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Do I have a chance??

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Billiken03, Sep 21, 2001.

  1. Billiken03

    Billiken03 New Member

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    Ok, my numbers aren't great...I have a 3.5 cummulative and only a 3.4 science GPA. These grades include A's in Human Physiology and both OChems and a Physics, but I slacked in the beginning. I haven't taken the MCAT yet, and I plan to take it in April. I play club soccer and am excelling at that, I do a little volunteer work, and I'm working on a undergrad thesis. My question is whether or not I really have a chance at getting into med school. The reason I ask is because everyone around me seems to have a 3.8 or 3.9 but have low expectations on where they want to go (they say things like "I'll just go where I'm accepted"). I'm a TX resident, but would like to go somewhere outta state. If I do have a chance, where would be some good schools to apply to? Please be brutally honest if needed. Thanks in advance....
     
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  3. rxfudd

    rxfudd 1K Member

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    It sounds like you're in pretty good shape. With a 3.5 GPA, I would shoot for a 29-31 MCAT. I would also apply to all of the schools in your state and lots of private schools. I would say that you have a pretty good shot of getting in somewhere if you continue to do well and remain active with volunteering. Remember, 3.5 is pretty much the average GPA for matriculants.
     
  4. TwoSteveSquared

    TwoSteveSquared Senior Member

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    Get involved w/ some research, get good grades for the rest, 30+ on your MCAT, and keep up the community service. Oh yeah, don't forget some clinical experience. The balls in your court, do everything you can, and you'll be wearing the white coat some day.
    Good luck!
     
  5. Amy B

    Amy B I miss my son so much
    Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved

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    Now is the time to add clinical volunteer experiences. Check out your area free health clinics. I have volunteered for 2 1/2 years and the patient interaction is great. You get more one-on-one patient time at a free clinic than you would at an Emergency room. If you don't have any clinics, then try the hospitals.

    Wherever you volunteer just make sure it is in a clinical setting (around sick, hurt,etc patients). Med schools want to see that you know what it is like to be around people who aren't feeling well, or who aren't from your own income bracket.

    You need to show them you are willing to treat all people equally. That is why I love my time at the free clinic. These are people I don't normally deal with on a day to day basis.
     
  6. sundevil1

    sundevil1 Senior Member

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    your numbers sound fine, I only have a slightly higher gpa but managed to do well on the mcat. I don't know if the correct approach is to just make sure you have the right numbers, focus on becoming a whole package, many schools appreciate this over people with good numbers and bad personality. I agree with Amy Beth, I have just recently started volunteering at a homeless clinic and it is very rewarding. You get much more patient interaction than at the ER and you learn how to communicate and relate to people who are unlike yourself or your friends. Also, the doctors are so selfless and humble they don't mind talking to you and getting to know you.
     
  7. Doctor Wyldstyle

    Doctor Wyldstyle Senior Member

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    I'd have to agree with all the above. I had similar numbers and didn't quite break the 30 barrier on the MCAT. Yet what helped alot was the clinical experience, extra curricular activities and leadership roles. If you don't have much, work on it now. Try to maximize these even as your interviewing. You can try to plug those things during your interview and schools that focus on producing great clinicians over research will be sure to give you a closer look/acceptance if not an alternate list position at the least.

    If it doesn't work out, take a year off! I took a couple and it was great teaching hs or working in the biotech industry in addition to traveling and actually living life. Life experiences are very essential too. Hope that helps.

    wyldstyle2000
    MS1
     

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