KeyDell

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I just graduated from PCOM with an MS in Organizational Development and Leadership. I am an executive in a fortune 500 company and plan to stay in my field. When I chose this degree I was looking at this as a terminal degree. But as I took it I became more interested in psychology in general.

Now I want my PhD in this or a similar field. There are plenty of PhD Clinical Psychology schools in the Philly area, but none for this type of field.

I was looking at Capella University at their PhD in Psychology Industrial/Organizational Psychology Specialization or Fielding’s PhD in Human and Organizational Systems. The APA does not approve this type of degree. My understanding is they only certify PhD’s in Clinical and School psychology.

I am not planning on hanging my shingle anywhere. This is just to give me a better understanding in business. I already have a MBA and a MS. I was looking at getting a business PhD from the University of Phoenix. However I have seen that degree look down upon in the business world and have also heard of dissatisfaction from graduates. The only other school in this area that offers a PhD in Business is Wharton which would be far too expensive and time consuming for me.

So I am not picking the degrees at Capella or Fielding as an easy way out. It’s really the only option for me at this point. I know most people in here are interested in Clinical Psychology; however has anyone had any dealings with these schools? I have read a post about Fielding but I was wondering if anyone on here has gone to them. Even if it is a different major.

And as clinical psychologists, how do you look at Industrial Psychology degrees? What are your thoughts on it?

Thanks
 

50960

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I say go for it if you can afford it. I generally look at I/O folks as people in my field who make alot more $ than I do!!!!
 

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psisci said:
I say go for it if you can afford it. I generally look at I/O folks as people in my field who make alot more $ than I do!!!!
Hey psisci, many of those I/O jobs are for PhDs in I/O or RELATED fields (i.e., clinical, counseling). Why not apply for one and make some bank! That is, until CA passes an RxP law and you can collect on your psychopharm expertise!
 
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Psyclops

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Time to cry. A friend of a friend who I work with just graduated with his MA in I/O. His first job offer (he got recruited!) paid in excess of $70K with very good benefits. I'm talking a $500 a month car allowance. Aparently his situaion was the norm not the exception.
 

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Psyclops said:
Time to cry. A friend of a friend who I work with just graduated with his MA in I/O. His first job offer (he got recruited!) paid in excess of $70K with very good benefits. I'm talking a $500 a month car allowance. Aparently his situaion was the norm not the exception.
Get some I/O experience during your clinical psych training and you'll be eligible for these jobs, too. Take some I/O psych electives and perhaps design a PhD dissertation that incorporates elements of clinical and I/O psychology. I've read about a number of clinical psych people who are now in I/O. Check out Division 14 (?) for job postings. Many are open to clinical psych PhDs, as long as you have some experience.

BTW, with a PhD in clinical psych, you could start in the $80-100K range with full benefits. More if you have a private practice on the side. Psychologists in the VA system, for example, start at the GS-13 level, which is equivalent to primary care physicians. Plus you get a nice benefits package! Specializing in forensic evaluations at $250/hour helps, too. Reimbursement for psychological and neuropsychological assessment also increased to $120/hour in the 2006 CPT codes. Plus, you can bill for technician time as well. The money in clinical psych is out there, it's just that many people don't know how to go about pulling it in (read: don't do psychotherapy for a living)!
 

Psyclops

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I'm reading you 5/5 buddy! I'm not overly concerned about not making enough, obviously eveyone has some concern though. It's just that this kid was making so much with just a MA, starting out, with nowhere to go but up. I agree with your last parenthetical statment though.
 

doctorpsych

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Get some I/O experience during your clinical psych training and you'll be eligible for these jobs, too. Take some I/O psych electives and perhaps design a PhD dissertation that incorporates elements of clinical and I/O psychology. I've read about a number of clinical psych people who are now in I/O. Check out Division 14 (?) for job postings. Many are open to clinical psych PhDs, as long as you have some experience.

