Do DO schools try to push students into primary care?

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Jack Daniel

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Let's put it this way:
8 of the top 10 schools in the nation with the most students going into primary care are DO schools. Knowing this and the fact that many schools have a stated mission of increasing primary care docs in certain areas (with residencies in those areas), it's definitely regarded highly.

However, there are some schools, like PCOM, where lots of graduates specialize in other areas.
 

fkhan3

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they dont force but they prefer... which, I think, is a good thing... we need more primary care physicians...
 

spicedmanna

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"Force?" No. Favor the training of? Yes. As previously stated, many DO schools have as their mission to train future PCP's. The osteopathic philosophy lends itself to primary care, and many schools have their curriculum geared for primary care and usually have extra rotations in underserved areas.
 

DropkickMurphy

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The osteopathic philosophy lends itself to primary care

You forgot to put "osteopathic philosophy" in quotation marks. :laugh:
 

spicedmanna

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You forgot to put "osteopathic philosophy" in quotation marks. :laugh:

Indeed. :laugh: ;)

Probably more accurate to say, "'biopsychosocial approach' to medical education with emphasis in primary care skills." :D
 

DropkickMurphy

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Indeed. :laugh: ;)

Probably more accurate to say, "'biopsychosocial approach' to medical education with emphasis in primary care skills." :D
How about simply putting it as "the way everyone is taught to treat primary care patients today"? :laugh:
 

spicedmanna

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How about simply putting it as "the way everyone is taught to treat primary care patients today"? :laugh:

Yeah, well, that's an absolutely eloquent, and completely true, way of putting it. :p

Good lord, I think I'm becoming one of those people who have their head stuck up their ***, and then attempt to obfuscate everything. Thank the heavens you are around, DKM, to provide reality checks every now and then. :laugh:
 

DropkickMurphy

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Good lord, I think I'm becoming one of those people who have their head stuck up their ***, and then attempt to obfuscate everything. Thank the heavens you are around, DKM, to provide reality checks every now and then.

Happy to help. If I can prevent one person from becoming brainwashed into thinking that osteopathic schools have any significant and beneficial differences over allopathic programs, I've accomplished something. :D
 

Taty

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I was just wondering if they did this like many state MD schools.

I think if u dont want to go to primary care...nobody can push u.
 

Jack Daniel

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Happy to help. If I can prevent one person from becoming brainwashed into thinking that osteopathic schools have any significant and beneficial differences over allopathic programs, I've accomplished something. :D

Let me state up front that I don't think DO schools have the corner on the primary care market and they do not have a method that's exclusive to osteopaths (other than manual medicine--if you can find one that really does it regularly). I think physicians treat to a standard of care.

That said, I see nothing inaccurate with talking about an osteopathic philosophy and calling it such straight up. DO schools teach this philosophy (and the 4 principles it's derived from) in all the schools using the exact words, applications, etc. If MD schools include the same info, I bet it's not packaged the same way at all ~125 schools.

Maybe I'm just arguing semantics...
 

TexasFool

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I think if u dont want to go to primary care...nobody can push u.

true, but some schools try to admit students that they think will go into primary care, thus trying to manipulate things. When I interviewed at some MD programs they said they didn't care what field we went into, then others said they wanted primary care doctors. I got lots of love from the first type and no love from the second type.
 

NickRiviera

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Some schools get extra funding for pushing out more primary care doc, docs that will serve the under-served, etc.
 

Taty

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I was asked if I want to go to primary care , I said no. Interviewer asked so what u want to be than I told him trauma or transplant surgeon..his reply was thats great...by the was it was a DO school.
 

DropkickMurphy

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Let me state up front that I don't think DO schools have the corner on the primary care market and they do not have a method that's exclusive to osteopaths (other than manual medicine--if you can find one that really does it regularly). I think physicians treat to a standard of care.

That said, I see nothing inaccurate with talking about an osteopathic philosophy and calling it such straight up. DO schools teach this philosophy (and the 4 principles it's derived from) in all the schools using the exact words, applications, etc. If MD schools include the same info, I bet it's not packaged the same way at all ~125 schools.

