do a derm rotation and lose an IM specialty rotation or play it safe?

wjs010

7+ Year Member
Apr 4, 2012
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Medical Student
I have a question about DO derm. I don't how anything will be affected by the merger. I am asking this because I have an opportunity do to a subspecialty rotation and I chose derm.(in my school, derm is lumped together with IM subspecialties) I really liked the short derm module we had in school , meaning I liked the path part of it. That is the short, naive view of derm that I have. That's reason I'm doing a rotation in derm( to find out if I actually like it). My problem is this: I don't know if I can even get into derm, so I do not want to waste a good rotation by choosing something that I have no chance in getting into. I have 240/589 scores and don't know if that's good enough even if I end up liking it. My main interest is IM, most likely subspecialty, but I don't have the opportunity to do a rotation in the IM specialty I wanted in 3rd year, which is also why I'm doing the derm rotation. Should I just pick another IM specialty rotation or follow through with the derm one? PS, I do realize I have 0% chance of matching ACGME derm, so I would only be looking at AOA programs, if that is even a thing when I start applying next year.
 

PatsyStone

5+ Year Member
Sep 30, 2014
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I'd keep the derm rotation.

First, derm clinic is different from derm learning module, and having the opportunity to find out if you like clinical derm will be invaluable in allowing you to decide if you want to pursue derm as a career.

Second, even if you go into IM, having some exposure to derm is huge. If you do IM, you will have exposure to the IM sub-specialties, and you'll be able to find out what you do and don't like. However, most IM programs offer little derm training, let alone derm rotations. Believe it or not, as an IM physician, you'll be expected to manage most derm conditions despite the fact that most internists have minimal to no formal training in the specialty. During my intern year, most of the internists called skin findings either "maculopapular" or erysipelas. Even if you only do a two week rotation, you'll be able to build a better differential, understand how to describe lesions, and understand some basic therapeutic management.
 
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wjs010

wjs010

7+ Year Member
Apr 4, 2012
2,089
510
Status
Medical Student
I'd keep the derm rotation.

First, derm clinic is different from derm learning module, and having the opportunity to find out if you like clinical derm will be invaluable in allowing you to decide if you want to pursue derm as a career.

Second, even if you go into IM, having some exposure to derm is huge. If you do IM, you will have exposure to the IM sub-specialties, and you'll be able to find out what you do and don't like. However, most IM programs offer little derm training, let alone derm rotations. Believe it or not, as an IM physician, you'll be expected to manage most derm conditions despite the fact that most internists have minimal to no formal training in the specialty. During my intern year, most of the internists called skin findings either "maculopapular" or erysipelas. Even if you only do a two week rotation, you'll be able to build a better differential, understand how to describe lesions, and understand some basic therapeutic management.
Thank you. I complete the derm rotation tomorrow and have really loved it. I was hoping I would NOT, given how hard it is to go into, but I usually do those types of things to myself :)


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