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DO and Surgery

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by spyyder31, Apr 24, 2001.

  1. spyyder31

    spyyder31 Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    May 27, 2000
    Reno, NV
    Are there any Osteopathic programs out there that give any extra emphasis on going into surgery? From what I gather, osteopathic programs seem to focus pretty extensively on primary care. This is great! Because as of right now, I would love to see myself as a family prac. But what if I change my mind sometime during my medical training? Being in a DO program that targets primary care wouldn't hurt me...would it??
    I'm going to the Osteopathic Medicine Awareness Conference at COMP this weekend, and I'm sure that I will get some invaluable info on this topic there. I was just curious to hear what you guys/gals think.
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  3. nathan

    nathan Member 10+ Year Member

    Jan 15, 2001
    Joplin, MO USA
    To answer your question in brief- yes, DOs can get all kinds of surgical residencies. No, you will not be limited by going to an osteopathic medical school. To put it simply, DOs are trained as primary care physicians first, then can specialize in surgery or internal medicine subspecialties. Being trained in primary care first gives a strong foundation to your medical repitoire.
  4. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

    Apr 9, 2000
    hSDN Member
    Consider that a bonus - as Nathan states, a strong education in primary care will be a great foundation for WHATEVER specialty you eventually pursue. One of the major problems with US medical education IMHO is that we push people to specialize too soon without benefit of a good generalist education.

    Please do not worry that an education at a school with a primary care mission will hurt your chances of becoming a surgeon or anything else you want to be. It may get irritating to hear "when you become an FP" all the time (I know I got tired of it), but your job in medical school is to get a good foundation, not prepare yourself for future specialization.

    Penn State University
    Department of Surgery

    [This message has been edited by Kimberli Cox (edited April 24, 2001).]
  5. ana


    Don't worry about getting into a surgery oriented program. You can always do an externship somewhere else. Your first priority is to get accepted somewhere. Once you get some choices (ie, more than one acceptance), then you can start comparing.

    Good luck.

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