BTW, with a PhD in clinical psych, you could start in the $80-100K range with full benefits. More if you have a private practice on the side. Psychologists in the VA system, for example, start at the GS-13 level, which is equivalent to primary care physicians. Plus you get a nice benefits package! Specializing in forensic evaluations at $250/hour helps, too. Reimbursement for psychological and neuropsychological assessment also increased to $120/hour in the 2006 CPT codes. Plus, you can bill for technician time as well. The money in clinical psych is out there, it's just that many people don't know how to go about pulling it in (read: don't do psychotherapy for a living)!
Starting salary at 80k? wow, what kind of clinical psych jobs are you referring to? yeah, forensic works does pay, gotta get the experience though, not likely just from grad school, they don't teach you that stuff unless you go to a very specialized program I assume.
 

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doctorpsych said:
Starting salary at 80k? wow, what kind of clinical psych jobs are you referring to? yeah, forensic works does pay, gotta get the experience though, not likely just from grad school, they don't teach you that stuff unless you go to a very specialized program I assume.
Go to http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/?WT.svl=searchbutton and enter "psychologist." Psychologists with a post-doc are hired at the GS-13 level, which ranges from $74-80K/year to $100+K/year, plus federal benefits.
 

doctorpsych

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PublicHealth said:
Go to http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/?WT.svl=searchbutton and enter "psychologist." Psychologists with a post-doc are hired at the GS-13 level, which ranges from $74-80K/year to $100+K/year, plus federal benefits.
hummm, interesting... the salary range for psychologist at VA's do not seem to be much different than psychiatrists... approx. 20K diff... that's quite different from non-VA contrast... what do you attribute that to? Are psychologist in the VA allowed to prescribe meds? I don't think that psychologist in the VA are under the military umbrella...
 

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doctorpsych said:
hummm, interesting... the salary range for psychologist at VA's do not seem to be much different than psychiatrists... approx. 20K diff... that's quite different from non-VA contrast... what do you attribute that to? Are psychologist in the VA allowed to prescribe meds? I don't think that psychologist in the VA are under the military umbrella...
I think it's due to multiple factors, including the historical role of psychology as a healthcare discipline in the VA system, psychologists' being well-equipped to conduct psychodiagnostic and neuropsychological assessment, and treat PTSD using CBT and related psychological treatments, and psychologists' training in research methods that allows them to conduct studies across VA hospitals.

The range of pay for psychiatrists is much greater, up to $175K/year at some VA hospitals. There is something called special pay in the VA. Not sure exactly what it is, though, or how much extra time it requires. May have something to do with seeing more patients for medication management and billing accordingly.

I recall reading somewhere that psychologists may push for prescriptive authority in the VA, as the VA is independently regulated and would not have to go through state legislation. Not sure what became of this effort, though.

VA psychologists are not miliary. In fact, most are civilians. I know three VA neuropsychologists who make more than $100K and generate additional money through private practices. Throw on federal benefits to boot, and it's a pretty nice gig. I also think that you can retire after 20-25 years of employment.
 

doctorpsych

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I think it's due to multiple factors, including the historical role of psychology as a healthcare discipline in the VA system, psychologists' being well-equipped to conduct psychodiagnostic and neuropsychological assessment, and treat PTSD using CBT and related psychological treatments, and psychologists' training in research methods that allows them to conduct studies across VA hospitals.

The range of pay for psychiatrists is much greater, up to $175K/year at some VA hospitals. There is something called special pay in the VA. Not sure exactly what it is, though, or how much extra time it requires. May have something to do with seeing more patients for medication management and billing accordingly.

I recall reading somewhere that psychologists may push for prescriptive authority in the VA, as the VA is independently regulated and would not have to go through state legislation. Not sure what became of this effort, though.

VA psychologists are not miliary. In fact, most are civilians. I know three VA neuropsychologists who make more than $100K and generate additional money through private practices. Throw on federal benefits to boot, and it's a pretty nice gig. I also think that you can retire after 20-25 years of employment.
I imagine that with this level of pay the positions are quite competitive... any idea? still lots of vacancies too... is there a shortage of psychiatrists in the VA as well? It's good to know that our skills are being appreciated somewhere... I've meet a number of VA staffs through conferences in the past and they really do seem quite progressive... didn't know that they were getting paid that well... that's good!
 
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