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diversity of research in academic radonc

Discussion in 'Radiation Oncology' started by dunkindona, May 2, 2007.

  1. dunkindona

    dunkindona Junior Member 7+ Year Member

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    May 13, 2003
    Would I be able to do basic neuroscience research as a radonc doc? Specifically, could I study something like visual perception or nicotine addiction?
     
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  3. radonc

    radonc Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Oct 17, 2002
    maybe, but there probably needs to be some loose tie to neuro-oncology.
     
  4. Gfunk6

    Gfunk6 And to think . . . I hesitated Physician PhD Faculty Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    Apr 15, 2004
    SF Bay Area
    Doubtful, your job is to treat cancer. If you want to do basic neuroscience research you would probably better served in Neuro or Psych. I've never seen RadOnc physicians performing research which was not directly related to oncology.
     
  5. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Jun 7, 2001
    Boston
    you can do basic sci research in neuro onc unless you were essentially leaving your field of training. the better question would be, why would you want to be a radiation oncologist if your primary interest is general neurosciences.
     
  6. dunkindona

    dunkindona Junior Member 7+ Year Member

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    May 13, 2003
    During my medicine rotation, I felt like I could make the biggest difference for cancer patients. I very much enjoyed working with them. But, I am not interested in basic science research in cancer biology or radiation oncology. My research heart is in understanding visual processing and perception.
     
  7. UrbanAmish

    UrbanAmish Connectile dysfunction 2+ Year Member

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    May 21, 2007
  8. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Jun 7, 2001
    Boston
    in this era, if you want to "make a difference" you need a focus to stick with. I would expect it would be very challenging for you to get hired by a program to see cancer patients but to, say, nicotine addiction (unless some pathway were related to the field). Perhaps someone who is actually doing said research could chime in on how that happens.
     
  9. dunkindona

    dunkindona Junior Member 7+ Year Member

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    May 13, 2003
    ... has always been a challenge for me. Fortunately, I have thus far been able to pursue thoroughly my varied interests, because of my commitment and lack of need for sleep. I know the day is coming when I will have to figure out how I want to combine my research and clinical interests in some fashion to reduce the load a bit. I have thought about neurology/epilepsy, radiology, and ophthalmology since I have been in grad school studying primate (humans and non-humans) vision...Medical or surgical oncology, not so much (only because the cancer docs I know through family and college connections have thus far been radonc docs).
     
  10. ParticlePower

    ParticlePower 2+ Year Member

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    May 16, 2007
    If I allow my brain to go far enough back in time, I can remember the youthful ambition of wanting to be a rock star, super bowl quarterback, Noble Prize winner, and a dog, cat, apple, and orange all at the same time. If you love visual tracts/neuron research – do it! But don’t forget that your current research love, might change with a better understanding of the exciting questions that exist in your chosen field of clinical work. Bottom line: if you want to be the best you can be at something (not just pretty good) it requires all of your effort (and then your family, kids, parent teacher meetings, bills, cooking, cleaning, eating, sleeping, etc requires the rest).

    Good luck and choose wisely!
     

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