Maybe I'm just arguing semantics...

Well, it is semantics because the osteopaths (the extreme minority mind you) are trying so desperately to grasp at any potential- and artificial- seperation from the allopathic side of medicine, that to allow them to continue to falsely stake a claim on something they have no exclusive right to is to continue to allow them to hold the profession back from complete and total acceptance and the schools from being more than a safety net for people who could not get into an MD program.
 

DropkickMurphy

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true, but some schools try to admit students that they think will go into primary care, thus trying to manipulate things. When I interviewed at some MD programs they said they didn't care what field we went into, then others said they wanted primary care doctors. I got lots of love from the first type and no love from the second type.
Personally I'm not above saying I would strongly consider going into primary care if it would help my case; EM is basically primary care so I'm not technically lying ;)
 

Pansit

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Well, it is semantics because the osteopaths (the extreme minority mind you) are trying so desperately to grasp at any potential- and artificial- seperation from the allopathic side of medicine, that to allow them to continue to falsely stake a claim on something they have no exclusive right to is to continue to allow them to hold the profession back from complete and total acceptance and the schools from being more than a safety net for people who could not get into an MD program.

dkm this may be true or not, but I will resolve any opinion of this nature until I am truly knee deep into medical school and actually see and experience it for myself. I know you get a lot of this information from SDN and other secondary sources, but I want to see for myself how totally different the philosophy/schools of thought are...maybe those that continually complain about how similar the two are, were the ones who didnt really buy into the philosophy in the first place while those that do actually notice and do see a difference and actually apply that with their practice (through their attitudes and hands on approach...etc maybe OMM for some)
 

sunnyjohn

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EM= Primary care for poor people and the 95% of the US population who can't afford/don't have health insurance. Underserved population? You betcha'.

Folks don't know the meaning of the word 'emergency'.

Can't wait! :thumbup:
 

DropkickMurphy

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I know you get a lot of this information from SDN and other secondary sources

I wouldn't count practicing DOs as secondary sources.

maybe those that continually complain about how similar the two are, were the ones who didnt really buy into the philosophy in the first place while those that do actually notice and do see a difference and actually apply that with their practice

I'd say that if >95% of DO's don't use the extra training they get, then maybe the "difference" is so insignificant as to be neglible enough to be totally written off.
 

spicedmanna

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dkm this may be true or not, but I will resolve any opinion of this nature until I am truly knee deep into medical school and actually see and experience it for myself. I know you get a lot of this information from SDN and other secondary sources, but I want to see for myself how totally different the philosophy/schools of thought are...maybe those that continually complain about how similar the two are, were the ones who didnt really buy into the philosophy in the first place while those that do actually notice and do see a difference and actually apply that with their practice (through their attitudes and hands on approach...etc maybe OMM for some)

Yes, definitely. I agree that you should see for yourself. However, the DO's that I talked to pretty much told me that medicine is medicine, in practice. As someone mentioned above, doctors practice to a standard of care. It's my impression that schools don't change people that much, and the degree you earn (DO/MD) is rather inconsequential. It's true, however, that schools and curricula can reinforce certain positions and skills, and they often do. A person's disposition plays a large role, though.

To use a martial arts analogy, just as there appear to be different styles of martial arts, as Bruce Lee stated (and I paraphrase here), "we as human beings only have two arms and two legs; there are only so many different ways that people can move them." So, in this sense, there are many more fundamental similarities than differences between styles, if you want to see them as separate styles to begin with. Essentially, I'm here to learn the skills and techniques for treating patients to the best standard that I can. I am also looking for the form that fits my personality the best, as to continue to accentuate what I find valuable. Then, I'm going to let go of the form and just be the best doctor I know how.

On that note, the DO's that I talked to say that they like having been better trained in diagnosing with their hands and that they think it's awesome that they have OMM as an extra modality in which to provide treatment.
 

spicedmanna

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EM= Primary care for poor people and the 95% of the US population who can't afford/don't have health insurance. Underserved population? You betcha'.

Folks don't know the meaning of the word 'emergency'.

Can't wait! :thumbup:

:thumbup: I concur.
 
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