med school application. You can do research after college. Hell, you can study for MCAT, apply for med schools while having a full time job after college.

    As for what you said about your essay. Everyone writes that crap and the deans and adcoms eat it up. Maybe there was something else in your essay that the adcom had caught on. I don't know.

    What should you do next? Curse the unfairness of it all, then realize that life will throw you **** sometimes. You know, this rejection would actually make a great med school essay about overcoming hardships. That way you, too, can join the ranks of the depressed. Good luck to you.
     
  13. Person0715

    Person0715 Socially awkward
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    Med school is still in the cards for you. Just continue on doing well and apply during the regular cycle.

    Good luck!
     
  14. So...you claim to be an attending but you post in pre-med forums and a quick google search for "adam bamb" comes up with nothing...

    color me suspicious
     
  15. theseeker4

    theseeker4 PGY 3
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    Check one of his other posts (in the non-trad forum). Not a doctor.
     
  16. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
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    Does SLU advertise, in writing, that 98% of its medical scholars are admitted to SLUSM before junior year? I would find this highly irregular given that interviews do make or break an application.

    While medicine can be fulfilling and rewarding, if you came off as believing that almost all patients will have good outcomes and be grateful to you for your help, perhaps the adcom felt you were inmature in your understanding of the practice of medicine.

    Medicine isn't always fulfilling. Sometimes the bastards (lawyers and insurance companies) will get you down. Sometimes "death" wins. Sometimes families are ungrateful, rude, insulting, angry at God & taking it out on you. Medicine may be rewarding but more and more the rewards seem small in comparison to the hassles. Would you be satisfied if you get your reward in heaven but not before? Focus more on using your skills to work hard and to do your best for patients who you hope to make feel better and focus less on less how rewarded and wonderful you'll feel.

    The super early decision programs that admit undergrads to medical school without the horror of the AMCAS, secondaries, multiple travel dates to schools here & there, etc. are nice but not making it in doesn't mean you won't get into med school.

    Do some volunteer work in the most downtrodden place you can find. Study for the MCAT and take it in April. Prepare your application in May, submit in June, write secondaries in July and you'll be on your way to interviews in your senior year and a good chance of matriculating right after college graduation.
     
  17. robbieflick

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    If it were me on an admissions board several years down the line, I'd be more concerned with how you handle failure than success; this is a great opportunity to demonstrate that you can take feedback that may feel devastating at first and do something enormously positive with it.
     
  18. Web MD

    Web MD Doctor of the Internets
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    Definitely not a troll post as I have a couple friends from Missouri in that program who have gone through similar experiences. When I looked into it, I talked to upper classmen who told me the interviews generally kick back 25-30% of people, not 2%. It's been a 98% matriculation rate after interviews if you average it since 2001, but I hear the dean is cracking down more now. Again, if you didn't balance your expectation of fulfillment/reward with knowledge about bs insurance runarounds, long hours and litigation then you probably came off as naiive, and for a program accepting people straight out of high school naiivete is a major concern. Your gpa is solid, get some research and rock the mcat and either reapply to show up the dean or go to mizzou or some illinois schools that are way cheaper.
     
  19. Deathstar

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    Looks like you blew the interview. Your med school chances aren't over. You know your mistake. You have a respectable GPA and just apply after you get your MCAT scores. I hear students that transfer don't receive much financial aid. It wouldn't help much to transfer because of costs unless you go to a state school.
    It sucks to go to a school for a program only to realize deep into it that it's not what you thought, but you can still salvage the situation. It's not like you're behind.
     
  20. Hotshy

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    We have a similar program at my university as well. I think it is a general trend that you are describing because my university just started making it harder for people in the combined undergrad/MD track to get into the medical school. Tougher interviews and higher expectations, ect.

    But you're a good applicant just keep it up. Transfer nail the mcat and attend med school somewhere else. But that original statement is rather extreme by the associate dean. I have a decent amount of regular contact with the current and former associate dean and they are generally optimistic and usually say "mean" things in the nicest way possible.
     
  21. wannamed

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    1st off, i'm not an international student. I was born and raised in the states.

    Secondly, its false advertising, because most, if not all, of the medical scholars would not be at SLU if not for the program. Many of them have gotten accepted into other great schools, and turned them down for the scholars program.

    Willmore told me himself over the phone, that he has no say in what is said on all the med scholar ads and brochures about the 98% statistic. He told me that actually only 18-20% get in.

    When i called to find out what i did wrong, he told me that the committee had major concerns about my reasoning for becoming a physician. I had no idea where he was coming from. My essay was almost entirely about my desire to help others. I explained that through my shadowing experiences and volunteering at clinics in impoverished areas, i've seen 1st hand how important clinicians are to a community.

    I asked him numerous times what portion of my application the committee made these conclusions from. But he said he wasn't allowed to tell me that. I just wish he was more transparent.
     
  22. wannamed

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    Only thing i can do now is move on and focus on applying the normal way.

    With my gpa (3.65 science gpa), do i have a chance to get in to other schools?

    I also just bought an mcat book (gold standard) and plan to study that religiously.

    When should the mcat be taken though?

    I'm leaning towards taking it in august, but i've heard that its best to take it in the spring, because that allows for applying early, which apparently improves your chances at getting in. Is this true??

    Another reason i don't want to take it in the spring is because i'd still be in physics II

    I want to take it in august because i'd have more time to prepare...but is this too late?

    Thanks for all the help guys
     
  23. ash914

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    A June MCAT is pretty typical, and definitely don't take it before finishing physics. As far as studying, don't just study a single Gold Standard book. Check the MCAT forum for more specific help, but it's going to be a lot of work. You definitely have a shot at other schools, just remember to keep your ECs going, and post in the "What are my chances?" forum for specifics on what you need.
     
  24. wannamed

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    i also plan on taking a prep course, maybe kaplan or princeton.

    You said taking the exam in june is typical...but what about august? i like the idea of having the summer to study

    thank you so much for the help
     
  25. ash914

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    August is getting on the late end since your app isn't complete until the scores come in. Most people taking it then are either applying in the next cycle or retaking. If you can take it earlier, do so. Spend some time researching before committing to a prep course. For a lot of people, self-studying might work well.
     
  26. TriagePreMed

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    I hope you also don't get the wrong impression about this. Just because this guy told you that, doesn't mean every school will think you're naive and expect you to write that you want to have a lifestyle of depression and what not. Hopefully in your future applications you will address why you want to go to med school but understanding that medicine isn't perfect.
     
  27. Tapepsi

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    First off, I'm sorry to hear that you were outright rejected, especially since your GPA is good and it sounds like you thought your interview went well.

    While I'm not agreeing with SLU's decision as you sound like a great candidate, I have to believe that there was something you said/wrote that maybe suggests a lack of understanding of the medical field (and I'm sure only being a sophomore didn't help with their perception of you). The problem is, there are many dissatisfied physicians who really didn't know what they were getting themselves into until it was too late. Adcoms try and prevent this by trying to see if you did your research and considered the "cons" of medicine. However, I don't think that a long list of "What I don't like about medicine" is going to impress an admissions committee either. The answer?

    Take the time to really think about your motives for entering medicine and write them down. Then write down the reasons why you don't want to enter medicine (and this may require some research such as the amount of debt, healthcare, other possible careers that are less time consuming and put you in less debt, etc...). Compare the two lists and see if the pros really outweigh the cons. If they don't, maybe medicine really isn't the right path for you.

    I know how hard it is to be pessimistic and see the evils of medicine, but it's better for your eyes to be open now rather than 10 years down the road.
     
    #26 Tapepsi, Jul 22, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2011

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